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11

Seitan texture troubleshooting Spongy when simmered The classic Seitan problem- make a dough and boil it, anyone can do that right? Not with Seitan- either you get it just right or it's inedible. Here's two tricks. use a container The surefire way to avoid watery Seitan is to constrain it in some way- commonly used methods are aluminum foil, a freezable/...


10

The differences are as follows: Quinoa is a pseudocerial coming from goosefoot wikipedia. It is one of the trendy "superfoods" because it has a very high nutritional value ánd is gluten free. I have always used it as a grain substitute and do not know if it's any good as the main ingredient for a burger. Quorn is a meat substitute made of mycoprotein from ...


8

For what it's worth, I read once that you should briefly soak seitan in a bowl, covered in boiled water, to soften it up before using it. I have tried this, and it really does make a difference in the final texture. I typically cut it into cubes, soak it for about 10-15 minutes, then drain it and proceeded as normal for the recipe.


8

Cooks Illustrated has an ultimate veggie burger recipe that you can adapt. Their key to umami is cremini mushrooms. I've made that recipe and it was well received. Of course, no one mistook them for real hamburgers, but the patties tasted quite good. MSG (monosodium glutamate) is to umami flavour what sugar is to sweet flavour. So if you're pro-msg, you ...


7

Yes* *However, you may find the results from using seitan only disappointing. In my trials so far, I was able to build a fond with seitan. It tasted primarily of toasted bread, and burned easily. While my memories of other fond-forming foods (meat, alliums, mushrooms) are hazy, I am pretty sure that they produced more fond and had more complex flavors in ...


6

I think the mistake you are making is not letting the dough sit. Your recipe does not include a rest period for the dough, which is important. You want the seitan to absorb most of the water in the mixing stage, not in the cooking stage. Letting the dough sit before cooking is important for that to happen. Precooking seitan is important because you want it ...


5

Bury it in bread. A meat-substitute burger or kebab meat that has obvious textural or flavor flaws when served bare will often appear near perfect in a pita or bun. Also, you can keep a lot of oil/sauce on it that way, which carries seasonings and juicyness. Start with baked seitan, made from vital wheat gluten (and 10-20% of another protein flour like ...


5

I have never cooked with seitan, but found your question very interesting. The below excerpt from VeganFuel , includes a letter from the President and Founder of Fresh Tofu, Inc, a distributor of Ray's Seitan: We asked if their seitan is made in house, as it is consistently the best seitan we’ve had. We thought we may get some secrets for making our own ...


5

The texture and yield is governed two factors: developing the gluten completely and washing out the bran and starch effectively. To develop the gluten, combine the flour and water into a workable dough and give it 50 light strokes. Cover the bowl and let it rest 10-15 minutes. It is during this time that water chemically combines with the flour and the ...


4

While I agree with Mando Mando's answer, I would add a couple of thoughts. First, if you use shiitakes,use dried, they have much more umami (the name of that beefy taste) when used properly. You probably will need to mix a few ingredients. While umami taste is activated by glutamate (found in high levels in fresh shiitakes, soy sauce, tomatoes, kombu kelp, ...


4

I've done pretty much this - building a frond by browning seitan products, for the additional flavor it brings to the dish. As an aside, I don't actually know how it compares to traditional meat-based frond, I haven't tried that. But it is good enough for me, so that's something. I usually use aromatics in addition to the seitan products, and it does ...


3

Without knowing what specific recipe you're starting from, it's hard for me to say exactly. However, there are definitely recipes out there that call for olive oil as an ingredient in seitan (for example: Viva Vegan by Terry Hope Romero, pg. 35). You could try increasing that amount to see what happens, possibly decreasing the broth to keep the same amount ...


3

Fat is your flavour carrier. Seasonings should be well infused into your choice of fat/oil. Consider experimenting with dark sesame oil or walnut or pumpkin seed for part of the fat. I even add a drop or two of sichuan pepper oil to many 'meaty' dishes for added depth. One restaurant's terrific chili relied on old french-fry oil, though I don't recommend ...


3

Most recipes for seitan cook it too hot in the beginning (over-leavening it before it can set, getting it too light/"brains-ish") and too short (leaving the gluten rubbery). Try 140°C, 3 hours, wrapped in THICK tinfoil (several layers. Tightly or loosely makes a textural difference, because you are controlling how much it can expand). Also, brands of gluten ...


