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37

If we're talking about the big classic pesto alla genovese, then unfortunately... There is no substitute. Basil is the majority ingredient in pesto. None of the other suggestions here will taste even remotely similar. You'll be making a completely different dish entirely. It will be some type of vegetable/oil paste, but it will not taste anything at all ...


34

There is no single, universal technique for making random food "fluffy". And you may have to live with significant changes in the recipe and in the final results if you try it. Classically, you have three types of foams. One is fat-based, the other is protein-based, the third depends on sudden gas production/dissolving. The fat-based foam is only ...


32

The good news is, you can make pesto almost out of any green using the same process and proportions as with basil -- it just changes the flavor profile. I make pesto-style sauces out of chives, cilantro, kale, arugula... I would not be surprised to find you could make a spinach pesto. Basil tastes very different from spinach, though.


15

You can explore "culinary foams" or "espumas". There are plenty of resources on this site and the internet. These can be made from many flavor bases, with the addition of ingredients that range from those found in your kitchen (egg whites) to ingredients you might have to purchase (a variety of hydrocholloids). There are many types of ...


6

Follow the recipe and increase everything by the same proportion if you want to make more instead of just adding more water. You've octupled the water but kept everything else about the same. Of course you'll have to boil off all that extra water before the consistency is correct. If you had a recipe for a gallon of lemonade but wanted two gallons, would you ...


5

If you're looking for a sugar-based dip, a way to make it fluffy is to first, boil the sugar to just under the soft ball stage. When combined with waterlogged gelatin(2-1 water,gelatin),and whipped, it make a marshmallow-y fluff, then you can fold in your flavorings. if you want say, hot colocate, i world recommend putting powder milk and cocoa in. a good ...


5

Garlic mellows pretty rapidly with heat. Dropping it 2 minutes before you've completed sautéeing your onions is enough to knock the raw edge off it - in fact that's the common deciding factor as to when to add your liquids, "Fry until the raw smell is gone". After that, the longer it simmers the more 'relaxed' it gets. If you want more punch, try ...


4

There are a lot of varieties of basil, that have some subtle differences in taste, but there's usually a mild background of licorice. (And honestly, basil was ruined for me for many years after my mom mentioned it, because I hate licorice.) Cook's Thesaurus recommends : oregano OR thyme OR tarragon OR summer savory OR equal parts parsley and celery leaves ...


4

Yep, fresh tomatoes will work fine. You'll likely need to cook them longer than you would canned tomatoes, and you may need to use more. If you like, you can skin them first: slice a wide, shallow "X" on the bottom of each one and drop them into a pot of water at a rolling boil. After a minute or two, the skins will have peeled back at the X and ...


4

Recipes that call for canned tomatoes usually do so because these are picked and preserved when at peak ripeness, as well as saving you the trouble of peeling. For whole or chopped canned tomatoes, you can substitute fresh tomatoes (get the ripest ones you can) that you'll have to peel yourself. For other canned tomato products (like passata or paste), you ...


4

What you are discovering is that you can control they way garlic impacts a dish. You do this depending on how it is cut, chopped, mashed...and cooked (from raw to lightly toasted to slowly caramelized...)... and when it is added to the dish. Raw garlic is certainly more "harsh" than cooked. You will have to decide how much is enough...or too much....


3

Good news for you: you can make pesto out of just about anything. The word "pesto" actually refers to the manner it is traditionally made (with a mortar and pestle) and shares etymology with both "pestle" and "paste". And that's basically what a pesto is: a paste. In English-speaking countries, "pesto" is typically ...


2

The problem is not that you need more water, but you need less to start. There's water in the teriyaki sauce, water in the soy, and water in the whiskey, and you're adding 8 more cups too that. When you cook the sauce down you are evaporating water out of it until you have the consistency and intensity of flavor you want, you could start with half the water ...


1

No. Anecdotal, I rarely use white sauce in lasagna and it always rocks.


1

You can add ingredients using modified soy protein and xanthum gum to whip certain liquids. A Youtube Channel named the King of Random made a video about this topic, where they used Versawhip modified soy protein and xanthum gum in order to thicken liquids to allow them foam up in a sustained fashion. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6wzX1DrhQY This worked ...


1

The flavour of water-based mustard reaches its peak about 15 minutes after you make it. After that it declines quite rapidly. If you're making fresh, then you really should make just enough for 'today'. The predominant 'hit' of mustard is very volatile & will quickly dissipate. Store-bought mustard is vinegar- & oil-based, which makes the flavour ...


1

Adding to what Moscafj said, the reason you get the harsh flavor is a chemical called allicin, which forms as soon as the cell walls of the garlic are broken. That's from this video (check around 6:42 for the discussion of garlic). Some pasta sauces have you introduce differently cut/grated garlic at different times so that you can layer different flavors.


1

I have a method, which I have used on salad dressing bottles in the past. Take a bamboo kebab skewer (needs to be wooden, not steel, for the texture). Put a funnel in the bottle's neck. Pour in the thick liquid. Put the skewer through the liquid and funnel hole to the bottom of the bottle, or as close as you can get. Move the skewer up and down. The liquid ...


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