Hot answers tagged

16

There are multiple types of film wrap, which are different plastics. No matter what yours was made from, it almost certainly partially burned up, partially melted, and partially had other heat-based reactions leaving unknown remains on your food, possibly including dioxins, which are quite toxic. In any of these cases, I would not risk finding out. ...


16

If you don't fancy cooking in aluminium foil (kind of takes the point away), you need to make sure you have a super clean, extremely hot grill. Why? Clean (No tasty burnt fat from the burgers), flesh sticks like #### to a blanket. You can get away with it when cooking steaks because they are just so much stronger. So get a wire brush and clean an area for ...


15

Use aluminum foil or even non-stick aluminum foil directly on the grate. You can use a fork to punch holes in it so that you get optimal smoke circulation if you like. The fish won't stick and clean-up is a breeze.


13

It just has to get to 145F for safety, and in boiling water that happens really fast. 5-10 minutes is totally believable. On top of that, fish is really unpleasant when overcooked, so you really want the minimum possible cooking. (For that reason, boiling is not usually a great way to cook fish - you tend to overcook it easily, especially the outside.) Note ...


11

Salmon or Tuna will make a very strong flavoured stock and will have lots of oil that coat your tongue. Not what you're looking for if you want a light brightly flavoured fish sauce. In a traditional French kitchen you want generic stocks (fish/brown/chicken/veal) that are able to be used for a wide range of sauces/dishes so having a salmon stock around ...


10

It depends on the recipe. As Jefromi said, salmon does have a different flavor. Specifically it has flavor. Tilapia doesn't really have much flavor at all. More importantly, salmon has about three times as much fat as tilapia. Salmon holds together better than more fragile white fish. This makes grilling salmon much easier than other fish which fall apart....


9

Technically, steelhead is an ocean-going subspecies of rainbow trout (a term more commonly applied to fish who live only in fresh water). They're definitely related, though; salmon, trout, and char (you can often find Arctic char in the fish case alongside salmon) are all members of the Salmonidae family. As such they're pretty similar from a culinary ...


8

I agree that you can get some good meat from the head and could use it to flavour Bouillabaisse, i wouldn't however use it for stock as oily fish can lead to a cloudy fatty stock rather than the clearer and more flavoursome fish stock that can be derived from the off cuts and bones from white fish.


8

Your set-up is fine. You'll probably eventually want to trade in the stock-pot for something like this: But there is no reason that the set-up you have shouldn't make great salmon. I have exactly that set-up (including the stock-pot for now, but the square polypolycarbonate container is on order). 125F for one hour is pretty close to bare minimum time and ...


8

Normally salmon soup is made with salmon cut into 1cm to 2cm cubes or similar pieces. At that size immersed in simmering stock, it does indeed only take salmon about 5 minutes to cook fully (see Serious Eats recipe, which cooks it for 3 minutes). Try fishing a piece out after that time; you'll see that it's cooked through. If you're really concerned with ...


6

Yes, you can. If the frozen salmon is of high quality, there is no reason based on the food science that it should not work. Many of the recipes and articles on the web indicate that you should (or sometimes can) start with frozen salmon. Some, including Cooking for Engineers, specifically recommend using frozen salmon to reduce the risk from parasites: ...


6

Yes, if it was still OK when it went into the freezer, and has been frozen the whole time, it is still safe. That's true of all foods - if kept frozen, food will remain safe indefinitely. Quality of taste, appearance and texture are likely to have taken hits in that period of time, however.


6

So, first, I don't think that gravlax looks that bad. Gravlax is never going to be the uniform peach/orange color that cold smoked salmon is (lox). It just looks a little bit under-cured. There are two things I do that are different from you, when I make Gravlax: I cure it for a minimum of 72 hours, turning every 12 hours or so (and pressing the whole ...


5

When making gravlax, both the ratio between salt and sugar and the amount of dill or other herbs is more or less a matter of taste. Personally, I am not a big fan of dill and find that its strong, distinct flavour does not necessarily match gravlax very well. I use the same amount of salt and sugar (which is common in Norway), and enough to cover the fish ...


5

Salmon has a bit of a distinctive flavor; recipes meant for it probably won't match a mild white fish like tilapia quite as well. You probably want to look for recipes for more similar fish, like catfish, red snapper, bass, or sole.


