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26

Salt is perhaps the most basic and effective flavour enhancer, and so it's fairly obvious why we have it on our dinner tables. The popularity of pepper is down to the Romans, who were crazy about it. Thanks to the longevity of the Roman Empire, pepper was imported for hundreds of years, helping to establish it as the most popular spice, and keeping the ...


21

Summary for the Quick Reader Only the shape and size of the grains really makes a difference. Otherwise, salt is salt. What makes a difference between salts? There are only two real differentiators between different types of salt (assuming the product is essentially just salt, and not a seasoning blend): The mineral or other impurities resulting from ...


21

Add your preferred level of salt and pepper Seasoning usually refers to salt and black pepper, but occasionally to other flavor-enhancing ingredients in the dish such as acid (vinegar, lemon, etc.) and heat (red pepper, sriracha, etc.). "To taste" means to the degree you enjoy it.


20

In a traditional British chip shop, you would have got your chips (fries for Americans) in yesterday's newspaper, wrapped into a cone shape. These days of course, it's food grade greaseproof paper, but it's still in the same shape. I suspect the reason for serving chips in a cone is that simple tradition. Also, there may be thermal reasons, that it allows ...


14

Well, you could make your own onion powder. It isn't that difficult. Peel and finely chop your onions. Then, spread the onion pieces out on a tray and heat in a 150°F degree oven or in a food dehydrator until dry. Tip: The onions are dry when you can easily crumble the chopped pieces in your hand. Allow the onions to cool. Then, ...


14

By "Italian Sausage" I think you mean the seasoned pork sausage available in many supermarkets throughout the US. I've found that a 30-70 mix of beef and turkey/chicken works reasonably well as a substitute when pork is not available. Beef is too strong a flavor and turkey too weak in its own. Flavor-wise most italian sausage has red wine, fennel, and ...


13

I have (nearly) no sense of taste and smell, and what sense I do have is heavily distorted. As a result, my senses are non-indicative of dish quality. Nearly every meal I cook is shared with at least one person, though, so I've had to adapt. I iterate over the same recipe over and over varying the spice mixtures and ratios, and ask for comment every time. I ...


12

You have overcooked the seasoning. I have done this once or twice too. Especially smooth surfaces (e.g. carbon steel) are very prone to this problem, unlike rough cast iron. What you want is not a dark layer. The layer will darken with time and start looking like usual. But on a freshly seasoned metal utensil, the layer should be yellow-brownish. The stove ...


12

Not directly. Many spices gain, change or lose taste when heat-treated. You must know given spice and when to add it. Fresh dill or parsley leaves, after a hour of simmering are worthless, losing all aroma. Add at the very end of cooking. Black pepper changes its taste and loses spiciness under heat. You can add it twice, the pepper added early ...


12

Aliums (the garlic and onion family) can be a trigger of both allergies and food intolerance. Unfortunately, they're two of the most common flavorings in foods. There's already a question on here about removing aliums: Replacement for alliums? Tomatoes, are a separate problem, but it's not particularly prevalent in Asian cooking, other than on the Indian ...


11

Those are fried onions. They're pretty recognizable, but for confirmation I did a search by image and found this blog post in Finnish containing that exact image. The caption underneath the picture is: Kun riisi on kuohkeutettu, sipulit lisätään mukaan - n. kolmasosa jätetään koristeeksi. Google Translate translates that to "When the rice is loosened, ...


11

He brushes soy sauce on it, because he knows how much is sufficient to season each nigiri. Actually not just any soy sauce, but nikiri: A good sushi chef adds all the flavors the sushi needs before he hands it to the customer. He mixes his own sauce and uses it behind the sushi bar. This sauce is called nikiri. you can see him brushing it here: ...


10

You have four immediate options as I see it: Lightly season the chili, remove a portion for your child, then season the rest to your liking Lightly season the chili, then serve it with additional accompaniments to adjust it to your liking (eg, hot sauces) Season the chili to your liking, but serve it with something to help cut the flavor for the child (...


10

Adding flavors to the water will not transfer to the vegetables. Steam is a poor medium for flavor as water carries almost nothing with it when it becomes gas. There are a few very good methods to add some flavor to steamed veggies, so you can just use one of those! You can add herbs and other aromatics to the veggies This works best with fresh herbs, but a ...


10

If the label on your product lists the amount of sodium per some amount of your blend, then this answer should be useful to you. In the US that information is required on all manufactured food items sold. IF YOUR LABEL LISTS SODIUM There are three things you need to know to calculate substitutions involving salt. Edible salt is very close to 40% sodium by ...


