52

Cured meat should not be emitting methane- or any other flammable gas. That would be an indicator of advanced spoilage and you would notice the smell. A more likely culprit, in my opinion, would be fat. Fat burns well, of course, and sausage is full of it. Tiny splatters of fat can become aerosolized and travel a good distance where they would ignite on ...


29

This is going to sound strange, but the 'low calorie oil' that you're looking for is water. What you do is you start the sausages cooking in a little bit of water (about 1 cm; 3/8"). The water will prevent the sauages from getting too hot too quickly, and the fat in them will start to render and leak out into the water. Once the water evaporates, you're ...


14

By "Italian Sausage" I think you mean the seasoned pork sausage available in many supermarkets throughout the US. I've found that a 30-70 mix of beef and turkey/chicken works reasonably well as a substitute when pork is not available. Beef is too strong a flavor and turkey too weak in its own. Flavor-wise most italian sausage has red wine, fennel, and ...


12

It is due to a combination of several factor, depending on how the particular sausage was made: Dry cured sausages contain curing salts, a mixture of regular salt and sodium nitrate (which breaks down into sodium nitrite), which prevents the growth of botulism while the sausage cures. Meat for dry cures sausage is also often frozen to specific temperatures ...


12

It is most likely just a void. It is hard to pack a casing 100%. There will be voids. Could it be (toxic) bacterial gas? Maybe but not likely.


12

It's spitting hot fat - still a liquid rather than a gas. This then touches the element and ignites. Sometimes more ignites than other times. You get the same effect when frying, even without added fat. I've had flames up to face height from frying sausages on a rather fierce camping stove.


10

Both sweet and mild refers to the sausages without hot red pepper flakes. The fact they are called sweet Italian sausages doesn't mean they contain sugar.


10

To avoid it, you'd need to pack them in a way that makes them more like hot dogs than sausages. Hot dogs are a smooth emulsion of (usually) reclaimed meat, fat and spices. Sausages are mince that's been somewhat loosely packed and cooked (usually smoked) in a casing along with herbs, fat and spices. With synthetic casings, you can pump a bit more pressure ...


10

Milk's natural pH is about 6.5, just slightly acidic. If it approaches a pH of 5.5, the casein proteins lose their negative charge and the micelles no longer repel each other, meaning they start to gather in small clusters. At around pH 4.6, the scattered proteins bond to each other again and begin to curdle. Though this kind of curdling is not the same as ...


9

The real question should be "what makes sausages pink" - but more later. All meat turns greyish-white or brown when cooked. This is due to the myoglobin, which makes raw meat look pink or red, being not heat stable. When cooked it denaturates to metmyoglobin, which is grey-brown. For pinkish sausages, curing salts are used. They contain sodium nitrite, ...


9

This article by Bean Scene magazine describes an experiment they carried out to determine just that: When we adjust the pH in smaller steps, we start to get a picture of the conditions that cause each milk to curdle. Cold soy milk curdles at a rather mild coffee pH of 4.6. Meanwhile dairy milk is much hardier. You need a very acidic pH 4.1 to curdle it. ...


8

Chuck? As in beef chuck? Not that it won't work, but it'll be slightly different taste and texture wise than the more common pork sausage. I don't think the # of grinds is the issue. I'd be looking more at: temperature. Do you put the meat in the freezer for an hour or so before grinding, and are your bowls/grinder/etc cold? If your meat gets too warm, it'...


8

If you are looking to smoke the sausage without a casing I would suggest forming your sausage into a leaf, grape or banana or into a corn husk. The banana or corn husk are not edible but the grape leaf would be good to go. I was going to suggest eggroll wraps or spring roll wrappers but I don't think that would be smoker friendly.


8

If you're looking to parboil, likely your best bet is one that you've already dismissed -- inedible casings that you'd remove after cooking. You might even be able to get away with clingfilm, parchment paper or non-stick aluminium foil. If you really want an edible casing, they do exist, just enter 'vegetarian sausage casing' into your preferred internet ...


8

Professional charcutier here. We usually only make beef sausage from grass fed beef, which means our ground beef is very lean. Depending on the recipe, we have various tricks for improving the texture: We add beef fat if available to add richness, or even pork fat if we don't have enough beef fat. For a 5lb batch of ground beef for hamburgers, we'll add an ...


