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24

Given your picture, I think the correct term here is saute; that is, to quickly fry in a little bit of hot fat. Pan frying uses more fat, and a lower temperature, to create a deeper crust. Probably an overkill for mussels. For a saute, you want relatively dry (pat dry with towel if necessary - frozen seafood can release a lot of water) ingredients, ...


15

An important element to cooking fish is the quality of the fish itself. Many fish processors use sodium tripolyphosphate (STPP) to preserve the fish. Unfortunately this also makes the fish absorb water. What you end up cooking is a "balloon" filled with water. As soon as the proteins begin shrinking, the excess water is expelled quickly which ...


15

You say In the advertisements the chefs just swirl the mussels, shrimps, and octopus pieces around and produce some tasty browned pieces That's like saying "When I watch Bob Ross, he just puts paint on the brush, then moves the brush on the canvas, and a landscape emerges. I tried it and no landscape came out." What you are missing is not ...


9

Squeeze it. This is frozen seafood. Freezing food creates tiny sharp ice crystals that break a lot of the cell walls, and releases trapped moisture. When you defrost you need to squeeze all that loose moisture out or you'll end up boiling rather than frying. So squeeze the seafood between some paper towels or with a clean dishcloth. Then wash the cloth to ...


7

That's abalone (鮑魚 bàoyú), a popular and expensive delicacy in Chinese cuisine.


4

Clams and other bivalve molluscs are filter feeders. The siphon is their way of getting food and getting rid of waste. Basically what they do is suck water in through one part of the siphon, filter the particles out for food using modified gills, and then get rid of the excess water out of the other part. In addition, the siphon also supplies oxygenated ...


4

Once snails are cooked, they can simply be extracted from the shell with a skewer or a tiny fork. Poke into the flesh, pull if necessary, lift it out. This YouTube video shows it at 3:55 for sea snails (Babylonia areata), the same principle applies for other maritime snails like winkles and land snails, aka the famous escargot. In fine dining, the restaurant ...


3

When cooking mixed seafood on pan, I always heat the pan with sunflower oil (can be butter) until it's completely covered with hot oil, and then the cooking must be with high fire for a very short amount of time, you will have to taste one of them - once its edible - it's ready. Don't forget to stir all the time. It's very sensitive food.


3

As long as you make certain you keep the oyster whole and you keep water/liquor form the oysters, one way or the other is more or less equivalent. The shell, at that point is just a small dish. Lot of high end restaurants (L'atelier Robuchon for example) will shuck the oyster and prepare them separately and then plate the dishes by placing back the prepared ...


3

You should follow your recipe if you have one - for reference, I looked at these: 1, 2, 3. One recipe specifies quickly poaching your oysters with ginger, spring onion, and a splash of cooking wine, this is an optional step but may remove some fishiness (or 腥味) from the oysters. Next, dredge your oysters in cornstarch (you could also use potato starch) and ...


3

Despite the name, swamp eels are not true eels, and hence they are unrelated to the Japanese eel (unagi). As far as I can tell they are also unknown in Japan and not used for food there. That said, the Japanese kabayaki style of cooking most commonly associated with eels is also applied to any number of long, skinny, fishy creatures. So I'd say give it a ...


2

"should I use fresh or dried whelks", well you can use whatever you want. But there will be a difference. Why is this even a question? Let's address a couple points. Why is dried seafood used (Whelks, abalone, scallops, etc.)?: Storage and transportation: In the days before refrigeration, refrigerated trucks / trains were available (and still in ...


2

The recipe in the video appears to cook the squid entirely, then mix it into the rest of the dish, then continue to cook the entire dish. (I suspect the recipe's creator has different expectations regarding the final texture of cooked squid) Overcooked squid will be tough or rubbery whenever over cooked, whether too hot, too long, or both (which will happen ...


1

As you mentioned, you have some problems with frying in general, so I wil give some points to take into account that apply to frying in general. First I must admit that I don't have much experience frying seafood because I don't like it too much, but frying and sautéing things is one of my favourite ways to prepare food. Most of the time, you want whatever ...


1

Soak first, then debeard. I'm not sure that there is any real difference but everyone I've worked with, from grandmother to chef, from fisherman to fireman has done it that way. And there is something to be said for an amassed amount of experience. One last to add though (and this is why I say that I'm not sure there is any real difference) is that while I ...


1

Snails aren't a common dish around here, but I remember seeing someone eating them on some TV show (might've been a travel show, like Rick Steves), and the person with them mentioned that you had to spin them in a certain direction based on the direction of the spiral of the snail. (I think it was with the spiral, but it might've been opposite to the spiral)...


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