Hot answers tagged

38

The first thing is to do is thaw them properly before you cook them, half frozen vegetables will cool your pan too much. I often thaw frozen vegetables by soaking them in hot tap water, this is pretty quick and doesn't scorch them like microwaving them might. This might take a bit more time than microwaving but it's a much better result. You will never get ...


18

The little bit (about 4 - 5 grams after cooking) of fat in the breast itself will render out faster, and you could end up with a dryer over-crispy duck breast by the time it's done in the center. A tiny ding shouldn't present a problem, but if you actually get the whole or most of the edge of the blade into the breast, you'll have to pay close attention to ...


18

The method you describe should work, timing wise you have it about right, except it will need longer if you are aiming for well done. Salting and oiling before cooking works well, as does letting the meat come up to room temperature (if you are aiming for rare medium-rare a cold steak isn't a bad thing as it lets you char the outside more while having the ...


10

Yes, you need to place the meat in a system which can keep more heat. This means 1) more mass, and 2) less conduction. This is generally done with cast iron pans, because they are great for that purpose. You have to wait until they are properly heated, but once they are there, adding food does not faze them and they keep the original temperature pretty ...


9

Avoid non-stick pans. Heat the pan before you place the meat or fat in the pan. Use medium to medium high heat. Add fat (oil, butter, for example). Add the meat (pat dry), but don't crowd the pan. Cook in batches if necessary, but too many (more than 2 or 3?) will mean that the fond will burn, so you may need a bigger pan, or two pans. Place meat in ...


8

Use a heavy bottomed pan. Heat pan medium high. Add oil. Place chicken skin side down. Don't move the chicken. Once you see browning, gently see if the chicken releases. If it does not, leave it. It should release with some gentle nudging, but it should not be moved if it doesn't release. Usually the issue arises when the meat is flipped or removed ...


7

Most recipes I am aware of simply press crushed pepper onto the steak. It is true that some will fall off, but these recipes apply pepper generously with that in mind. I have not come across the egg white method (not sure I want egg white on my steak), but I did see a recipe that adds crushed pepper to melted butter, then coating the steak with the mixture, ...


6

If you are asking how to prevent the oil from smoking while making a good steak: you can't. The pan for proper searing of steak has to go hotter than the smoking point of any cooking oil. So, if you don't want to consume oil which has been taken above its smoking point, you cannot eat seared steak. You can make steak in a coldish pan (not hearing a sizzle ...


6

I always do my steak in cast iron, but instead of oil I use salt. Yes, you read that right, no oil in the pan. At all. The salt provides seasoning and prevents the steak from 'sticking' to the skillet. You can preheat your skillet over a medium heat to cut down on the smoke, yes even without oil, there's still smoke. But what I found is that the hotter the ...


6

Yes, but I don't know if there's an official name for it. We do this a lot in pressure cooking, to get the appealing mallard reactions (caramelization). Typically, after cooking you can put the meat under the broiler to crisp it up (common examples are a whole chicken or carnitas). Example recipe for Carnitas: https://callhimyeschef.com/2013/02/19/carnitas-...


4

If you are frying sausages on a hot pan then it's very hard to brown them on all sides for a couple of reasons: the curved shape will cause it to flop along the curve, they are hard to stand up if you do get them stood up only the small area touching the pan will get color So you are frying on a flat pan you can spend a lot of time messing around trying to ...


4

Practice, practice, practice. More specifically: The searing will make the piece a bit flakier and less cohesive around the edges, so it requires a more delicate touch than raw tuna. So... if you aren't already, holding the knife properly for maximum control helps. Look at "The Blade Grip" here. using longer knife strokes with very little pressure helps ...


4

One additional factor: moisture. The more there is on the exterior of your chicken, the more energy is lost turning that moisture into steam. Try patting your chicken dry with paper towels or just a clean dish towel before frying. That is probably only a part of your problem though, a drop from 350 to 250 probably means you need more thermal mass in the pan ...


4

That seems like a big drop. Some temperature drop is expected. The temperature and mass of the chicken is a factor. Don't use frozen chicken. You could pull the chicken from the fridge a few minutes before and let it warm up a bit. But just a few minutes for food safety. Add more mass / heat capacitance to the pan as covered by rumtscho. The target ...


4

The (alleged) problem with extra fat during SV is that, flavor molecules will dissolve in fat and subsequently be discarded. The claim is that, this causes the loss of flavor. For searing it’s fine to use butter or other fat.


