67

The magnets themselves don't dull them; they're not nearly strong enough to deform a blade. But it is possible to damage your knives on those racks. It's very easy to drag the blade along the rack a bit as you pull it off, and easy for the magnet to snap it against the rack as you put it on. Both are avoidable, though. When removing the knife, you twist it ...


27

There is such a report, but you're not going to like the result. According to KnifeGrinder's scientific test(PDF), plastic board materials other than low-density polypropylene are the least edge-wearing board materials you can get. Wood wears the edge more than plastic, as a rule.


17

If it's a rod, it's for honing, not sharpening. As stated in this article from Serious Eats: One of the biggest misconceptions about the particular type of kitchen tool you see above is the belief that it's a knife sharpener. It doesn't help that many manufacturers sell their honing steels as such. But a honing steel is not a sharpener. Ridged, rod-like ...


9

With some experience you can tell by running a finger over the surface. As a general guide: grinding stones used for serious repair of knives form damage of long ngelect; will feel disticly rough, not as rough as sand paper but you can definitely feel an abrasive surface. sharpening stones : these will have a smooth surface but will have a definite 'drag'...


9

They can't really. The purpose of knives with microserration like in the one shown are as an alternative for people who are looking for knives that won't require upkeep. Knives with a much wider serration can be sharpened professionally but it can be tricky.


8

For a home cook: Honing should be done before or after heavy use or once every couple of weeks, depending on how finicky you are about the blade itself. Proper honing can stave off the need for an actual grind/sharpen for years. -Honing realigns the existing edge. Just a few strops on each side of the honing steel. It doesn't take much. -Sharpening grinds ...


8

Depends on the stone. If it's a countertop wetstone, then you want to angle the blade slightly, while you pull and slide outwards. You never want a purely straight pull. If it's a handheld micro-sharpener, then (while holding the blade at the sharpener designated angle) out and up, minding your fingers and wrist. If it's a sharpening steel, there's a ...


8

The tools you're looking for are: Money and a phonebook. Call a professional, and pay him to do the work. It's safe to say that after finding 9 posts covering how to sharpen knives, which all state more or less the same "..yes you can do it yourself, it's not too difficult, but it does require practice...", there is no magic tool. Yes you can do it ...


7

You will not be able to sharpen it with a steel as per Ching Chong's answer. You will be able to sharpen it with a couple of sharpening stones. If the blade is totally blunt you will need a reasonably coarse one to bring the edge back, and a finer one to refine the edge. Then you can strop it on the steel or the back of a leather belt to remove the burr. ...


7

There’s more to it than just grit size and there are complexities that won't show up in your marker test. What kind of material are they made from? Are they intended as water stones or oil? The waterstone is the hard mineral mixed with weak clay so it comes off and makes a slurry when you work it. On the opposite end are ceramic or metal stones that don’...


7

Grinding the blade down that much would potentially change the shape of the blade. Due to the full depth bolster you would have to either try to reshape the bolster as well or create a blade that tapered very differently. The knife is an Oxo Good Grips 8” chefs knife which sells for around £20. It’s difficult to see that either of your options would be as ...


7

Grit means very little for sharpness beyond ~2000. Far more important is a consistent angle. This is a good article that explains the angles a good sharpening tool will have a angle guide, something like this I'd recommend against "eyeballing" it the first few times. Joerg Sprave made a nice video explaining a lot, he uses the Gatco set I linked. And ...


6

Professional sharpeners here (The Netherlands) would charge around 50 cents per centimeter of knife or, more common, just 5-6 euro per knife, regardless of size. You paid around 10$ per knife (9 euro and a bit). The price of the knives alone (150$ for 14 knives 12 years ago, let's say 190$ corrected for inflation) doesn't sound like a price I expect to ...


6

How high a grit will yield an improvement, and what which brand and series(!) of stone will achieve, is somewhat dependent on the steel and heat treat used in the knife you are sharpening. A "very old" knife could be an obsolete stainless formula/heat treat yielding a very coarse (and/or unstable) grain- commodity stainless steels and their heat treating ...


6

All sharpeners remove steel. When sharpening a knife, you ideally want to remove as little steel as possible to get a very specific angle on the blade edge. If you were getting a blade sharpened professionally, they would typically go through different grits to get it smoother and smoother and eventually a polished edge. For a home pull through sharpener, ...


