54

It is mostly a fancy way of saying that they are combining flavors. There are no solid, physical layers involved anywhere. Still, there is a reason why the "layering" metaphor is more apt than simply saying "combining". Flavor is mostly about aroma, which leads to two aspects of "layering". First, aroma is not perceived all at ...


49

I think the description you're looking for is what is often described as "muddy flavors" or "fighting flavors" or "muddled flavors" (though the latter is also a term used for a specific technique, so searching the internet will give lots of results for that). This doesn't mean that it tastes like a mix of dirt & water--but ...


29

With your longer description, I can understand where you are coming from and why you don't like this version of the dishes (and also why somebody else might prefer them). But the term "bland" you chose is unfortunate, and is predestined to create misunderstandings. "Bland" is a word with a rather well-circumscribed meaning, and means that ...


11

If you could link the video with the quote in question that would be helpful. In the case of onion and garlic from your example, I would say "layering flavor" is just a way of saying "bring out the best flavor(s) from each ingredient by appropriately adding them in a certain order". Onions have quite a bit of moisture in them that needs ...


8

Okay, take a curry with 10 different spices (each of which you are familiar with) for example. Will you be able to identify each spice in the curry with just one spoonful? If there were only one spice, say pepper, it would be easy to identify. But with the 10-spiced curry, you will only be getting one tenth the amount of pepper, blended in with 9 times the ...


8

I like the comparison to 'the colour brown' & yes, I would agree this is quite possible. To try stick with this allusion let's consider a generic takeaway ['indian'] curry. A poor one is definitely 'brown'. I'm with you there. It has no highs & no lows, it's all just a generic 'curry flavour'. Contrastingly, a good one has depths & highlights. It ...


7

That recipe is very similar to Indian paneer. The downside of salting the whey is that most of the salt gets poured away, so you have to use lots (or soak in a small amount of whey. When making paneer, one good approach is to salt the curds after draining (though before pressing out the last of the whey). These acid-set cheeses tend to not keep very well, ...


6

Many people don't season their steaks before cooking and they still get tasty meat by seasoning it after. Salting beforehand helps release juices and gets a bit of flavor penetration, but it won't ruin it if you skip that step. Peppering before cooking is a bad idea anyway as the pepper will burn and turn bitter, so you should always pepper the steak ...


6

Garlic is an ingredient whose impact you can fine tune, depending on how you handle it. A clove used unpeeled, peeled and left whole, crushed, sliced, chopped, minced, or turned into a paste, all yield slightly different results, and depend on the impact you are looking for. So, yes, a whole, peeled clove, cooked in some olive oil, for example, does impart ...


5

It's really not about temperature at all. "While it's still hot" is a great description of when to do it, but it's not why. You want to salt fried food when it's straight from the oil, because the surface is still wet with oil. This ensures that the salt sticks to the surface of the food. As the food sits, the surface will dry (it cools off at the ...


4

You have some misconceptions here. First, coconut milk doesn't neutralize any acid, it is just fat in water, probably with a very mild acidic pH itself. For neutralizing an acid, you need a base (and it has nothing to do with the perception of diminished sourness coming from eating fat alongside the acid). Second, it wasn't the acid that stripped away the ...


3

Salt is just ....salt....no matter how it is labeled (assuming it is not a spice mix, with other ingredients). It might be more finely or coarsely ground, but....it's all the same. Just use less...a sprinkle on each side. You can always add more when you serve if you desire.


3

Your first picture might be the beginnings of a seasoning layer, though a bit lumpy & uneven from poor technique. "it was probably just burnt oil and nothing to worry about" - yeah… but that's what you actually want. That's the seasoning, or the very beginnings of it. In the later photos, I see no evidence of any seasoning remaining… nor, in ...


3

There's nothing really special about a bouquet garni. Don't let the French name make this seem more intimidating than it is. It is just a bunch of herbs. It has no special function other than making the herbs easier to remove than if they weren't bundled together. So then the meat of this question is really: can you substitute dried rosemary and dried ...


2

The more chopped-up you chop the garlic, the faster the garlic will return flavor when cooking it, but also the faster it loses its flavor. At my household, we don't really use garlic whole; we either chop them up into a mince, finely chopped or roughly chopped. We use minced garlic for raw consumption, in soy sauce based dips. We use finely chopped garlic ...


2

You will find that adding sugar to some recipes is controversial and highly subjective. Me, I almost never add sugar in situations like yours. But sugar can do something valuable: decrease bitterness. I knew an Italian woman many years ago that made the best "gravy" (tomato sauce) and her secret? A pinch or two of sugar, she claimed it made her ...


2

Brine first, marinate in oil after. Brining will firm up and you can decide when salty enough. EVOO with added herbs/chillies can better be used in recipes without tasting overly salty.


2

Adding sauces to the rice, in the cooker (regardless of method), will certainly impact the flavor of the rice. However, the fried rice of many (if not all) cultures, benefits from searing in a high-heat pan. Not only does this searing impact the flavor of the rice and other add-ins, but the sauces as well. So, flavoring the rice first might be delicious, ...


1

As @rumtscho has explained in his accepted answer, it's more a style of language than anything else. In your particular example, the reason why onions are added first, and then the garlic, is that onions can and should be heated much longer than garlic - garlic burns or turns bitter quickly; throwing them in at the same time would either undercook the onions,...


1

It's also about adding flavors at each stage of cooking. Each ingredient added should be seasoned, rather than dumping everything into the pan at once and adding seasoning. Example: Saute onions first, season with salt and pepper. Add diced carrots, celery, and peppers. Season. Before sauteing the protein, season well with salt and pepper and desired herbs. ...


1

Rice cooks well in a pressure cooker, in fact rather than using overnight rice I quite often follow an adaptation of this video (https://youtu.be/vvYUYiEW1Uw) for a very quick fried rice: Cook white basmati rice in pressure cooker for 3 minutes at the ratio of 2 cups of rice to 2 cups of water. Let the pressure release naturally, which takes around 5 ...


1

It's hard to tell with those lighting conditions, but no it does not look like rust. It looks like either another layer of (partial) seasoning or the bare steel that has been partially heat tempered: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/89/Tempering_standards_used_in_blacksmithing.JPG Rust is a dark burgundy color and red rust in particular will ...


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