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20

The guideline for the safe canning of tomatoes is for 2 tbsp of 5% vinegar per pint of tomatoes. If you made 16 pints then you'd need 32 tbsp of vinegar, and that is almost 2.5 cups. This isn't to prevent spoiling, the processing will do that, it's to prevent the growth of botulism, which boiling does not do. However, the recipe above calls for 16 cups of ...


12

Part of the problem is that "salsa" doesn't mean just one thing to everyone. If you do a web search for "avocado salsa" you get images ranging from liquid to chunky: Similarly, there's no one "correct" way to make guacamole. Some people like it smooth and thick - hummus-like, if you will, other people like it partially mashed and partially chunky... almost ...


8

My partner has a very sensitive "dirt-flavor" sense... One of the ingredients that may be found in salsa that often triggers it for her is cumin.


8

Yes, you should fully process your salsa, even if you got the "hot jelly" seal just from hot packing. The reason for this is that part of the processing is to ensure that the entire contents of the jar, all the way through, is at a high enough temperature for a long enough time to be safe as a shelf-stable product. This may or may not already be true from ...


7

I wouldn't trust any store brand to omit seeds entirely; it's just not going to be a priority for them. I'd suggest making your own instead. It's fairly easy and fast to seed tomatoes using a chinois, and to seed peppers using a knife. And it'll taste better, too! BTW, many online medical authorities seem to think that seeds are not actually an issue ...


7

The Pico de Gallo I make (plum tomatoes, white onion, fresh jalapeno peppers, lime juice, a tiny bit of olive oil and chopped fresh cilantro, salt and pepper) will last approximately 1 week if kept in a sealed container in the refrigerator. Over that time the tomatoes will get a little mushy and the cilantro will wilt. Perhaps you can have everything else ...


7

There's not really a definition as precise as you're looking for. Picante sauce refers to either Pace or something similar, depending on the person. So yes, picante sauce is a somewhat ill-defined type of salsa - nothing that people call picante is not a salsa. As you point out, it does not actually mean intense heat; the regular/medium is not particularly ...


7

I think what you are seeing is marketing speak. Many different manufacturers put out similar products but may call them by different names. From what I've seen, guacamole, guacamole dip, and avocado dip are pretty much synonymous. They can all be used as a dip or condiment. There will be differences, e.g. one may taste slightly different than another or ...


6

In their various parts of the world, all of these words mean sauce, at least some of the time. They come from different cultures, though, and carry different connotations at least in US usage. Short answer, though: there are no absolute differences that you can count on. Salsa This is a generic term in Spanish, and in South American cuisines. It can ...


6

In general, if jars are improperly processed or don't seal, you reprocess them exactly the same way you did the first time. This doesn't depend on the original recipe; you just have to do the exact same thing over again. In your case, since it sounds like your original process was hot pack, you would have to open the jars, dump out the salsa and reheat it, ...


6

I've lived in Austin for 15+ years, I lived a couple miles from the TX-Mexico border until I was nine years old. I have prepared many salsas at home and tasted many at restaurants and homes. My general advice on salsa is: Pick a base (Tomato or Tomatillo (or both!)) Add onion and/or garlic. Add dried or fresh chiles (e.g., guajillo, ancho, chipotle or ...


6

There are a couple of things you could try to partially recover the sauce, but my feeling is that none will have very satisfactory results. The reason is that starch gelatinization is an irreversible process. The problem is even worst for tapioca, which is rich in amylopectin in comparison with other starches like potato and corn, richer in amylose. ...


6

Kiwi. Don't knock it until you try it. It will have a similar acidity and texture to pineapple. Use ripe kiwi and maybe a touch extra lime juice!


5

Salsa in Mexico is normally what you would call a spicy hot dressing that you put on the table so people can serve themselves and spread it over their dishes or inside their tacos. As we do it in the center of Mexico it must be very (spicy) hot. There are different kinds: fresh, cooked: boiled, grilled. The most commonly used fresh salsa is the pico de ...


