15

Well, having grown up near "the" Sauerkraut region in Germany - I'd say don't. Honstly, I hadn't ever thought about why until today (can't have been only lazyness that my ancestors left the kraut in peace until done.), but: Why making really sure to create a water-seal when you are breaking it with stirring? The kraut is supposed to ferment under the ...


13

2% (20g per 1000g) would be my default recommendation based on sources local to me, but with care less salt may work if sanitation is extremely good (to minimize introduction of undesirable bacteria which the salt helps to supress.) On the high end, I can say that 4% seems to slow things down, but work, and 8% seems to be simply too much. The pictured jars ...


11

At every restaurant I've ever worked at we warmed the sauerkraut on the griddle while the bread and meat were grilling. This evaporated much of the moisture in addition to making sure the sauerkraut was warm enough to not make the sandwich cold. So we'd have the sandwich warming up open faced, cheese on each face. Then meat and sauerkraut would be warming ...


8

Exposing the sauerkraut to air is undesirable: we want an oxygen-free environment for the bacteria to do their work, and air exposure also brings increased (though small) likelihood of surface contamination (by mold for example). I don't have a reference but I'm pretty sure that historically opening a crock to stir was not a thing. And regarding your ...


8

Yes, saurkraut can go bad. It is a fermented product, protected from other micro-fauna growing by the acidity of the juice, a natural pickle created during the fermentation. Having the juice cover the solids is important to protect them from spoilage. If the juice gets diluted, or there simply is not enough to cover the kraut do to spillage, being eaten ...


7

It really comes down to taste. In this usage, you're treating sauerkraut like a condiment so there's not really a "correct" answer.. A lot of hot dog places have traditions - for instance, Nathan's Famous hot dogs (the original "Coney Island" hot dog) uses these combinations with kraut: -Sauerkraut, spicey brown mustard (New York style) -Thousand island ...


6

I typically use kosher salt. You could use sea salt as well. It is not necessary to use canning salt.


6

I'd actually add more cabbage rather than an entirely different vegetable. Despite what grandma believed, potatoes are not this magic salt-absorbing sponge: the advice to add potatoes to oversalted foods stems from the fact that more food with the same amount of salt equals less-salty food. In other words, potatoes don't absorb salt, they dilute it; and ...


5

Correct me if I'm wrong, but to my eye it looks like there is a tiny gap between the two containers so the surface of the fermenting liquid is slightly exposed to air. Is that correct? If so, you have an "open crock" apparatus where the surface is exposed to air. While "open crock" is a very traditional method (and Alton Brown seems unconcerned), as I ...


5

If you have one, a potato ricer is very effective at removing moisture from things that don't drain effectively with gravity alone, e.g. sauerkraut, cooked spinach, salted cabbage, salted squash/marrow, etc. In my experience, it's more effective, and easier to clean, than a salad spinner. (For best results, look for the kind that's pictured above, with ...


5

In brief, your question has no possible general answer for the kind of scenario you posit (where you add a certain amount of salt to a certain volume of food) or even a scenario where you add a brine of concentration X to a certain amount of food. Most vegetable (and animal) sources for food contain significant amounts of water, and some of that water will ...


4

If you follow proper procedures, it's safe. The correct amount of salt (initially) and the acid developed by the desirable bacteria population prevent the process being taken over by non-desirable bacteria. It works. Right around 2% by weight salt to cabbage (or cabbage and...) is a good number, with Stephie's German sources suggesting that possibly even 0....


4

I checked a few German Sources1 and found a range between 7.5g salt per kg cabbage2 and 20g salt per kg cabbage3. So anywhere between one and a generous two teaspoons per kilogram (two pounds) should be fine. But what exactly is the salt doing in your cabbage/sauerkraut? Well, in theory you could leave it out. The bacteria and yeasts necessary for the ...


4

In general, slimy brine is indicative of a fermentation problem. Your brine might be too weak (what concentration did you use?), it may be too warm, your brine might not cover the vegetables, there might be some air bubbles trapped in your ferment. This article suggests that in the early days of sauerkraut fermentation, the concentration of slime forming ...


