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16

By using a dehuller machine. See: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hegzzj9Rzk or http://www.buhlergroup.com/global/en/products/dehuller-dgba.htm How does a dehuller work? I don't know, but it seems that Google does: The most popular decorticator for sunflower is proposed by the B├╝hler Cie. It consists in a rotating blade that propels the seeds by ...


14

Some pomegranate varieties produce pink or white seeds so yours sounds perfectly normal. I have had white seeds and they are as delicious as the red ones. Go for it.


14

Don't eat it as-is. It contains cyanide. Bitter almonds are the definitely poisonous thing you've probably heard of; they contain enough cyanide that just a few could kill a small child (according to On Food and Cooking). The poison is released when the kernels are broken, as defensive mechanism. The variety we eat is a "sweet" safe version which doesn't ...


13

Ground coriander is made from the seeds, so you definitely can substitute seeds. But you do need to grind them first. It's hard to get them ground very fine by hand, at least for quick cooking dishes, but if you toast then before grinding they're more brittle (so break up better). In a longer cooking dish the bits soften a little, so you can get away with ...


11

In Northern India, we eat Musk Melon and Water Melon seeds. In fact they are used like nuts. We make sweet dish too. The de-kernelling process is done by hand at home, which is quite lengthy. We deseed melon. Put the seeds to dry for approximatively 2 days; with fingers or tweezers, break the kernel and get the yummy seed. Of course, it can be stored for ...


11

Texture is the main reason, but if you're going to be blending the sauce, there can be off-flavors from cracking open the seeds. Even if you don't blend it, they can be these slippery little things that I never much liked growing up. To reduce the amount of waste, you can : cook the sauce, then put it through a food mill to strip out the seeds and skins, ...


10

Golden Flax Seeds Since you're only looking for a visual match, I suggest Golden Flax Seeds. The taste and texture, of course, are quite different, but they are still edible. Here is a side by side comparison. Sesame seeds Flax seeds


9

I could not find any credible sources indicating that flax seeds (also known as linseed) lose significant nutritional benefits after they've been smashed, crushed or ground. This article from Mayo Clinic in fact indicates that since the seeds tend to pass undigested, it is better to grind them: Most nutrition experts recommend ground flaxseed because ...


9

Any seed that has been damaged, cut, smashed, milled, or ground starts to lose flavour, texture, nutrition, and eventually will go rancid due to oxidising oils. Four hours is too short a time for anything noticeable to happen. Some types of nuts and seeds show a noticeable change over a day or two, but most take many days or weeks. Milled flax seed is ...


9

They're certainly edible, but you might have to work for it. A Western view from Purdue CropINDEX: Tamarind seeds have been used in a limited way as emergency food. They are roasted, soaked to remove the seedcoat, then boiled or fried, or ground to a flour or starch. Roasted seeds are ground and used as a substitute for, or adulterant of, coffee. People ...


9

Phew, too long for a comment. The liquid of (young?) coconuts is sterile and can even be used for transfusions. The abstract of the linked article doesn't say anything about the sterility of older coconuts. I assume that the older coconuts (esperically the peeled ones) are not sterile anymore. This not very trustworthy looking website (this article is ...


9

Caraway seeds in rye bread is - in some parts of the world - a tradition. Generally speaking, certain flavour profiles are traditional in different cuisines, not ubiquitous (see your baguette counter example), for many types of food. For rye bread, taking European areas into account where there is a "rye bread tradition", Northern Europe (Scandinavia, ...


8

I have been in the coconut export business for over 6 years. Coconuts are either 'young' 7-9 months or 'mature' 11-12 months old at the time of harvest. If you want sweet water, the coconut is harvest young, when the sugar content and volume of water are at their peak. As the coconut ages, the water is absorbed as the 'meat' in the coconut grows thicker. ...


7

Put the grapes on a plate - best if you do as many at one time as will fill the plate in one layer. Cover the plate with an identical plate turned upside down. Using a long knife cut between the plates to cut all the grapes in half at once. I use my thumb nail to scoop out the seeds, but the tip of a vegetable peeler will work better than a knife if your ...


7

If you have the right kind1 of peaches (freestone, ripe), cutting around the stone along the side seam and further on will be enough to let you separate the two halves and lift out the stone. In all other cases, this is where the fun begins. When working with peaches and nectarines, I always start with that initial once-around cut and try turning the halves....


