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2

Adding an acid is indeed the way to brighten a sauce. You could go with vinegar (red wine, sherry, champagne, rice) depending on the ingredients in the sauce. Alternately, a squeeze of lemon is often used. Start with a small amount...you can alays add more.


0

Great question! The previous answers are great but have left out an important detail for those new to the process: be careful with the pan temperature! Especially with garlic, you want only moderate heat. If you're following @nexus_2006's excellent advice of adding dry spices to the oil and garlic (if only salt and fresh ground black pepper), you still ...


2

Follow the recipe, and failing that, always sauté first. As noted by previous commenters, sautéing accomplishes a number of things. Overall, softening is not that important, they will soften while simmering in the tomatoes. But the release of sugars is. Also the browning and flavor that comes with that (though some recipes call for sautéing only until ...


1

Athanasius is correct that any comment you'll get here is anecdotal at best - so here's my anecdote. We do exactly this regularly (we make a batch of Marinara, put it in a mason/bell jar with a standard canning lid directly from the stove, let cool, then put in the refrigerator or freezer). We don't get much more than a week, maybe 2 at most, before mold ...


8

Garlic: Many of the flavors in garlic are oil-soluble, not water soluble. In fact, you can just crush garlic cloves, saute in oil, and then remove the garlic completely. The oil will taste strongly of garlic, as will the final dish. Sauteing your garlic will help these flavors be more apparent in the tomato sauce (the flavors will also be slightly ...


5

In European and Mediterranean cooking traditions, it's unusual to find raw onions added into a sauce which is cooked or served warm. As GdD alluded to, onions (and other aliums) have harsh, not-entirely-pleasant flavors and odors which become very apparent when they're warmed, and which are removed by sauteing or other dry cooking. (Think of the odor of a ...


18

You can also use ‘layering’, particularly with the garlic. Garlic fried in oil at the beginning of the process contributes rich, mellow, savory flavors, but a little finely minced or shaved garlic added right near the end adds a sharper, fresher, more ‘forward’ garlic flavor. I guess you could do the same with onion, though I wouldn't add it as close to ...


35

You can find out. Split your sauce into 2 batches. Add onions and garlic raw to one and sautéed to another. Some people like the sharp strong taste of those things raw. In the US that is not common. Sauteeing will mellow the taste. When I make sauce I sauté it because I hope someone else will eat it besides me. If you are not sure or you are American ...


64

Sauteing onions: Softens them, most people prefer not to run into raw onions in their sauce. Onions will cook in a sauce, but very slowly, so frying them before makes sure they will be soft even if your sauce has a fast cooking time Releases sugars, making them taste sweeter Reduces the onion's harshness Browning the onions creates flavor Sauteing garlic: ...


11

Anyone here who gives you an estimate beyond what a typical (non-canned) refrigerated sauce would last is just going to be speculating. The thing about canning recipes from reputable sources is that they are tested scientifically. They often run hundreds of trials with testers for a particular recipe, then test each for bacterial growth, etc., before ...


24

As you state, you have not followed any canning procedures, so you don't get any more storage time than the standard recommendation. Glass vs plastic doesn't matter. So, I would just recommend freezing. Tomatoes, and tomato based sauces for that matter, freeze nicely. If you use freezer, zip-style bags, you can freeze them flat. They will then thaw ...


-2

The sauce is Dynasty brand brown gravy sauce, a very thick, sticky substance with little flavor of its own. If added to rice when about done, just before mixing in the eggs and veggies you get the old fashioned dark brown fried rice. McQuink


1

First blanch tomatoes in boiling water and cold shock them in ice water, then peel/rub off skins. Next, squeeze skinned tomato to release excess water. That water can be saved to reduce or added later to loosen the sauce. Put solids in another pot. Process the seeds out using a tomato grinder if you have one. Heat crushed tomatoes slowly, you could even use ...


0

Found this recipe on the lingling website. I think this is the sauce. Pomegranate Korean BBQ Sauce A made-from-scratch Korean BBQ sauce is sweetened with pomegranate juice and served with Ling Ling Potstickers. Serves 4 1 1/2 cups barbecue sauce 3/4 cup pomegranate juice 1 tablespoon sesame oil 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1 tablespoon sriracha 1 tablespoon ...


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