35

Although it doesn't explicitly say so, that's allergy information. It's just been processed in a place that also (potentially) processes those things, so it potentially contains a trace amount, which could be bad if you have a really sensitive allergy. It won't contain enough of those things to matter for any other purpose. Often labels like that are ...


22

There are a few things that you can do: Buy in bulk. There's typically a major discount for buying a 'family pack' (usually 5+ lbs) at once. I like shopping at Wegman's, because they sell steaks that are on sheets where each one's individually wrapped, so I can leave some sealed for later in the week or even freeze them. Shop at more than one store. ...


17

The first step is to only pick up items you're likely to buy. Then you should only have to put down items that have an actual problem already. For some things you want to check for ripeness, but under-ripe items are more robust, so it should be possible to pick them up gently without damage and put them down again. After all, it's handled by people and ...


16

Depending on where you live, there is a pretty simple approach you can try. In the next few days, head out to places that specialize in particular kinds of foods and in making them appeal to you. A farmer's market, a butcher's, a cheese shop, a bakery, etc. Chat with the staff and buy whatever speaks to you in the store. When you come home, make whatever ...


16

Heavier limes tend to be more juicy, but another important factor is the color and texture of the skin. Look for the brightest green (sometimes with almost a yellow tinge) and smoothest skin you can find. Many bumps or shriveled looking areas are good indications that there will be less juice. If that's all that's available in your store, though, just get ...


16

Since you mention Whole Foods, I'm assuming you're in the US. That being the case, you are likely within reasonable driving distance of a Costco or Sam's Club (big warehouse stores that require memberships). At these stores and many other outlets, you can buy what are known as "primal cuts" in choice and even prime grades. Primal cuts are big anatomical ...


12

One of the things that we forget in the U.S. is that foods are seasonal -- if we didn't have food flown in from the southern hemisphere, we wouldn't have berries and most other fruits available year round. Learning to cook based on what's available isn't something that's typically taught, but I'd recommend the following: Learn different techniques, and ...


12

Sushi does not require fish, sushi is the style of rice preparation (rice, salt, a little rice vinegar, occasionally some kombu). So long as you have the correct preparation of rice, you technically have some form of sushi (you could just throw it in a bowl with some additions on top and have a type of sushi called chirashizushi). Second, there is no such ...


11

Most seafood counters will sell you small vacuum sealed portions of frozen fish. The fish is often frozen on the ship where it is caught and so will be fresher than even if you bought it at the dock. The freezing will also kill any parasites and is the only prerequisite for the label "sushi grade". See this question: What exactly is "Sushi Grade" ...


11

As far as I am aware, you cannot recognize this in advance. What you describe is due to very damaged cell structure in the fish. The "water" are the fluids contained in and around the fish cells, which make the filets juicy. They flow out when the cell walls in the fish rupture. The reason for rupturing is that the fluids are water-based, and water ...


11

The spots aren't anything to worry about. From Egg Safety Center Eggs with blood spots and meat spots are fine to eat. Most eggs with blood or meat spots are detected by electronic spotters and never reach the market, but it’s impossible to catch them all. Blood or meat spots are caused by the rupture of a blood vessel on the yolk surface when it’s ...


10

According to Wikipedia: Scallions (also known as green onions, spring onions, salad onions, green shallots, onion sticks, or syboes), are the edible plants of various Allium species, all of which are "onion-like", having hollow green leaves and lacking a fully developed root bulb. In the grocery stores I've been to most (east cost of US), if they ...


9

This might not be an option for you, but if it is then it could be brilliant for you: Join a local farmer's co-op... We have one close to us: http://www.localharvest.org/black-hog-farm-M41490 The genius of Black Hog is that they drop the freshest ingredients of the season on your door and then you get to just be creative with them!


8

Regarding the last question: Do egg producers and/or chefs use dirty tricks to effect a yellow yolk? Dye? Food additives? Yes, they do! In fact scientists have experimented with food additives in order to control the color of the yolk. Interestingly enough the preferred color of the egg yolk differ between countries and even between regions within ...


8

The color of the yolk is based on the chicken's diet. I eat vegetarian fed eggs from the grocery store and they have deep yellow yolks. If I go back to buying standard white eggs its a bit disconcerting because they have very pale yolks. In the fall is when the eggs are the orangest for pasture raised eggs, again something about what is available to feed. ...


