59

A cast iron skillet which is regularly washed in the dishwasher will be progressively stripped down to bare metal, which will quickly and consistently rust. It will not be usable for cooking until you clean it of the rust and re-season it. Incidentally, I think you might be confused by the term "seasoning". Seasoning consists of polymerized oil, ...


16

First, about the literal question in the title. I would go farther than Sneftel: almost no cast iron skillet is so perfectly seasoned that the metal is perfectly sealed. The seasoning is good enough for protection against air, but dishwasher powder dissolved in warm water is super corrosive to iron. Already in the first wash, you will likely get some rust ...


9

It looks like the second attempt used far too much oil, which can lead to all sorts of uneven spots in the pan. Seasoning that thick tends to flake off when you cook with the pan. I would strip it and reseason immediately. In general you want to use a very very thin layer of oil, wiping out the excess from the pan with an absorbent cloth (I don't like using ...


5

The idea with the onions is unlikely to work as intended, and you'd be off just as well if you simply kept basting the sides instead. Your best bet is to season the wok upside down in the oven for the most even seasoning result. The way to protect your wooden handle is to wrap it thoroughly in a wet towel, and wrap that in tin foil. The towel will dissapate ...


4

To the question as asked: No, there are no more tricks. When you use the wrong tool for the job (in this case a too-small electric hob), then you can't expect the job to go well. Nevertheless, there is an easy solution for you: Use the oven. If you are that worried about your rubber button, remove it before putting the pan in the oven, and pop it back in ...


4

An iron pan is one single piece of substance. It just stays the way it was cast. A patch of rust is a brittle, powdery substance. It will crumble with time, pieces of it falling off, no matter if they have a bit of seasoning on top or not. So, you will end up with these spots being "naked" again. Additional to that, in any kind of applying coatings ...


3

From previous experience, salt was used on seasoned pans as a means of cleaning off a pan's cooking residue while still on the cooking line. This enables keeping pans working without going to the dishwasher. With regard to using salt as a means to making it non stick, I believe the salt restores the non stick pan seasoning. A coating of oil may have been ...


3

The way to evaluate the contradictory claims is to find a source who did careful, controlled-variable testing of flaxseed oil vs. other oils for seasoning cast iron. Neither of the sources cited in those questions is such a source; one is a chemist who arrived at flaxseed based on chemical knowledge but didn't compare with anything else, and one is a ...


2

...so, the difference is applying a layer of oil, and frying some onions, vs. heating a layer of oil to the smoke point six times? Seasoning is about creating a layer of polymerized oil that protects the pan, and ideally, creates a non-stick surface. I don't know if you need 6 "layers", as you can build up the surface as you use the pan, but I ...


2

A surface insulating layer (whether deliberate anodising, natural oxidation, or seasoning) will only really affect the heat flow through that layer from the bulk metal into the food on top. It won't affect the heat-spreading effect used for even cooking, and it won't affect the heat capacity. So now we're considering the difference between various surface ...


2

You really have to combine all those stages in one. If you have to wet it at all, rather than just wipe it out after use, then dry it on the heat, wipe round some oil [the smallest amount you can manage] then heat it until it smokes off. Cool & store. The only way to truly avoid gummy oil is not to have any oil left, only seasoning.


2

Whilst the re-seasoning part could be considered a duplicate, that's not actually what this question asks. It's "What do I do with the existing surface?" You sand it off, or you get it sandblasted professionally (or you get all chemistry class with lye baths & other potentially dangerous stuff;). The cosmetic appearance is not vital, but your ...


1

Based on experience with a carbon steel pan, which, as far as I know, is equivalent to cast iron in these regards: If you wash it in the dishwasher regularly, and do not season it, you will just have a bare piece of non-stainless steel. This will have no non-sticking properties and will stick badly even if you add plenty of oil/butter for cooking; and it ...


1

If it feels sticky to the touch after you've washed and dried it, give it a scrub-down with a steel scourer until that stickiness is reduced. You do not have to go all the way down to bare metal, or even achieve a consistent appearance of the surface - just get rid of any major bumps and ridges. Rinse and dry. You'll now have to re-season the whole pan. ...


1

A couple of points… I wouldn't have expected a brand new pan to immediately warp, especially at only 180°. I don't use induction, but on gas I expect a frying pan to last at least a year before I have to stand in the middle of it to flatten it down. A good saucepan never warps, a good frying pan will a bit eventually, because it gets a lot of fierce heat. I ...


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