Hot answers tagged

11

For a fairly typical thread on this, see: http://www.thekitchn.com/cultural-differences-salad-bef-65008 The so-called reasons I see listed here are consistent with what I found in several different internet discussions of the issue, none of which are scientificially or academically credible: Restaurants serve salad first because it is easiest to get out ...


9

It's interesting that the two main choices you've asked about are before or after the main entrée course. In my experience in England and in continental Europe (Spain, Italy, France etc.) the salad is served as a side dish alongside the main or entrée course and is intended to be eaten alongside this course sometimes in place of some form of vegetable dish. ...


9

They just look like gimmick frying basket used for serving. When you fry things, you need to have "space" in the fryer to have a good consistent frying so that you have as much surface of the ingredients touch the hot oil as possible. If the ingredients get clustered together, they will stick and probably not cook evenly.


9

Servings/serving sizes are simply an amount that is "customarily consumed". There is no implication about what you should consume, about how much to eat per day, how often, or what part of the meal. It's just about what people tend to eat. The FDA has put a fair amount of effort into coming up with some sort of guidelines for all this. If you care to see ...


8

Seems like a good use for "family style". Bring platters or bowls of each dish to each table. Then at that table expect decent behaviour such as passing the platters around so everyone gets some. It shouldn't take long to fill and distribute bowls or plates of things. Carving meat into slices might take a while but would have to be done even if people were ...


8

Eat it faster. Seriously. I am a huge fan of homemade hot fudge and much of the appeal is the contrast between the cold and the hot. Freezing your ice cream more solid will help but insufficiently heating the chocolate won't. If the fudge gets too cool it sets up into one solid chewy chunk. Perhaps your best solution would be to serve smaller portions ...


8

I don't have any direct experience to share, but it seems a little logic may be applicable. I suggest that your hot fudge is too hot and your ice cream is not icy (cold) enough. Rather than microwaving the fudge, try a hot water bath on the stove. Yeah, it's slower, but you also won't burn the bejeezus out of the sugar at the edges. Taste occasionally while ...


7

It is completely a matter of aesthetics, other than the tendency of a metal plate to bring its contents to room temperature more quickly due to its higher thermal conductivity compared to ceramic.


6

Based on your picture, you're asking about Weiner Melange coffee in Vienna, a serving of half espresso coffee and half milk foam. That's instead of American "Viennese Coffee", made with whip cream and cinnamon. Assuming that's correct: The spoon is intended for mixing the milk foam and coffee. You may wish to add sugar as well. The sparkling water is a ...


5

Your question is actually a more general topic under food quality. The concept is either called stock rotation or just-in-time(for manufacturing). You simply need to anticipate the need for the item and prepare it ahead of time, multiple times throughout the day. If you need 10 portions an hour starting at 6pm, you need to begin marinating 10 portions at ...


5

The serving size is an arbitrary amount of the product, typically expressed in weight or volume. The servings per container number is simply calculated by dividing the net amount of product that particular container size holds, by the serving size amount. The manufacturers essentially pull the serving size out of thin air — it's a theoretically amount ...


5

I think isolating the fudge could be a good way to fix this. It might complicate your dish, but it might add both to the presentation as well as to the texture of the ice cream. Try getting hold of or make your own biscuit rolls (I don't know the name). Fill these up with hot fudge. The biscuit will act as isolation keep the texture of both the ice cream ...


5

The first step on the way to “pretty” scoops is the right texture of your material. As you noticed, with ice cream straight out of the freezer, the results are somewhat random, your technique probably involves a lot of hard work and you are basically “prying lose” your servings. If you’d ask your local ice cream shop about the temperature of their product, ...


4

Many consider salad a secondary food in the hierarchy. You can eat more meat if you skip the salad, or eat it last. If you eat salad first (without 100% fat drizzled salad dressing) you fill your stomach with fewer calories by volume. Your total caloric intake could possibly be reduced by eating salad first.


4

As Kate said, "family style" seems ideally suited to this situation. The problem with "family style", though, is that you need a lot of serving dishes. If you have 8-person tables (which tends to be the standard), for ~100 people you need at least 12 tables. Multiply by 4 dishes per meal, and you're at almost 50 serving dishes (and the same number of serving ...


