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4

Once snails are cooked, they can simply be extracted from the shell with a skewer or a tiny fork. Poke into the flesh, pull if necessary, lift it out. This YouTube video shows it at 3:55 for sea snails (Babylonia areata), the same principle applies for other maritime snails like winkles and land snails, aka the famous escargot. In fine dining, the restaurant ...


3

Clams and other bivalve molluscs are filter feeders. The siphon is their way of getting food and getting rid of waste. Basically what they do is suck water in through one part of the siphon, filter the particles out for food using modified gills, and then get rid of the excess water out of the other part. In addition, the siphon also supplies oxygenated ...


3

As long as you make certain you keep the oyster whole and you keep water/liquor form the oysters, one way or the other is more or less equivalent. The shell, at that point is just a small dish. Lot of high end restaurants (L'atelier Robuchon for example) will shuck the oyster and prepare them separately and then plate the dishes by placing back the prepared ...


3

You should follow your recipe if you have one - for reference, I looked at these: 1, 2, 3. One recipe specifies quickly poaching your oysters with ginger, spring onion, and a splash of cooking wine, this is an optional step but may remove some fishiness (or 腥味) from the oysters. Next, dredge your oysters in cornstarch (you could also use potato starch) and ...


1

Snails aren't a common dish around here, but I remember seeing someone eating them on some TV show (might've been a travel show, like Rick Steves), and the person with them mentioned that you had to spin them in a certain direction based on the direction of the spiral of the snail. (I think it was with the spiral, but it might've been opposite to the spiral)...


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