5

Acid is your friend here. You have some lemon, and tomatoes are acidic, but apparently that isn't enough. You should get at least a good week out of fresh salsa (mine lasts longer than that). Try adding a good shot of plain, distilled vinegar. Many recipes for salsa (including my own) include vinegar; add as much as you can without negatively affecting the ...


4

All the books I have read on canning and preserving say that in order to safely process a non,or low acid fruit or veg ,you must pressure can it. They even go so far as to say that Tomatoes ,which have usually been the one "veg" you can hot -water bath, should be pressure canned ,because todays' market tomatoes are low acid. The best book I have found on ...


4

Does your oven have a fan-grill? 30-ish tomatoes on a tray, 3 trays, set to fan grill & rotate the trays every few mins. Alternatively, use the regular oven & when the tomatoes are nearly done, switch to the grill. Rotate as above.


3

When I have mixed thoroughly I then put it in mason jars with lids and keep it in fridge for about 1 and 1/2 weeks. I have not found the tomatoes to get mushy at all. When I take a jar from fridge, I have to break seal as it does tend to seal when we put cap and seal back on. I hope this helps! (In case it's relevant, mine contains tomatoes, red onion, lime ...


3

Just chop tomatoes roughly and leave them in a strainer overnight in the fridge. It helps your salsa to have a better consistency.


3

The traditional guacamole is a salsa made specifically from avocado (the word comes from Nahuatl "ahuacatl" - avocado + "mole" - sauce). So your Venn diagram would have guacamole inside salsa. Once you start omitting the avocado in your salsa, you've left guacamole-land.


3

Cumin always has a earthy flavour, tending towards smoky especially if fried or toasted. So if you currently fry the cumin at the beginning you may get some benefit from not doing so and adding it to the salsa when you add the water-based liquids, but the chances are the best thing to do is omit it, or reduce it significantly. You may then get into ...


3

It depends on what effect you're going for. If all you want is some burnt bits? Sure, go for it. Heck, you don't even have to use the tomatoes for that; you can just burn some paper, or grind up some lump charcoal. (I wouldn't suggest using briquettes or self-lighting charcoal for that.) If you're going for the taste of roasted tomatoes, that won't be ...


2

I now use arrowroot to thicken my salsa. It has given me the best results yet, after having tried cornstarch, flour, and guar gum in the past.


2

The tomato variety used (for centuries) in most parts of Mexico for making salsa is the one called "Jitomate" the Jitomate is a (red) tomato that has an oval form and a belly button, normally smaller than round tomato. Its flavor is more intense than the round tomato, it is ideal for pico de gallo, boiled and grilled sauces. In the us you can find it in most ...


2

TFD, You can use a food processor for this, the trick is not to overprocess. I have some "mini-choppers" I used to keep around for exactly this kind of task. Here's the steps: Roughly chop the herbs, into about equal-sized pieces. Pulse them in the mini-chopper for 5s to 10s at a time. This may require mixing them around with a small spatula between ...


2

Even for 12 servings, the total quantity of herbs is small; so, in my opinion, the best way to chop it is with knife. Maybe you need to improve your technique. Use a big sharp knife, on a big cutting surface. Get all the herbs aligned and press them together with your left hand (or your right hand if you are lefty like me) in a tight pile over the ...


2

Salsa means sauce, but there are a great variety of salas to be had. It sounds like you would like a fairly chunky tomato salsa. There are many approaches to this, and an infinite variety of recipes. There is no single answer to how you would prepare your tomatoes. Choose your preparation method based on the the outcome you like. Many tomato salsas are ...


2

What about pureeing it and using it as a base for BBQ sauce or a basting sauce for roasts.


2

Salsa is the broader more generic term. Pace named their first salsa "Picante Sauce". Eventually it became popular enough for others to mimic. Hence it just means a salsa that is similar in texture and taste to the original Pace sauce.


2

dextrose and ascorbic acid, a.k.a. vitamin c, are both anti-microbials. they can be found in commercial products like fruit fresh. it's worked for me very well.


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