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68

Sauteing onions: Softens them, most people prefer not to run into raw onions in their sauce. Onions will cook in a sauce, but very slowly, so frying them before makes sure they will be soft even if your sauce has a fast cooking time Releases sugars, making them taste sweeter Reduces the onion's harshness Browning the onions creates flavor Sauteing garlic: ...


61

What about a piping bag? Fill the bag with a spatula, pipe into the bottle.


56

You do not need to make a roux. While your proposed technique of adding flour directly to milk will almost certainly lead to clumps, there are other ways to incorporate flour, butter, and milk: namely, a beurre manié. First, let's explore why flour clumps in hot liquid. As explained in this Seattle Times cooking advice column, flour will immediately ...


37

You can find out. Split your sauce into 2 batches. Add onions and garlic raw to one and sautéed to another. Some people like the sharp strong taste of those things raw. In the US that is not common. Sauteeing will mellow the taste. When I make sauce I sauté it because I hope someone else will eat it besides me. If you are not sure or you are American ...


37

If we're talking about the big classic pesto alla genovese, then unfortunately... There is no substitute. Basil is the majority ingredient in pesto. None of the other suggestions here will taste even remotely similar. You'll be making a completely different dish entirely. It will be some type of vegetable/oil paste, but it will not taste anything at all ...


34

If she was doing this in a pan on the heat (melting the butter, stirring in the flour, then adding milk), this is called making a roux, then a béchamel. If, instead, she kneaded the flour and butter 'cold', then added this to a hot liquid, it is called beurre manié. Notice that in both cases, the sauce is heated. From your question I could not tell if, and ...


34

There is no single, universal technique for making random food "fluffy". And you may have to live with significant changes in the recipe and in the final results if you try it. Classically, you have three types of foams. One is fat-based, the other is protein-based, the third depends on sudden gas production/dissolving. The fat-based foam is only ...


32

The good news is, you can make pesto almost out of any green using the same process and proportions as with basil -- it just changes the flavor profile. I make pesto-style sauces out of chives, cilantro, kale, arugula... I would not be surprised to find you could make a spinach pesto. Basil tastes very different from spinach, though.


28

Strain it, or put the peppercorns in cheesecloth which you can easily remove. Obviously both ideas would work better if the sauce was thin then thickened after the peppercorns were removed.


24

As you state, you have not followed any canning procedures, so you don't get any more storage time than the standard recommendation. Glass vs plastic doesn't matter. So, I would just recommend freezing. Tomatoes, and tomato based sauces for that matter, freeze nicely. If you use freezer, zip-style bags, you can freeze them flat. They will then thaw ...


20

One way to steep peppercorns in a sauce is to put them in a tea ball or a tied up piece of cloth which is submerged into the sauce and then removed before serving. If they are just dropped into the sauce they'll have to be strained out, which only works if the sauce is smooth.


18

You can also use ‘layering’, particularly with the garlic. Garlic fried in oil at the beginning of the process contributes rich, mellow, savory flavors, but a little finely minced or shaved garlic added right near the end adds a sharper, fresher, more ‘forward’ garlic flavor. I guess you could do the same with onion, though I wouldn't add it as close to ...


15

You can explore "culinary foams" or "espumas". There are plenty of resources on this site and the internet. These can be made from many flavor bases, with the addition of ingredients that range from those found in your kitchen (egg whites) to ingredients you might have to purchase (a variety of hydrocholloids). There are many types of ...


12

Edited: Concerns were expressed about such items being suited for food use. I've added comments in the text on "Food Grade" items plus a note at the end. How can I get a very thick or viscous paste (e.g. caramel, ganache, thick mayonnaise) into small-necked squeeze bottles without heating it up? Consider using a "grease gun" as used by mechanics. These ...


11

Anyone here who gives you an estimate beyond what a typical (non-canned) refrigerated sauce would last is just going to be speculating. The thing about canning recipes from reputable sources is that they are tested scientifically. They often run hundreds of trials with testers for a particular recipe, then test each for bacterial growth, etc., before ...


