New answers tagged

1

"Anyone has any idea what I did wrong? Actually, in one way you were highly successful. This is exactly what you want when cooking with cast iron. Ever have seared tuna at a nice restaurant? It's cooked on the outside and raw in the middle. If you attempt to cook the food through at searing temperature you will get something with the consistency of ...


2

Searing is not cooking. You will need to finish the meat in a pre-heated oven. This is how it's done at restaurants, and seems to be what you are trying to replicate. Searing will develop a delicious "crust" on the exterior of the meat as part of the maillard reaction, without the heat penetrating deep into the meat (which is what "cooking&...


4

Heat moves slowly, and takes a while to travel into the middle your food. If your pan is very hot, the surface of your food gets heated so quickly that it burns before enough heat has got into the middle of your food. The skill in cooking on a pan is finding the right combination of temperature and time, where the middle has time to heat up to a desired ...


4

There is an extremely easy solution to this problem if you want to invest a little bit of money: sous vide. Cook to just under the desired temp (or just follow the guide for the cut on serious eats or other good cooking site) and sear the heck out of it on the cast iron like you did using a high smoke point oil (peanut or similar). It's cooking for dummies,...


38

Your pan was too hot. Cast iron pans can get ripping hot (which is good) and retain heat very well (which is also good). But, on the other hand, if you have a thicker piece of meat and want medium doneness, you should not start with maximum heat, depending on your stove. If your pan is really that hot that the outside looks burned while the inside is still ...


15

The very short answer: You had bad temperature control. You have to leave meat on the skillet until the proper internal temperature is reached. If the outside burns before that, then you used too high heat. Also, if you have a very thick steak, you may need to use more involved methods. A longer answer: It is absolutely normal that cast iron behaves very ...


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