4

If you don't feel like waiting for them to thaw, you can submerge the bag in hot water like @GdD mentioned. I prefer steaming frozen vegetables however. The trick is properly steaming them though. I love using the frozen steamables, I just pop them in the microwave for the set time and they're always cooked perfectly. But if the bag of frozen veggies isn'...


4

I think there is a place for both. Without being aware of the particulars of this received wisdom/commandments from on high, it is a little hard to say. Seasoning of meat is often performed before searing (think steaks), but this is commonly only in the form of a thin layer of salt and pepper and maybe herbs too, not a thick complete covering. I have also ...


4

Searing frozen meat is fine, and is a useful way to get a good sear without overcooking the inside (since you can sear for longer, and at a lower temperature). There are no food safety issues I can think of which would apply to short ribs but not steaks, particularly since the former are cooked for longer at a higher internal temperature. The only problem I ...


3

There has been quite a bit of back and forth among chefs on whether to salt meat well-before cooking (up to 24 hours) or immediately before cooking. You might find this interesting. The article points out, according to Harold McGee, that a large amount of salt (typically the amounts used for curing) does indeed draw out moisture, however, the small amount ...


3

The fond is a great flavor component. It forms from the Maillard reaction browning the surface of the food. These bits then are incorporated into pan sauces and stocks, etc... This is usually through de-glazing with a liquid, such as wine, stock or vinegar. First step is to have the meat come to room temperature before putting in the pan. If it is cold, ...


3

"Better" is a matter of opinion. Recipes for bolognese vary widely. Both methods are possible. Try it both ways, see which one you prefer. My practice is that the meat is not seared. Because of the nature of the recipe, I usually have a lot of meat, it would certainly take longer to sear it in batches, as opposed to dumping it all in with the sweated ...


3

If your oil catches fire, it is indeed too hot. But still, you cannot make a good steak without reaching the smoking point. "the temperature definitely isn't anything to write home about" - here you are wrong. Whether the tempreature is too much, too little, or just right, that's something you recognize by the behavior of your food. If your oil billows ...


3

The secret is to oil the steak, not the pan. You only need enough to make good contact until the steak starts to produce some juices, which is less than a minute. Adding oil to the steak means the oil is exactly where you need it to be, and you aren't using any more than you need.


2

Are you sure tilapia steak can be eaten medium rare? I'm 100% sure that tilapia must not be eaten half cooked. Half cooked fish has a lot of bacterial such as bacterial bathogens, parasite, natural toxin etc. Please be careful because tilapia isn't a sushi grade fish. All tilapia in japanese cuisine or any cuisine in the world must be fully cooked. ...


2

Because of their shape (usually shaped like a banana), searing a sausage on all sides can be difficult. If the sausages roll around in your pan, maybe your cooking surface is not level ? There are usually two ways to cook sausages You can boil or not your sausages before grilling them. hot and quick (and a lot of splatter): you need to stay near your ...


2

They are done for unique reasons Salting meat draws out some of the water content. It is actually also good practice to pat dry the meat before searing. This lets you get a better sear on the meat. Overly moist foods will release their water into the oil when cooking and the water will start evaporate steaming your meat (which is not what you want.) You ...


2

If the oil is of too low temperature, it'll have a tendency to get soaked up by the food you're preparing or get evaporated together with the water that's leaking out, so that's where it's disappearing. (Some vegetables like eggplant, zucchini, ... tend to soak up oil like sponges regardless of the temperature.) To test whether the oil is hot enough, I ...


2

You're going to have some loss to be honest, it's the nature of the recipe. Egg white may help attach it but the flavor and texture are just wrong. Some things you can do are: Barbecue the meat, or use a grill pan: less contact with a cooking surface means less pepper gets rubbed off Use the right size cracked pepper: really big pieces tend to fall off, ...


2

If you sear the meat in the pressure cooker before putting the lid on, then the flavoring from the seared tidbits and caramelization will assist in bringing a fuller flavor to the finished recipe. This is the same technique I use when I cook something in my Dutch Oven (as a substitute for my slow cooker). Instead of trying to transfer everything into the ...


2

It does take a couple of minutes to get a good crust with a torch, but judging by that photo something went wrong as there’s little crust on that picture. As aris mentioned, you need to ensure that there is no moisture on the steak. You mentioned adding butter on top and letting it melt at room temperature. This could act as a barrier for the heat but no ...


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