3

I have been experimenting with this very thing, which is how I stumbled on this conversation. Real meat (I'm not a vegetarian so I can easily compare) has a different mouth feel. Deli meat feels stretchy and fatty, which seitan never does. It's just stretchy. Adding oil to the mix just seems to make the seitan more brittle. My best luck so far is using the ...


2

I've been wondering this too. I wanted a texture more like sausage, with little pieces of fat. I've added finely-chopped onions that I'd caramelized in oil, and crushed up pieces of pine nuts. Both are delicious. The texture is still not exactly like sausage but it's closer, and the onions and pine nuts add extra flavor.


2

Here's a crazy idea. Freeze a few cubes of Earth Balance or other vegan butter, and blend the gluten flour and cold fat together in a food processor like you were making biscuits. You could also grate the frozen fat and mix it into the flour, being careful not to melt it with your hands. Steaming or simmering the seitan would likely cause most of the melted ...


2

Seitan that is boiled can get a kind of rubbery texture if it is cooked above a simmer, which your pressure cooker would definitely do. Seitan that is boiled also has a tendency to expand a lot, which can lead to sponginess. A few ways to combat this are to add a little bit of another type of flour to combat the rubbery texture. Just a few tablespoons of ...


2

In my experience a pressure cooker does not greatly influence the taste nor the texture of seitan. The same recipes apply for cooking in a regular soup pot and in a pressure cooker, but here are some suggestions that might help: Texture: The sponginess can be reduced by making a bit dryer (less hydrated) seitan dough and kneading it a little more, which ...


2

hmm.... my thoughts: 1) biologists use stock as a medium for growing bacteria. therefore, anything stored in stock; I generally like to boil/heat up a lot first before eating 2)the seitan should stay just fine; kept dry in the fridge in an airtight container 3) have you tried making steamed seitan, ala seitan of greatness from lachesis? 4) have you ...


2

Three things: Knead it very little Bake at a low temperature (325F for 90 minutes works for me) Add an ingredient that interferes with gluten formation (e.g. tomato paste) I follow this recipe, with a few modifications. I knead much less than recommended - just enough to bring the dough together, basically. The first time I made it I kneaded for a few ...


2

When preparing seitan I found out that the best way to "flavour" it is to prepare is on steam without previously removing starch (so no washing the starch out is needed). So it's steamed out in the process (usually around 40-50 minutes). To get THAT (I mean any type of meat prepared in special way) particular flavour I mix the dough with spices used in ...


2

Raw seitan can work in these kind of dishes, but it needs a different kind of temperature regime than "just boiling" it. You want to avoid heating it through above the boiling point of water before it is well set, otherwise you will get a lot of expansion and a brain-y/fluffy texture that is far from meaty. Also, raw seitan pieces tend to recombine (it is ...


1

I would first try this by cooking the seitan separately. I think that it needs time and heat for the protein chains to form and create that wonderful 'meaty' texture. Also because beef would have flavor of its own, I'd think your end product would be more flavorful if you cooked the seitan per it's directions and flavorings, and then added that to your stew ...


1

Some meat tenderizers will very likely work since they are proteases, some of which work on plant based proteins too. Try on a small piece and compare. Frying and simmering will both cook it to an even more firm state (maybe it would eventually cook to mush if you cooked it for days... but one way to MAKE it involves a 3-4 hour simmer :). I am assuming it ...


1

The easiest way to make perfect sausage-shaped seitan would be to buy vegan sausage casing(assuming you are vegetarian or vegan since you are making your own seitan). Something similar to this. Seitan in general isn't really smooth. And generally if it ever becomes smooth its probably over-mixed and becomes really tough. The casing provides a smooth ...


1

I've had success with this trick. Make a vegetable broth, season it as you would a soup stock. Use your fav recipe. Or simply use a vegetable boulion or broth. Cool it completely. When you make your seitan use the broth instead of water to mix with the wheat gluten or flour. This does help quite a bit.


1

I cook mine wrapped not too tightly in parchment and 2 layers on foil in a slow cooker on low for 4 hours. Comes out fine - solid, chewy but fine. Adding various other ingredients can alter the flavour immensely - tomato paste, garlic, onion, yeast extract, nori crumbled up etc Experiment 9 times out of 10 it's more than edible no matter what you try.


1

In case anyone's still interested, I make seitan at least once a week, usually more. It's extremely sturdy and storing it isn't nearly the headache the op seemed to think. As a matter of fact, cooked seitan "ages" very well, to the point where I won't serve it until it's been in the fridge for a few days. The texture and flavor generally improve during the ...


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