8

That foam is perfectly natural. The foam is the result of meats natural protein composition. If you've ever poached eggs, or boiled lobster, or cooked a stock, you'll know that the water can become a little scummy. If you leave the pot on, that scum makes a white-ish or grey-ish foam that forms lovely looking rafts. That foam is made of water soluble ...


8

The short answer is yes, salumi produced in the US is a fermented product. The process is different from salumi produced in Europe, but it is still a fermented product. In the US, producers rely on rapidly lowering the pH by using fast acting starter cultures and higher curing temperatures (as high as 104 F). Whereas in Europe, a lower temperature, and ...


7

Checking for redness is not a good indicator of doneness. For instance, freezer burned chicken tends to look less red or pink--taking on white spots and a grayish color. Some meats will also stay red no matter what. Think back to every time you saw real pork bacon. Were the meat strips ever any color except red, even when fried to a crisp? The most ...


7

When talking about chorizo, it's worth specifying Spanish (papery skin, fairly dense, often cured) or Mexican (often plastic skin, loose, usually uncured). Same name for two very different products. Mexican should be peeled, Spanish usually shouldn't.


7

Hot dogs are a an example indigenous to North America of a class of sausages called emulsified sausages. The meat and fat are ground so finely that they emulsify together into a smooth paste. Other sausages of this type include German Frankfurter Würstchen (of which the hot dog is a descendant) and Italian Mortadella (which is also the pre-cursor of the ...


7

You need to let the sausages sit exposed to some air -- refrigerated, of course -- for a few hours (preferably overnight) so that the twisted segments of casing dry out and become tough again. Lay them out on a baking sheet, uncovered, and flip them at some point to make sure the whole surface is drying. If you have space, you can hang them up so that all ...


7

There's no health issue here, the sausages will be cooked enough to be safe. The reason you fry off the sausages first is that you make the casings more edible, get flavor from maillard reactions and browning, and maybe get rid of some of the fat (if you discard the fat that comes out of the sausages that is). I'm thinking that the sausage casings could ...


7

It takes more heat/time to safely cook sausage than it does to fully cook eggs. This would be especially true for omelettes, where the egg is in contact with the hot pan, and the filling only warms indirectly. Add your expectation to start with cold sausage, and cooking the sausage and egg at the same time seems like a really bad idea. (Yes, you could just ...


6

Take the sausage when it is still frozen, run a few seconds under hot water, take the end and start sliding casing down. Perfect sausage and ready to go. If the sausage is thawed out it will break. Works and sausage is so much easier to eat.


6

Black pudding freezes very well and should keep for a couple of months easily. It is not cured like salamis or other hard sausages, it's just boiled in the skin, so it does not keep as well at ambient temperatures. When you do cook it, try it with pork tenderloin, mashed potato and fresh apple sauce. Just fry half-inch slices. Fantastic.


6

Now you made the edit, it is clearer to me what you ask. Here the answers to your two questions: 2) They don't need any agents. Protein acts as a glue when heated. Protein is almost the only food type which will actually "glue" things together - try making gluten-free pancakes with non-protein flour like almond flour and you will notice what I mean. (You ...


6

Cheese Kranksy or Kasekrainer is the common sausage with cheese. Around 10% cheese seems typical They taste great, and are very popular with children


6

With any game I automatically think about avoiding overcooking as it is quite lean, however any sausage may have fat added to it to prevent it drying out, so a simple look at your sausage should tell you how much fat it has. If it is really dark with very little white in it then there's little fat and you need to make sure you don't overcook them, if there's ...


6

Good Yorkshire pudding is not an art, it's a science. You need three things: Hot fat A hot oven Batter of the right consistency The only raising agent in Yorkshire Pudding is steam from the water in the liquid ingredients. You need to convert that water into steam fast to get a good rise, and you need the batter to crisp up quickly so it doesn't collapse. ...


6

Substitution in preserved foods are generally considered unsafe. Food chemistry is a complicated affair, and cooking is inherently imprecise. Sure, you can find a way to reduce the pH to that of the original recipe. But a salami is a fermented food. Your pH might be the same, but other things will change, for example the composition of the available sugars, ...


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