23

There are two parts to this question, the stated part, and the unstated "are you really frying an egg if there is no oil?" For the first part, most manufacturers of non-stick pans claim that their product makes oil unnecessary, and generally I've found that to be true. A little oil helps, but "necessary" might be a stretch. To maximize your non-stickyness ...


19

Cast iron care need not seem so intimidating or mystical. There are lots of ways to take care of it, and though many will profess their own gospel and taboos associated with cast iron cookware, many different solutions will work. You just need to understand some of the basic principles and the rest is personal preference. First, in my naivete I used ...


14

This is the microstructure of SAE 304, a steel type commonly used in pans: At this magnification, its "pores" look like cracks. Now see it at other magnifications (still a SAE 304, other types of steel look completely different, especially if you look at martenistic steels): It gets even more complicated than that, because steel structure differs between ...


14

I work for a carbon steel cookware producer in China and just like Athanasius, I too have become interested in the question of "Do pan “pores” exist, what are they, and what are their effects?" I have also watched the RouxBe video about making a stainless steel pan more non-stick through pre-heating. To summarize the main point, it says to heat the pan until ...


12

The best is flax oil. The next best is soybean oil. The third best is liquid canola (not hydrogenated Crisco). This is because of where those oils are listed on iodine index; which is a measure of how much an oil will polymerize. Polymerization is when oil turns into plastic and is the actual chemical process responsible for "seasoning". Here's a whole ...


12

Steel wool, or other scouring pads, are made of quite small, rougher metal fibers or ribbons that will get into much smaller spaces, and clean away much smaller bits of matter, which includes the "seasoning" that coats your pan and/or the metal surface itself. In contrast, the chainmail links are much larger, and each link's surface is relatively smooth ...


12

As you pointed out in your question, Lodge A-Spray is 100% canola oil. It is also in a non-aerosol container. Those two things mean that you have no added propellants or ingredients. Most cooking sprays are not 100% oil. Most contain a additional ingredients, some of which would actually be a negative in trying to build your seasoning. Soy lecithin, for ...


10

Cast iron frying pans are the only kind I own, and based on your photos I don't think you need to start over with the seasoning. Cast iron is tough as nails, you can always rescue it so long as you don't drop it and crack the pan, and it's easy to care for and maintain. In this case you can just clean them well and put down another layer of oil. I would ...


9

This coating is not the same thing as a seasoning. Iron rusts when exposed to air. For cooking purposes, you season it, and it prevents rusting. Some manufacturers sell their iron cookware pre-seasoned, but others use other types of coating to prevent rust. This other coating can consist of wax or petroleum products such as parafin. Its only purpose is to ...


9

Seasoning pans is a method for preventing rust, and it has nothihng to do with food safety. It is done once in a pan's lifetime, and only repaired if it flakes off. There is no prescription in food safety to cook in sterilized vessels. The germs you eat come from the food, not from the pans. Even if a colony were to form in the pan at some point (what ...


9

Short answer: No, you cannot season enameled cast iron cookware. Enamel does not take seasoning in the same sense as cast iron or carbon steel. I don't know if seasoning would *hurt" the pan, but I've never heard of anyone seasoning their enamel cookware. So if you do try it though, let us know how it goes. If you’re gonna season, just buy cast iron and ...


8

No. Neither plain stainless steel nor non-stick pans (which yours is as it's coated with Teflon) need to be seasoned. Not only is seasoning unnecessary, but it will only cause your pan to look dirty. It would do no good at all. Seasoning is all about preventing rust and sealing "pores", making the surface more resistant to sticking. Neither of those things ...


8

I would say the opposite and you have actually burned "off" the coating. When those woks come off the factory floor, they are dipped or sprayed with that anti-rust sealant you are talking about. Most if not all instructions want you to get rid of this coating before use. When using carbon steel/cast iron cookware, one must season the metal first. Here ...


8

It helps keep the pan clean. I know in my cooking, there's always a chance of something dripping, something splashing, few drops running down the side, which might need wiping up with a damp towel or can just be ignored (and left there). not to mention the possibility of moisture in the air. And unseasoned metal can rust. The first pan I had, I ...


8

I would not heat up a large cast iron press - too much to go wrong there, little benefit. You are not frying on the thing. Clean any oil/rust that's on it, dry carefully, oil it with mineral oil or wax it with beeswax (or paraffin wax, but beeswax will probably stick better,) use it, clean it up well, dry very carefully, and re-oil/wax before storage.


