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2

It's a bit late, but for your next attempt, you might want to try a 'reverse sear', where you cook it slowly first in the oven, then finish it in a hot pan. This should help you prevent overcooking it. (although the article says that steaks thinner than 1.5 inches are a problem using this technique, I suspect that the thinner steaks would still be better ...


1

I make these for breakfast all the time. Consider 1: Dredge steak in flour before pan. Salt and pepper. This will make tasty brown bits on the outside. It is a pan fried steak after all. 2: Use butter to cook. Warm it up and fry steaks in butter. 3: Picky people might be picky about garlic; too much or too little. I love garlic but for picky ...


0

I find the following works well for searing any kind of meat: A well seasoned cast iron pan (personal preference as I was raised cooking on these). Get the pan good and hot! Make sure there is some sort of oil (personally I use a seasoned butter to match the final desired taste of the meal). In order to reduce the amount of smoke generated I both turn on ...


0

Don't leave the oil smoking in the pan. Once it's heated up, which takes just a few seconds, throw the steak on it. That alone will cool the pan down. As for smoke, it's perfectly normal for a lot of smoke to happen when searing steak in a pan. If there's no smoke your heat is probably too low. If your kitchen cannot handle smoke (weak fan), don't try to ...


18

The method you describe should work, timing wise you have it about right, except it will need longer if you are aiming for well done. Salting and oiling before cooking works well, as does letting the meat come up to room temperature (if you are aiming for rare medium-rare a cold steak isn't a bad thing as it lets you char the outside more while having the ...


3

The secret is to oil the steak, not the pan. You only need enough to make good contact until the steak starts to produce some juices, which is less than a minute. Adding oil to the steak means the oil is exactly where you need it to be, and you aren't using any more than you need.


3

If your oil catches fire, it is indeed too hot. But still, you cannot make a good steak without reaching the smoking point. "the temperature definitely isn't anything to write home about" - here you are wrong. Whether the tempreature is too much, too little, or just right, that's something you recognize by the behavior of your food. If your oil billows ...


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