6

I think the substitution should be straightforward. From the recipe, the dough should be able to handle that amount of seeds. My main concern would be with hydration level. Seeds can pull some moisture out of dough, which might make the bread a little dry or stiff. But the type of seeds you're talking about shouldn't absorb that much water, so it may not ...


5

I have had always success with sprouting fenugreek seeds that were bought as a spice. And an Indian friend of mine regularly grows fenugreek for leaves from the seeds bought for cooking. The seeds sold for cooking are whole (intact) seeds - they are quite hard and therefore difficult to break and damage. But I can not really say what percentage of the seeds ...


5

Here's a quick and easy way where you only your teeth and your nails. The tip of the sunflower seed shell has a little bit an edge, so I bite that off and then I crack open the cut that I made with my teeth with my nails.


5

Dry? If so, rolling down an inclined plane, such as a big handheld cutting board into a washing tub should work. The rounder seeds will roll, while the husks remain stuck. Pour in a thin steady stream. Broken seeds will likely still roll, as they've still got bounce to them, while the hulls do not. Wet? Stirred flotation is likely your best option. Hulls ...


5

We never peeled them growing up. We'd coat them in some oil, roast them in the oven (stirring occasionally), then season them when they came out.


4

When I was a kid we grew pumpkins for the pigs to eat during the winter. Most of the seeds were dried and sold, but we also ate some. This is how we shelled them: Clean and dry the seeds. (No need to wash, just separate seeds from pulp by hand). Hold the seed between fingers similar to a guitar pick (plectrum). Insert the seed between your front teeth and ...


4

I was told by a nutritionist to eat flax seed. If eaten whole, the seeds simply pass through the digestive system without contributing anything; they have to be ground in order to reveal their properties. As ground flax seed has anti-oxidative properties, it goes without saying that exposure to air reduces these properties thus the ground seed should be ...


4

This post is old, but surprised nobody has mentioned Kakai pumpkins. If you do gardening, just plant Kakai pumpkins. The seeds are grown without the shells. Can't get easier than already shelled.


4

My tree has always made very nice red seeds. But over the past couple of years they have been getting lighter. Now they are clear white or slightly pink. It has been very warm in the later months, and the leaves of the tree are staying on longer. I think the climate is the main factor. As with the person from AZ, they appear to get redder as the leaves ...


4

I have to soon partake in what is known as a "sweatshop" activity in my U.S. History class in a week. I went home and timed myself for 30 minutes to see how many i can do in that amount of time. I found if you pick out two of the most hardest shells you can place them between your thumb and middle finger and use them to pinch the other seeds. By doing this ...


4

Using a large amounts of seeds will significantly influence the humidity of your dough and bread. Dry seeds will soak up quite a bit of water - either during resting time or afterwards. This is especially bad when this soaking happens after baking, as your bread will get very dry... Wholemeal tends to have the same effect. The best way to counteract this ...


4

If the basil seeds are safe, the water should be also safe. If you have food-grade basil seeds (i.e. non-teated seeds) and didn't soak them for too long (so pathogens had enough time to grow), this should be safe. I think soaked basil seed last as long as soaked chia seeds, 2 weeks. There are even desserts / drinks with basil seeds and the water in which ...


4

Assuming food-safe seeds (are there basil seeds that aren't?), yes it is safe, both to drink the water and to eat the seeds. That's the point. Just now I have been experimenting with different ways to drink soaked Sacred Basil seeds. Other types of basil seeds seem to work just the same way, as evidenced by the results of an Amazon search for "basil seeds ...


4

I can't advise on any of these, so I'd normally put this in a comment, but it's a bit long. Searching on 'how to cook avocado seeds' found a few articles on the topic: http://www.livestrong.com/article/31737-eat-avocado-seeds-nutrition/ : calls for grinding it in a 'powerful food processor' and warns that it might damage lesser ones. http://www.wisegeek....


4

Persin is a fungicidal toxin present in the avocado which is generally harmless to humans. However when consumed by domestic animals in large quantities it is dangerous. It is an oil-soluble compound structurally similar to a fatty acid, and it leaches into the body of the fruit from the pits. Negative effects in humans seem to be primarily in allergic ...


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