8

As per @Joe's comment you don't season enameled cookware. I did a Google search on this cookware. Per the specs, the inside is enameled. And nowhere in the description or specs could I find any reference to the pan being pre-seasoned. (Which makes sense for an enameled pan.) Additionally, I found nothing claiming that the pan is non-stick. Here's a link to ...


7

AFAIK you need to heat the pan to let the oil oxidize and polymerize¹ so that it will form a chemically protective and non-sticking coating. If you wash your cookware with soap you will have to do it every time. For that reason some people don't wash cast iron at all and wipe it with a clean cloth or paper towel after using. (Burned oil is apparently not ...


7

I strongly advise against doing it. I tried stovetop seasoning at home and got terrible results. A stove gives you hot spots - on gas, this will be the ring where the flame touches the metal. The temperature of the metal in this hot spot is way too high, and the oil burns instead of polymerizing. You get some oil-charcoal in this place, which doesn't have ...


7

It looks like your pan needs a hard cleaning and a re-seasoning. I run into this about once every 2-3 months (depending on how much I use it). My tried and true method is to break some rules at this quarterly cleaning. I'll scrub with an abrasive scotch-brite, SOS Pads or similar scrubbing pad. During this time I often use about a quarter cub of baking soda,...


7

How to remove old seasoning and start over from scratch? Very few cases actually require a full stripping of cast iron and restarting your seasoning from scratch. If you ruined your seasoning somehow, it can usually just be fixed by scrubbing and baking on a fresh layer of oil or two. However here are a few real reasons: 1) The pan is new, and you don't ...


7

Seasoning the handle and outside helps resist RUSTING your cast iron. The 'varnish' (partially oxidized/polymerized oils) is hydrophobic, and helps avoid rusting your iron. But do please dry your cast iron as soon as you wash it. I do the handle/outside about a quarter of the times when I reseason.


7

Then you aren't using "low to medium heat". The heat is defined by how quickly your food cooks, not by the setting on the stove. Lower your heat until the food fries at a reasonable rate. As for the oil, if in doubt, err on the side of adding a bit more than you think you'll need.


6

Although I can't lay claim to what exactly is "normal," I can say that on the occasions that I wipe the cast-iron pan which I use for basically everything on a near-daily basis with a paper towel, it never comes back free of some kind of residue (usually more of a dark brown for me), even after I've cleaned it in the way you describe. I've been using my ...


6

You may notice the black residue if you fry eggs in the pan as well. Most likely, the black residue is charred (greasy) food sticking to the seasoned oil. Since Flaxseed oil has low heat tolerance, it could be that disintegrating, too. Otherwise it could be related to the iron in the cast iron which isn't bad for you (some say even good). a) Is it ...


6

You don't need to season an enameled pot. The enamel serves much of the same purpose as building up a layer of seasoning. Although the enamel won't ever be quite as slick as seasoned cast iron, it protects the vessel from rust, makes food less likely to stick (with a little help from some oil), and easier to clean up afterwards.


6

That looks a lot more like cooked oil than rust on the inside. Either way, probably not rust, and definitely not enough rust to cause concern. Scrub it off. When I season my cast iron, I just do it on the stove. I heat the pan until it's smoking, and carefully add a little oil and swirl it around. Let it cool, wipe it out. Then, use it. When you do use it, ...


6

To best check temperature, you need a thermometer, and if you can, use a non-contact thermometer (infrared thermometer). Teflon start degrading at around 260 °C (500 °F). So check the pan temperature, adjust the heat of your range (electric, gas...) so that the temperature stay below that. If you want to use high temperature for some applications, then ...


6

Place your cast iron pan upside down in your oven and run the 'Oven Clean Cycle'. Wash with dish detergent and dry with heat. Reinitiate a proper seasoning. If your oven doesn't have a clean cycle, use the highest heat setting available and bake for a few hours.


5

I will disagree with the top answers here and say that it is best to look for something saturated, with low iodine value. I personally stand by lard, but there are other options. The advice that suggests high iodine oils is based on their easy polymerisation. So, if you don't execute your process perfectly, you end up with a polymer layer for a high iodine ...


5

I don't think those are "cracked ridges"; I think you have a hammered wok. The appearance is an artifact of how they are manufacted, by hammering a steel blank into a form or mold. It probably is a carbon steel wok, as that is the most common material used for the hammering method as far as I know. According to this article at The Kitchn, you should ...


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