6

You are indeed supposed to remove so much material from the blade that the nicks disappear completely. You'll have to lose what's probably a least a milimeter of the blade's width. For that, the 1000er grit is indeed too fine. Go for something much coarser, and use finer grits for finishing. With the stone you're using, you'll have to spend days to get so ...


6

This is like saying "I bought my grandpa a Faber Castel pencil and 200 gm acid-free paper, and now the pencil is not drawing realistic portraits, why". Knife sharpening is a fine motor skill. The only way to learn it is through hours of deliberate practice. It is also a tricky skill to learn, because you don't really get immediate feedback per ...


6

It looks to me like a three--fold problem The angle is constantly changing. The action is bi-directional. You should only push. You need to push the knife at about 45° to the direction of travel so you offer up the entire blade in each sweep, rather than just one end of it at a time. oh, & a late 4… I don't think 1000 grit is going to be coarse ...


5

Very blunt knives need to be reworked by stone or sandpaper The edge on a very blunt blade will have folded over itself and lost a lot of its proper crystal structure. It's also likely to have lost a lot of its bevel geometry too, so the edge won't be "straight" longitudinally. Your best bet would be to invest, just one time, in sending it in for ...


5

How often you sharpen depends on how often you use them and the type of steel. I use Globals and Mundials and the Globals require much less sharpening Mundials. Here's a video from Chefs Armoury https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TPDgdo7jfM 1. Prep your stones Depending on what stones you use, you may need to soak or not. I use the Naniwa stones that just ...


5

There is some research going on on how to measure mechanical properties of steel using its magnetic properties. That might mean that if you change the magnetic properties of the steel (like hanging it on magnets), you could change the hardness of it - but I haven't found any article on it to support that. A problem which might occur later on is during ...


5

This looks like a pull through sharpener, using a combination of a carbide bit (left) and one type of ceramic wheel (right). The carbide section is best ignored unless there is a need to (badly) make a completely blunt knife usable, it will take off a lot of metal. Do not use on any valuable knife. The ceramic wheel section is to be filled with a bit of ...


5

As a quick clarification, honing is going edge first, stropping is going heel first. Honing will help to straighten the edge. Stropping will help to polish the edge (after honing). In every other video I've seen (and on the Wüsthof website) they say to hone the blade. Stropping is more of a finishing method, so I would say to hone the blade first, and, if ...


5

A decent micro-serrated knife stays reasonably sharp through heavy use. I have two (probably only Ikea own brand, or even supermarket own brand). They're not useful for everything, even brand new, but are generally handy (a little more detail in an old answer of mine). I've also had some even cheaper similar knives (with the intention of keeping them in ...


5

I know Wusthof know better, but I suspect that they suspect that consumers don't know better. Honing does make a blade "sharper", after all... if someone just knows that their knife is dull, they won't necessarily know that the thing they need is called a "honing steel", just that they want to make their knife sharper. Looking at Amazon search results, the ...


5

Several companies sell two-sided whetstones or waterstones are 1000/3000 grit or 1000/6000 grit (this King waterstone is the one I have), or similar medium/high grit combos. You want one of these two-siders; it's a nice compact way to get the sharpening you really need. These are what I recommend for a home use stone. However, if your grandparents aren't ...


5

Late edit: I eventually gave up with all this faffing & bought a good electric system - https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/108740/42066 For people who can't be bothered to sharpen their knives, getting anything that requires practise & skill seems rather pointless. Flat stones, honing steels and strops all require skill, otherwise the knife gets ...


4

The user "virtuovice" has some great videos on knife sharpening. It was my introduction to whetstone sharpening and since following his videos, I have been able to sharpen my range of kitchen knives to a pretty incredible sharpness. His videos are mainly aimed at hunting knives, but the techniques can be applied to kitchen knives Have a look at this video: ...


4

Sypderco ceramic sharpening rods; that is the easiest for me. Very easy to do, holding the rod like a carrot to be peeled, then run the peeler down the edge of the rod. To see how to do it at the end of their three-part training video (their site or youtube). You can buy their sharpening system, or just buy the replacement rods (other companies sell them too)...


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