3

Depending how many people you have over, and assuming the party is at your house, a lot of that is just fine at lukewarm rather than piping hot; you could stuff the pasta and chicken into an oven set to "Warm" or "200F" or whatever the lowest heat is, which keeps it dry and warm, and keep the desserts in the fridge, covered to prevent moisture. If you're ...


3

Standard answer is hotel pans and chaffing dishes with alcohol burners for the hot items. Double hotel pans with ice between them for the cold items. Coolers work well for storing items before serve. Things that are fried though would do much better in an oven set to the lowest temp, coolers will trap moisture and they will lose their crispness. Chafing ...


3

Most cakes should be served at room temperature, to maximize their flavor. This one does not sound like an exception. The ganache and buttercream should both hold well at room temperature on the day the cake is assembled (from its description, this is not a gateau that should be stored for a long time). Don't take the common restaurant practice of serving ...


3

You have this same problem with most fried foods that you want to serve fresh. Anyone who makes latkes for Hanukkah knows this problem well. So it's similar to this question What technique should I use to make latkes for a party so that I don't have to stay in the kitchen? You can try what I do for latkes - I put them on a drying rack, sheet pan, ...


3

There are a few questions about this topic already, but angel hair is very tricky as it's very easy to overcook ... but it also cooks quickly, so it might work. One of the big questions is going to be what other items you're going to be reheating, and so if all of the equipment that you mentioned are actually going to be available. You're going to be ...


2

When I was a teen in a rollerskating ice cream parlour, we had to get sundaes out quick with hot fudge. Most of the fudge was swirled around the glass container (somehow colder than porcelain) and only a bit on top before a blast of cream and a shower of nuts.


2

You set it arbitrarily, although hopefully based on some reasonable single portion size. Once you have the serving size, you calculate the nutritional information based upon it. There is some rumor of stronger regulation forthcoming in the US to make portion size claims on labels more realistic, but that is not the case at this time.


2

One potential difference may be the color of the plate. Food on a higher contrast plate (i.e., white vs. gray) will tend to look more appealing, and will also cause you to eat less due to the Delbouef illusion.


2

Don't use any food containing: alcohol acids (lemon juice, vinegar, ...) oils (butter, mayonnaise, cream, ...) So a salad without oil&vinegar should be safe for daily use, but ice cream, punch, pie (contains butter) etc are to be avoided. The health effects should be minimal, but you'll definitely ruin granny's beautiful set in the long run... ;-)


2

Draksia gave the best answer if you're going to be doing this a lot. If you're not, a few things that the average person is more likely to have, or can get relatively cheaply: To keep things cool: Find two vessels that nest inside of each other, with decent sides, fill the larger one with ice, then place the smaller one on top, with the food inside it. ...


2

You can line a typical pie pan with parchment paper. Cut a precise circle to cover the bottom, than a precise rectagle or trapezoid to fit the side. You can use a tiny bit of butter or shortening to stick the parchment paper to the pan and keep it in place. Once it is cooked, you can work a knife then a spatula or two under the paper and lift it all out in ...


1

two ideas come to mind. I dont know how many dishes get prepared, but if it's a limited selection, perhaps you can have someone prepare plates and people just have to come up and pick up a plate rather than standing there and picking up individual items. can you create a 2nd serving area? If you can have two tables where people help themselves instead of ...


1

I think this is normal. I have heard of other empirical observations, for example tough sous vide despite controlling the temperature tightly. The problem is that temperature scales assume that you stop heating the meat at this temperature. But what toughens the meat is not temperature, it is energy. Each joule you put into that meat is beating up a piece ...


1

I don't know if you're still watching this question, so I'll be brief. A Salad course after the main meal tends to only be during full course meals - I.e. four or more courses. It is meant to be a light green salad after a large roast dinner (usually) to cleanse the palate before dessert, which may include both a sweet dessert (cake, torte, etc) and cheese (...


1

A serious con of serving it separately is that if the food is spicy, or hot, you can't use the salad to wash off the excess of heat - you must depend on drinks (...and if the drink is hot too?) Other than that, you take the choice away from your guest: they may choose to eat the salad first or last, or mix it with the main course, or spread eating it evenly ...


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