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30

I'd argue that 'massage' is the right word in this case. I've this technique a lot in japanese cooking -- you cut up the vegetables, sprinkling with salt as you go (so there's layers of salt in between layers of vegetables), then you really get in there and basically massage (knead?) the pile of vegetables with the salt, so that the salt not only is spread ...


15

Frozen peas don't really need 'cooking' at all. The smaller they are the less they need, too; so anything labelled 'garden peas' or 'petit pois' really all you should do is drop them into boiling water, stir & give them maybe 1 minute maximum to heat. Drain & serve immediately. Don't wait for the water to return to the boil, assuming you have maybe ...


9

For tender meat like steak, brining is generally not needed (nor recommended). However I can see some applications where you'd want to delicately brine a thick cut of a steak by submerging the meat for a long-time in a low-concentration salt-water solution i.e. equilibrium brining Quoting directly from the Chefsteps Equilibrium Brining page: The goal ...


9

There certainly are proponents of brining beef to impact texture and flavor. In my looking across the internets, it appears that dry "brining" is more common than wet, but both are used for steaks. Whether or not the results are "spectacular" is up to you. So, I would give it a try to see if you like it. For me, I generally don't prefer the texture of ...


8

For the reason salt is most commonly used: it's a flavor enhancer. We're not used to thinking of dumpling dough as possessing a lot of flavor--especially when it's there to provide a bland contrast to the savory filling of the dumpling. But salt in the dough will "make it taste more," as my mother used to say. Specifically, you'll taste the subtle ...


7

Yes, you need salt. Salt selectively inhibits mold and bacteria which would otherwise out-compete the lactic acid bacteria. I'm sure you've seen vegetables rot; that's fermented cucumbers without salt. There's no absolute minimum salt concentration. The less salt you add, the funkier and slimier the final product will be, and the more likely you'll be to ...


6

Yes, this is mostly same as rub in with salt, but with a bit more intensity and physical contact with the food. While rubbing can be taken as applying one coating, massage warrants ensuring that the salt is mixed well with the food. It's done so that the sprinkled salt is spread uniformly.


6

The water....but no need to be super precise. You should be able to taste the salt. Under or unsalted pasta water results in a flat tasting pasta. However, it is possible to over salt the water, resulting in over-salted pasta.


5

As a chemist, I'd say that you have it all wrong. You add salt to pasta water to have the salt infuse into the pasta. So as the dry pasta absorbs water, salt comes into the pasta too. Salted pasta tastes better than unsalted pasta. Salted soup tastes better than unsalted soup. Salt enhances our perception of the flavors in the soup, but it does not ...


4

Any salt added during the soaking step won’t make your fries significantly salty, during blancing the potatoes will precook and absorb some water and if salted, some salt (a 3% brine is suggested here). But the average French fry recipes I am familiar with typically don’t salt the water and many don’t parboil. - I never salted any soaking water and still got ...


4

I can only partially answer your question but still: Cold : yes, absolutely Salt : yes, that would help. Water ??? No. Bacterias love water. When trying to preserve meat you actually want to do the opposite, you want to keep it dry. That's how curing works actually. Absorbant paper is often used to prevent the meat from deteriorating by swimming in its ...


4

From the linked question on pasta absorption, When cooking pasta in salted water how much of the salt is absorbed?, which basically says "the more salt you put in, the more will be absorbed". However, one thing I've always thought to be true is that if you don't put enough in when cooking, you seem to have to add a whole lot more afterwards to lift the ...


3

Yes it does - here's the reason why: Yeast need some salt to grow properly, but they only need a very small amount (see 3rd para of intro). When you added the salt to the wet mix (sponge), you made it into a high enough concentration to inhibit the growth of the yeast, so it didn't reach the log-phase growth that you would expect when generating a sponge ...


3

Salt is necessary for lactic fermentation of vegetables. It is one of several components to creating a successful lactic acid ferment. Lactic acid lowers the pH of its environment rapidly, and to the point where competing, problematic organisms can't grow. You will probably need 2% salt at a minimum, but slightly higher amounts of salt will give you more ...


3

Seems there is no need to cook rice with salt, at least in my country or my friends who love the culinary. But if you really need some salty flavor in your rice, maybe you could: Turn your rice into fried rice, seasoning in the end. Make some yummy sauces and add onto your rice. Dissolve salt in water to become a salty solution, spray it on your rice ...