10

There are thick food grade syringes being made for that kind of application.. https://www.amazon.com/Syringes/dp/B07C71C1LH/ The plunger comes out at the back easily, so you can pour your sauce into the syringe, and then inject it into your dispensing bottle.


10

When doing a stew or a Cocido (kind of soup) in Spain, it is common to use bags similar to the ones some people use to wash their clothes without mixing them. We call them cooking mesh. As you can see, it can be useful for many things, like using the ingredients separately for other food later, or easier separation. The same works for any food, but the ...


8

As already mentioned - no, don't keep dairy for extended periods. Have you considered making just the sauce base without the dairy - or even without the final elements that would differentiate it from being 'generic curry' to being a masala sauce? Sauce bases can be stored for months in the freezer. I usually have containers with just enough to make a ...


8

Garlic: Many of the flavors in garlic are oil-soluble, not water soluble. In fact, you can just crush garlic cloves, saute in oil, and then remove the garlic completely. The oil will taste strongly of garlic, as will the final dish. Sauteing your garlic will help these flavors be more apparent in the tomato sauce (the flavors will also be slightly ...


8

If you want to make bechamel, a roux is necessary because, well, that's what bechamel is. If you use your proposed method (or anything else) then the result will not be a bechamel, per definition, and it will also taste differntly. In the first place, you will be missing all the fat, and then there are subtleties like the flour not being fried. This doesn't ...


7

Honestly, you either eat it fresh, or accept it will congeal. There are 2 factors going on, the pasts will keep absorbing water until there's almost none left the cheese will set as it cools. The upside is 'yesterday's mac cheese' is great in & of itself. Your only 'fix' is make it wetter or eat it sooner.


6

No, you shouldn't can products containing dairy. Dairy products can be contaminated with botulinum bacteria and the canning process kills off any beneficial bacteria that can compete with the bad ones. See eg this link.


6

Yes and no. Stainless steel is not "reactive"; generally that term refers to cast iron, aluminium, or copper cookware. So from that perspective you can swap it. However, a recipe which expects a ceramic or enameled cast iron dutch oven probably is calibrated for cookware that has a high thermal mass and slow heating for its contents. So if your stainless-...


6

Focaccia dough stretched and rolled thin, painted with olive oil, sprinkled with fresh herbs and coarse salt then lanced about with a fork is a wonderful pizza with no need for any sauce or other toppings as a snack of side dish. From there as a starting point you can start adding toppings, cheeses, even sauces to ones hearts content. Herbs could be dried ...


6

Follow the recipe and increase everything by the same proportion if you want to make more instead of just adding more water. You've octupled the water but kept everything else about the same. Of course you'll have to boil off all that extra water before the consistency is correct. If you had a recipe for a gallon of lemonade but wanted two gallons, would you ...


5

In European and Mediterranean cooking traditions, it's unusual to find raw onions added into a sauce which is cooked or served warm. As GdD alluded to, onions (and other aliums) have harsh, not-entirely-pleasant flavors and odors which become very apparent when they're warmed, and which are removed by sauteing or other dry cooking. (Think of the odor of a ...


5

Similar to the other suggestions, you can use a large mouth water bottle, sports drink bottle, or restaurant style condiment bottle as a syringe. I've used a large mouth funnel into one of these with dry ingredients, then put the lid/cap back on to use as a squirt bottle. If the bottle doesn't already have an opening, you can make one with a drill or knife. ...


5

A wierd idea - if you squeeze the bottle, put its neck into the paste while squzeed and then let go, it will suck up the food inside? :o


5

Garlic mellows pretty rapidly with heat. Dropping it 2 minutes before you've completed sautéeing your onions is enough to knock the raw edge off it - in fact that's the common deciding factor as to when to add your liquids, "Fry until the raw smell is gone". After that, the longer it simmers the more 'relaxed' it gets. If you want more punch, try ...


5

If you're looking for a sugar-based dip, a way to make it fluffy is to first, boil the sugar to just under the soft ball stage. When combined with waterlogged gelatin(2-1 water,gelatin),and whipped, it make a marshmallow-y fluff, then you can fold in your flavorings. if you want say, hot colocate, i world recommend putting powder milk and cocoa in. a good ...


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