33

Your scallops are (beautifully) seared on the outside because they are cooked all the way through in a very hot pan. The scallops in the Chinese stir fries stay pale because most of their cooking is done at low heat. They are likely cooked twice: first they are velveted (meaning marinated and oil-blanched) and then very quickly stir fried to reheat. In more ...


30

The scallops in the first two photos were left on the pan, with no movement, to sear on one side before flipping. To achieve that caramelization takes a couple of minutes before turning. In fact, at that point, the scallop is mostly cooked. In the second two photos, the scallop is likely stir-fried in a wok; that is, it is in constant motion over high ...


21

Add the lemon juice at service, either in the serving dish or on the plate. Your first 2 methods will probably end up with most of the juice in the steamer water underneath. For 3: meat doesn't really soak up flavours quite as much as you'd expect when marinating - plus whatever is on the surface will again mainly end up back in the steamer water.


8

In addition to the great recommendations above, I'd point out that I'm not sure it's possible to replicate the flavor you had with griddled scallops plus lemon when you are steaming them. While you wouldn't think this would matter (lemon is lemon, right?), the grilling process involves oils, browning, and probably a bit more salt; the lemon gives a great ...


8

To add lemon flavor, try a sprinkle of finely grated zest. Be careful, a little goes a long way. My favorite tool for zesting is a microplane. Watch out for wax coating on lemons - choosing organic lemons might be your best bet.


6

Since the original recipe does not say explicitly that the scallops should be cooked from a frozen state, you should thaw them in the refrigerator before making the dish. Do not precook them—just thaw them, and cook them as per the recipe. You will also want to pat them dry with a paper towel or lint free towel, so that they are as dry as reasonably ...


5

At end he squeezed fresh lemon on them, and I could taste fresh lemon in scallops! You recall he squeezed the juice at the end, but 2/3 of the methods you tried involves adding lemon very early in the cooking process, and the 3rd method has it added still while it is cooking. The reason you tasted fresh lemon is because the lemon had just been freshly added....


5

Regarding the scallops shrinking, it could simply be the difference in dry vs. wet scallops. Most grocery stores sell wet scallops. At times, dry scallops can be quite hard to find at retail. Wet scallops naturally shrink because of the loss of so much moisture when cooking. Also, the higher the heat and longer the cook time, the more the moisture is lost.


4

Technically, this "fishy" smell is there because it's no longer fresh. Here's a link that scientifically explains what causes the "fishy odour" in our seafood. Below is a layman term of explaining the fishy smell. Have you ever been to fish market for example in Singapore? There's always a slight lingering"fishy" smell (let's be honest), because the fish ...


4

If that is 1/4 cup lemon juice, that seems like quite a lot and reducing it is also probably making it taste even more lemony. If you want to keep about the same amount of liquid, try softening the shallots and garlic in 1 t olive oil and then adding 2T dry white wine and reducing. Add 1T lemon juice and bring to boil again but don't reduce, add in the ...


3

Shellfish is usually somewhat sweet in flavour. Acidity is the natural balance to sweetness.


3

My question was answered about letting my scallops warm up a little at room temperature. But searing scallops all the way through makes them tough as shoe leather. First of all, I pat my scallops as dry as possible before putting in the skillet. What I do is sear my scallops until a nice brown occur on one side, not moving them around. And then flip ...


2

I deep fry mine in tempura batter at my restaurant as Garnish for my scallop dish, give a different texture to The dish.


1

Flavor is really best when you can reinforce that flavor with multiple layers. Lemon flavor changes when it is cooked. The zest and juice are both distinctly "lemony" and both have their own unique flavor. Also: make sure you're salting your scallops before you steam them. The human sensation of taste depends on the presence of salt. To make simply steamed ...


1

I would avoid using red wine in a recipe that calls for white. Whites and Reds taste different, so you should expect a switch from white to red to be reflected in the finished dish. And, it will also change the color/presentation. I was taught that white wine can be substituted with water and vinegar mixed in equal amounts, along with a small amount of sugar ...


1

Depending on what you want to achieve (decreasing the acidic taste or increasing the pH) it could be as simple as adding a dash of honey or baking soda respectively...


1

Scallop roe parfait is a firm favorite in my kitchen. Gently poach the roe then blitz with soft butter and whatever spices/flavours take your fancy. Then set in a mould lined with cling film. We use small PVC pipe to set it as it's a garnish for dish. But served by itself spread on toast is a real treat for everyone


1

I always use the roes, an interesting way to use them is cook them seperately, and in a different way to add another dimension to your dish, for example, i char grill the Scallop meat, and just before serving, i pan fry the roes in garlic,lemon, chilli and parsley butter, and serve with them, on a rocket and herb salad...Fantastic!!


1

Its normal for scallops to stick to a non-stick surface sautee pan. Let them sit until they come loose from the pan. It may take a few minutes but when they do thei will be browned perfectly. Turn and cook another 2 min. on the other side and spoon melted butter over them during this time. YUMMM!


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