8

"Ramen noodles" are a predominantly North American term for what the Japanese call "Chinese Noodles" (Chukamen, which I've also seen spelled Yuukamen). In practice, you can use any wheat noodle that's made with eggs or kansui, including lamian or mee pok, or even buckwheat noodles (notably soba). Noodles made without either of those are not recommended. It ...


8

There are a few consideratons that I can think of: How durable the device is. Generally, this is going to mean that you want something metal & heavy, but I'd really look at reviews of any model that you plan to buy online, particularly from something like Amazon which lets you see those 1 star ratings, and you can see why people rated them so poorly. ...


8

Yes it is still good. A lettuce that is kept outside (as in a farmer's market) will get wilted outer leaves, and the merchant will usually cut them off to make the heads nicer. Depending on the resulting size; if they cut out too much compared to other lettuces, I might ask for a lower price if sold by the unit. Personally, I will buy the lettuce with as ...


8

The juiciest limes will generally be the heaviest ones. Water is dense, citrus peel and dry citrus are not so much.


8

The most tell-tale factor I have found -- and this applies to lemons and oranges too -- is the thickness of the pith. When there's a half inch of that bitter white stuff, the pulp which contains all the juice is necessarily reduced in size. This seems to vary seasonally. It is most easily tested by rolling the fruit on a table under your palm, with gentle ...


8

This is not a traditional Bulgarian product (*). It was created by one specific dairy company ("Jossy") and it is not even listed on their normal web page (http://www.josi.bg). There is one reference to it on their Facebook page (https://bg-bg.facebook.com/JOSIltd/photos/a.153616871328971.29781.150703611620297/926675350689782/) where they ask users to ...


7

The canonical bread flour is France's Type 55, which should be roughly equivalent to German type 550. Both are defined by ash content, with the German measures being 10x the French ones. Now, the King Arthur Flour website lists 11.5% protein content for their equivalent of French Type 55 flour. So, I'm thinking you want a higher-gluten German type 550... ...


7

The UK has the right bread making flour in its supermarkets. I'd think that the UK has the closest to American style breads. Though it is outside of the Schengen zone, they do speak English and should be able to send you some. Try some companies such as Graig Farm, Wessex Mill, FWP Matthews or Flourbin. These websites probably won't list delivery to Germany ...


7

One element of the question that hasn't yet been answered: "Is it really necessary to stock 3 types of flour in my pantry...?" Probably not. At least two are good, but it will cost you more than just buying AP. You can actually blend your own all-purpose flour by mixing a soft flour (like cake or pastry flour) and a hard flour (like bread or "high-gluten" ...


7

1) Because the meat is ostensibly higher quality and 2) because of the relatively high cost of refrigerated shipping. Your local butcher is probably a better option for bulk buying. Tell him you plan on regularly buying a large amount of beef and he should be willing to cut you a deal. If not try another butcher!


7

I usually only "plan" for big parties, and even that planning is driven mostly by knowing what will be in season when I go shopping. For the average weeknight meal, I don't make shopping lists except to the extent that I know I'm missing something I want to have that evening. If you're an urban dweller, and a passable cook, you don't need to plan so much as ...


6

The price of genuine-sealed-and-certified parmagiano reggiano is quite high and fairly consistent, especially for more aged varieties. I think your best bet to save money will be to use a similar parmagiano reggiano cousin, such as grana padano, romano, or a quality Argentinian reggianito. As a second-tier approach, you might look at domestic Parmesan, but ...


6

Generally..no. There's a very, very minimal advantage...if any. They chop certain things 'ok', but many things require a knife anyway. Most large objects will have to be cut anyways to fit in which means you'll need a knife and a cutting board just to use the chopper. Their blades tend to dull and then they mash, rather than chop. It takes about 10 ...


6

Can't speak for Atlanta, but up here (Canada) when I am looking for a meat that a supermarket doesn't carry (like goose), I go to the local butcher. My butcher brings in a very good selection, and otherwise usually knows of more sources. Also good places to check are local farmer's markets. Edit: Adding to an old answer as I've come across another ...


6

My advice is simple -- don't plan ahead. Being fresh produce, most of us have no idea before you get to the store what the current stuff coming out of the local fields are. This is going to affect both price (in season stuff that hasn't been shipped from the opposite hemisphere is typically cheaper, especially w/ today's fuel prices), and quality (how long ...


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