4

When making pierogies I personally place the sauerkraut in the palm of my hand and apply pressure with the other hand. I keep turning the sauerkraut over to make sure I get it from all sides. I would imagine this method would work for making Reubens as well. This might work well for me since I am a bigger guy and don't have wrist pains so your mileage could ...


4

Apparently, it has been done. According to this website, the flavor will be strong compared to sauerkraut: The flavor is strong; hard to describe — not just simply more acidic but strong, and the texture is a little tough... I also find that kale ferments accentuate the salty flavor, no matter how carefully I salt and I have no idea why. Mirror this with ...


4

Brining vs. Dry-Salting Vegetable fermentation is normally done by one of two methods: brining (submerging whole or chopped vegetables in brine) dry salting (mixing chopped vegetables with salt and letting osmotic magic draw fluid from the vegetables to create a brine) I'm pretty sure you're describing a brining process. Kraut is normally a dry salted ...


3

In my experience a month is a bit long (although of course this depends on the size of the batch, etc) for active fermentation - however I don't think that's the problem. In fact, I don't think there is a problem. Since Sauerkraut is a 'wild' food, there are some variables that you can't (and shouldn't) control. The most likely (85% sure without knowing ...


3

I'd strongly suggest succeeding on the small scale first, but you can do what you like. Metal garbage can with plastic liner sounds like a terrible idea (plastic liners always seem to get leaks, and then you have acid in a metal garbage can...) Disclaimer - I have two quart canning jars going right now. Depending how they go, I'll consider a larger batch in ...


3

I use two square, food grade, cambro containers of slightly different sizes. The cabbage (or any other veg. to be pickled) goes in the larger one. The smaller one gets filled half to three-quarters of the way with water, and gets placed on top to serve as a weight. This works for me because I don't need any extra containers just for pickling. I have the ...


3

It will likely mold on top, where the cabbage is exposed. You can simply remove that layer, the kraut below will be fine. Alternately, you can top it off with brine...or use a container, smaller than the opening of your jar, filled with water, to weigh it down.


3

Is the crock kept in a place where the temperature is steady (such as a cellar/basement) or is it exposed to daily temperature swings? As a a rule the ferment should produce gas to some extent (which would push water out, if anything) but repeated temperature swings would tend to "pump" out when warm, in when colder. When the initial gas production slacks ...


3

To mix, use any bowl that won't be damaged by the salt. I would stay away from metal or wood, anything else would be fine. To store, just use a glass jar. I usually use a half gallon canning jar, but if you're making a lot you can use a gallon jar. Cover the cabbage with a big flat cabbage leaf. (Or a grape leaf). Press down, so the leaf is covered ...


3

Try pouring off some of the brine that the kraut is sitting in and replacing it with equal amounts of water. That's an easy way to lower the salt concentration without changing too many other variables.


2

Use a salad spinner. It is the right tool for the job. It might be a bit more work when you factor in cleaning, but it will get the sauerkraut drier than the fork-in-strainer method.


2

Well, now you've increased the odds of a variety of things you don't want, because you opened it up "to try some" and never had it all that well sealed (according to what you wrote - I don't use "professionally separating fools from money" airlocks either, but I seal my kraut jars to keep air out, and I leave them that way for a good 6 weeks, so I have no ...


2

I too made sauerkraut that was too salty, by adding more water and salt when the level of liquid dropped. Fortunately the too salty part was mostly on top, but the kraut by itself was still too salty. I drained the liquid from each jar onto a glass measuring cup (or bowl) and rinsed the kraut in a colander with cold water, squeezing the kraut throughout the ...


2

Any salt will work just fine, salt is salt. But salt that has had iodine added (table salt) can result in a brine with a cloudy texture. Some might consider this less aesthetically pleasing. Edit: Further research indicates that while iodine can cause some problems, other impurities can cause further problems: Salt for pickling: For pickling any ...


2

yes, it can go bad and did with me. I ate a serving and regretted it for a week. Take no chances, throw it out.


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