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Serious Eats published a great article on how to cook, sear, and season their perfect steak! TL;DR Salt your steak and rest it on a wire-rack for 40+ minutes (ideally in a fridge overnight) before searing. If you can't do that, your next best bet is to salt immediately before searing. If you're curious to know the science behind it, here's what happens after ...


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You have two options: salt the meat either long enough in advance (this will depend strongly on the cut of meat, but I have seen recommendations for salting up to two days ahead). This way, the salt has time to penetrate the meat. You can then dab off surface moisture with a paper towel Alternatively, salt the meat right before searing, so there is no time ...


7

The concept that a "crust" on meat is protection for moisture loss is a myth. So, searing meat before roasting or braising is not a step to prevent drying. You may, however, want to sear to develop color and flavor. Depending on your recipe, this can be an important step. When using sous vide, you have three options. A sear before the sous vide ...


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"Une poêle" (pronounced "pwal") is a frying pan, so we have the verb "poêler"(pronounced "pwale") which means to cook in the pan. So we use the word "poêlée" (pronounced "pwale") for anything cooked in a pan, with a more or less reasonable amount of fat, generally at a medium to high heat. In the ...


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This is going to be dominated by ergonomics. The perfect fan for exhaust isn't so perfect if you're always banging your head on it, or can't see in the pan. Some unusual devices are rather tall and wouldn't even fit in your 18" (I can't strain jelly on the worktop because of the cupboards so do that on the cold stove). In catering, where kitchen air ...


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