5

I believe the image you are showing is of fresh-caught salmon which is on racks being air dryed or smoked. The pattern you see are cuts made in the flesh to aid in the process. The Alaska Department of Fish and Game has an information sheet on smoking and drying fish. Cutting is done so that the fish will dry quickly by exposing as much surface area as ...


5

Sushi fishes are usually flash frozen for a few days before being used for safety (to kill off bugs) It might change the texture of the fish as it is unfrozen; the better the restaurant the better the fish will be unfrozen. http://www.pbs.org/food/fresh-tastes/myth-sushi-grade/ For fish that contain parasites, the FDA provides guidance under their ...


5

A fair amount of cooks and recipes disagree with the official guidelines when it comes to salmon's desired cooking temperature. The 145F guideline applies to all fish and shellfish, and is meant as a safety standard, not a culinary guideline. I've seen target temperatures for salmon ranging from 120 to 150F (most being in the 120-135F range). The main ...


4

The only thing which can hold patties together is raw protein. Other things can thicken them, but they don't glue them. Egg is the easiest source of raw protein. In theory, you can also use the gluten in flour, but in practice, you will have to make a dough with just a little salmon mixed in it, not lots of salmon with a little flour sprinkled, and this ...


4

1 I would say with almost 100% certainty he's referring to Millilitres by volume. 300ml is just over 10 fluid ounces and 150ml just over 5, which sounds about right for the quantity you're marinating. 2 By 2 or 3 Salmon fillets, I would think he's referring to 2 or 3 portions of Salmon fillet. 2 or 3 sides would be far too much for the marination quantities ...


4

Lots of good meat on the head (e.g. right on the cheeks), don't throw it away!


4

There are five significant species of Pacific salmon, and only one species of Atlantic salmon, which actually runs into the east coast of North America as well as in Europe. In terms of cooking, the same processes apply to all - you don't have to adjust for the species, the process works similarly. For taste, wild salmon definitely tastes better, and the ...


4

I think it depends on two things: what temperature you want to cook at and what flavors you want with it. Marge gives some ideas on some of the flavor some oils give. Peanut and grapeseed oil have relatively high smoke points, where butter has a lower smoke point which impact how you should cook the salmon - you can check this out to see what the smoke ...


4

Answer: No oil. I don't use oil. I use a non-stick pan or I grill it in oven. I don't understand why people are using oil to do injustice to salmon. I want the salmon to be firm and not mushy. I already face the problem of having to take care of the juice/oil flowing out of the salmon. I don't want more fluid added which would further mushify the fish. ...


4

This is a matter of personal preference. Assuming you are sauteeing or pan frying (as it would make no difference for poaching, for example): There is no reason that you cannot put butter and olive oil in a non-stick pan. Use a traditional pan if you want fond (the brown flavorful bits) to form at the bottom of the pan, to use as a the basis of a pan ...


4

To stop salmon skin from sticking: Use a sharp knife, and with a motion against the scales' direction, remove any leftover scales and tear the outer skin so that you get a nice diamond pattern. Pat the skin dry with enough paper towels so that there is absolutely no moisture left to be removed. This step is crucial - don't skimp on the paper towels! Oil ...


4

Steelhead is not salmon. Salmon Trout and Steelhead are types of trout, an entirely different fish from the same family of fish as salmon. A salmon is always a salmon, but a Steelhead starts its life out as a Rainbow Trout. If the Rainbow Trout migrates to the ocean, it becomes a Steelhead. If it never goes to the ocean, it stays a rainbow trout for its ...


4

I find the two very close in flavor and would say it is probably a matter of taste. If offered one and told it was the other I would probably believe it. That is not the case with most wild caught salmon. The Steelhead (scientific name Oncorhynchus mykiss) is a rainbow trout (a type of salmon) that has gone to live in the ocean. They are from the same ...


4

Maybe you have a bad fishmonger ? they do a bad job by not removing the scales? Maybe the expect the regular clients not eating the skin? Can't talk about California, but here in Montréal, fish sold in supermarkets are scaled, especially if the fish is sold in portions. It is harder to remove scales in filleted portions.


4

The smoked salmon is stored frozen and released periodically for retail sale or The fish is stored frozen and then thawed before smoking. I frequently buy thinly sliced smoked salmon frozen in vacuum packaging.


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