10

The green tops of garlic are called 'garlic scapes' (or sometimes, just 'scapes'). They are edible (a kind of garlic/chive mix) and there are plenty of recipes available online that use them.


9

One reason I love to plant garlic (In October in the NE US), is that I can use it 3 times during its life-cycle. After planting garlic sprouts. These sprouts (what you might be calling a leaf) can be cut back to ground level before winter and used in cooking...garlicky chive-like flavor and application. Then in the spring, they sprout again. After a ...


9

MSG does have a taste on its own - umami. ElendilTheTall says in another question: As you are no doubt aware, there are 5 basic tastes - salty, sweet, sour, bitter and umami. Umami is the savoury flavour of mushrooms, cheese, cured meats, and so on. MSG is essentially 'pure' umami. In other words, MSG is to umami what salt is to salty and sugar is to ...


9

First of all, people indeed often add some seasoning in the beginning, but are usually careful with the amount, especially with salt. Flavor-wise, you could add it at the end, after the reduction and be fine. However, salt can also affect the process of cooking. For instance, it can draw moisture out of some vegetables when frying them first, meaning that ...


9

Interesting question. While I realize that dictionaries are descriptive, they're what we have to go by for common usage, so let's consult three: Wikipedia: A condiment is a spice, sauce, or preparation that is added to food to impart a particular flavor, to enhance its flavor,1 or in some cultures, to complement the dish. The term originally described ...


9

Foie Gras is fatty goose or duck liver. There is no machine or process to make it. It is harvested from the animals themselves. Restaurants have providers for their product. You will have to find one for yourself. I know of no legitimate substitute for Foie Gras that anyone would not care about. People pay a lot of money for Foie Gras and would be quite ...


8

Spices can sometimes taste different when their context(other spices and foods) or preparation is altered. Other than trying known recipes, I occasionally taste an unfamiliar spice in several states over a period of time: raw in cheek for a little while Infused (like tea). Try some plain, some with salt, and some with sugar, (an acid like lemon juice or ...


8

Here is a snarky but historically enlightening article on the combination from Slate magazine. 1) Salt enhances flavors that already exist in the food. Here is an article discussing the science behind the phenomenon from the ScienceFare site. 2) Pepper brightens flavor, and masks off-putting notes, such as staleness or blandness from overcooking. Black ...


8

Dry seasonings can be added either before or after cooking French Fries. However, for oven-baked potatoes, you want to avoid adding wet seasonings before cooking, as it may impair the crunchiness of the final product.


8

Since cooking the pasta in salted water is essential, and switching to fresh water or whatever is a PITA, I'd just use less water and thicken with something else. The standard ratio for salting pasta water is 1:10:100 - 1 litre of water for 10g salt and 100g pasta - perhaps you're over-salting the water?


8

If you want dry seasonings to stick to popcorn, you will probably need to add a liquid to adhere them with. You could try adding butter or oil to your popcorn while it is hot, then adding the salt and tossing it together. If you're avoiding extra fat, a few spritzes of a non-stick spray (like Pam) might do the trick without adding significant fat.


8

Use the fact that you have two hands*. If you don't want to pre-mix your spices, open all containers you intend to use. Assign one hand to be the "clean" one, one the "contaminated" hand. Use the clean hand to shake or pinch spices or salt from their jars (onto the other hand, the meat or your work surface, depending on your preferred method of seasoning). ...


8

Well, if you deep-fried something with a dry rub: all the oil-soluble flavors would dissolve into the fry oil. You lose your flavor, and also probably greatly shorten the life of the oil. (How long you can use it before it starts smoking and/or imparts a bad flavor). a lot of the rub would wind up falling off and making mess at the bottom of the pot/fryer. (...


7

By grinding it, you are also increasing the surface are of the herb when it reaches the tongue, and you are exposing the raw/inner (bitter) flavors of the herb to the mouth. When cooking with it "un-ground", the cooking process extracts just the oils from the herb, and leaves the leaf in tact which does not taste unpleasant to the senses. I would certainly ...


7

You can also marinate your vegetables before steaming or cooking. Try throwing them in a bag with some fresh herbs and some oil or butter several hours or the night before you plan on cooking them to infuse some flavors. You can also achieve similar results by steaming in a bag with those herbs and butter so that the food is in constant contact with the ...


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