3

What you are essentially describing is a brine. That is a saline water solution that trough the process of osmosis draws in moisture trough the cell walls and releases them. This has the effect of making the cell walls more absorbent of moisture which leads to juicier meat. The problem is for brining you typically want to leave the meat in the brine at room ...


3

There is no such correct ratio. Just go with whatever feels lightly salted to your personal taste. The point is simply to differentiate from recipes in which people go for lots of salt, such as some noodle cooking techniques which require the water to be "as salty as seawater" or similar. In the end, every cook has their own subjective scale of what is ...


2

i found this other paper: https://www.cerealsgrains.org/publications/cc/backissues/1987/Documents/64_106.pdf they experimented with different types of pasta, and different type of water (salted/unsalted tap water, salted/unsalted distilled water) and the result is that approximatively for a bit more than 5 g/l of salt in water (which correspond to about ...


2

All of the suggestions that sea salt, course, fine or flaked, are the equivalent of kosher salt are misleading at best. Kosher salt in the US is a standard kitchen salt, not used solely for koshering. Its larger granules allow for more precise salting of foods during prep, cooking and serving. There are two main brands, Diamond Crystal and Morton's, ...


2

I need something to grind black salt. I've found black salt in a store but it comes in HUGE chunks, like rocks. I would imagine a salt mill would be very important to have for this purpose. Otherwise, a lot of salts you can get in specialty shops are not ground very finely. Like pink salt and some sea salts. I imagine a salt mill would be valuable if you don'...


2

There is an incorrect assumption in your question. Fleur de sel (flower of salt) is not salt collected from the top of a boiling pot of salted water. It's salt collected from evaporated ocean water. This is important and contributes to the following differences: The mineral content of the ocean is different than the contents of a pot with water and table ...


2

This theory is news to me. I would be curious of its origins. From what I know, salt is added to pasta water to make pasta taste good... works for soup too! The reason to add salt at the end when making soups and sauces, is that evaporation occurs when using longer cooking times. If you add salt at the beginning, the end product could end up being over-...


2

Depending on your climates humidity, if its too humid salt works like a big silica pack. It absorbs moisture, and you might get liquid salt runnoff. If you live in Denver Colorado, you could probably store it on your porch. General suggestions are to wrap salt blocks in plastic wrapping. Therefore if you double up that with an airtight container you can ...


2

Not at the supermarket I'd buy mine from. I've checked a couple of chocolate and a couple of vanilla ice creams (one cheap and one mid range of each). They all have about 0.1% salt, and most of this will come from the cow's milk (that contains some naturally occurring salt). Only one has salt on the ingredients list. It's a chocolate one but has no more salt ...


2

TL;DR: yes, use it. Many folks out there (my sweetie among them, so I hope she doesn't read this) claim to be able to detect an aftertaste of iodine in baked goods made with iodized salt. This is the primary reason we have non-iodized salt in the kitchen. The reason this is highly unlikely is that salt is generally only between 1-2% of the mass of baked ...


2

yes. In that case, the word massage (IMO) is used wrongly, rub would be more appropriate. It does not make sense in the case of vegetables, but it sure does with meat.


2

Short answer: Oven-dried olives are your only non-salted option. Long answer: Almost all olive cures involve some quantity of salt. Some olives are just brined; olives cured with lye are also brined; so-called "oil-cured olives" are actually heavily salted. Your only non-salted option are "oven-dried olives", a Tuscan specialty ... but they won't taste ...


2

Excellent question. The salt, through osmosis, takes humidity out of the meat. Less moisture leads to a denser product. About meat: The main structural component of the muscle fibers in meat is myofibril, which is itself composed of thick and thin filaments. Higher-than-normal levels of salt cause these filaments to swell and separate from one ...


1

How much of the salt from the cooking liquid gets into the potatoes? Not much. But more importantly, if you're worried about salt content, it's better to just cook the potatoes in unsalted water, and salt the mashed potatoes to your liking when you mash them. There's nothing magical about the salt absorbed during boiling... it'll taste as salty, and be as ...


1

The instructions mean that the quality, safety, or both, will suffer when you use cracked eggs. You are expected to throw the cracked eggs out and go on with the whole ones.


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