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69

Biologically speaking, they are actually different species, but the names are so commonly used interchangeably as to completely muddle the distinctions. For example, spot prawns are actually shrimp while ridgeback shrimp are actually prawns. Prawns have claws on three of their five pairs of legs, shrimp have claws on two of their five pairs of legs. Their ...


49

Crustaceans like shrimp, lobsters, crabs and crayfish have a pigment called astaxanthin in their shells. Astaxanthin belongs to the terpines class of chemicals of which the carotenoid ¹ class is a subdivision and, in a marine environment, gets produced by an algae that is subsequently consumed by crustaceans (and other animals like salmon, red trout, red ...


25

This depends partially on the cooking technique and the shrimp variety/size (=> thickness of the shell). If the shrimp is deep fried the shell can turn crispy and is super fun to eat. However, if boiled, the shells are chewy and extremely unpleasant - in this case you have to peel them. I am not familiar with the spicy garlic shrimp, but you can just try ...


14

Three possibilities that I can think of: If the water weren't cool enough and they were big shrimp, it could raise them to a temperature at which bacteria could develop. If the water were actually warm or hot, it could start to cook the shrimp. If the shrimp were defrosted directly under water, not in a bag, they could absorb some of the water and the ...


12

That's not really true in any meaningful way, and has nothing to do with sushi. It sounds like the author was just trying to make it sound scandalous to attract attention. It's a really, really sensationalized version of something true about at least some species of shrimp. They're essentially all born male, so before they can reproduce, naturally, some of ...


12

From your photos, the "disgusting grey" shrimp are raw and should be cooked before using in shrimp cocktail. I assume that the shrimp you used to buy were pre-cooked, peeled, tail-on.


11

The shells are edible (no harm would come to you) but unpleasant. You're supposed to remove the shell and eat the shrimp. If no no one is looking I'll suck on the shells because they do have nice flavor. If you can save a decent sized pile of them, you can make a pretty serviceable broth by boiling them for a couple of minutes, but that is usually done with ...


11

The shells do have strong shrimp flavor that can contribute to a sauce, and are also left on for visual reasons. But personally, the choice of whether to leave it on depends on how I'm planning on eating the shrimp. If they are going to be picked up and eaten, it is nice to have a little "handle" to grab them by. If they are part of a curry or heavily ...


10

I'm Chinese American and when I order garlic shrimp I prefer to eat the little feet beneath the abdomen because it's slightly crunchy and thoroughly marinated in sauce. But I always peel off the rest of the shell since it's hard to chew and usually tough. A couple of years ago I went to an Indonesian restaurant in New York City and tried a dish where the ...


9

Foaming is the result of proteins. For example, urine (sorry) foams when protein levels are high (persons with kidney failure can judge their urinary protein levels by how much foaming occurs). Vegetables have no protein; shrimp juices, plenty. Fats counteract protein foam formation, so egg whites ( very high protein) foam nicely, but not if any yolk or ...


8

This is how shrimp is frozen for transit and sale. The packaging should have a weight that includes the ice aswell as the shrimp, and a weight that is shrimp only weight: The weight after they have completely thawed. There will also be a size grading. No of shrimp per lb or per KG based on whether they are HOSO Head On Shell On HLSO Headless Shell On or ...


8

Update Jeff Axelrod commented (much thanks) that the Costco IQF shrimp come with most of the shell removed. In that case, "DO NOT FORCE THAW UNDER RUNNING WATER" most likely means if you do it, you'll end up with "shrimp pulp" with some of it even down the drain. The shrimp can absorb the water and get mushy and disintegrate. This, I have seen in our ...


8

This is most probably due to the occurrence of a specific carotenoid (Astaxanthin) in their body. This carotenoid (like many others) is susceptible to enzymatic or nonenzymatic oxidation, which depends on the carotenoid structure, the oxygen availability, enzymes, metals, prooxidants and antioxidants, high temperature, and light exposure Sources: ...


7

Wilting in greens is triggered by temperature, pH, and salt content. To reduce wilting, you can cool the vegetables or shrimp, make the vegetables more acidic*, or decrease their salt content. My suggestion would be to cool the shrimp with an ice water bath or cold running water. This is the most traditional approach for shrimp salad. Alternately, you ...


7

Because you want to cook (reduce) the wine down (or any other liquid). Also, adding butter, usually cold butter chunks in the pan at the end will help emulsify the sauce. in the grand scheme of things it is not a big problem if you add wine after the butter, but the result will be different, the wine will taste more raw, the sauce will not be as smooth. I ...


6

As far as I know, shrimp paste is ground shrimp fermented with a lot of salt. You may have a hard time replicating this exactly with easy-to-find vegan ingredients, but I think what might work well as a substitute is a mixture of miso and dried seawead or kelp powder. The seaweed would give you the fishy taste and the miso - which is salted, fermented ...


5

The frozen pre-cooked shrimp are of course safe to eat if they come from a reputable source. You may wish to cook them a little bit to heat them up to service temperature, and integrate them with a sauce or spices or so on, but you could just peel and eat them if you wanted to. The shrimping industry may have some variation in how it processes shrimp after ...


5

When adding wine for such a sauce, you want to reduce it down quite a bit (not to complete drynesss, though). The butter is there to give the sauce body by thickening it. But as there's not much that acts as an emulsifier1 except the butter proteins, you don't want to heat it more than strictly necessary once you add the butter: excessive heat would denature ...


4

This is OK to eat. Ice buildup on frozen food happens through a normal process. It is not a sign of bad handling. The food has probably spent longish time in cold storage, but out is still safe. The taste should also be ok or only minimally changed, but certainly worth eating.


4

The biggest loser when IQF shrimp are "force defrosted" is diminished flavor profile and loss of texture (or mouth feel - they should have a certain resistance to the bite). There is no danger of any food safety issues when force thawed. The very best way to thaw any IQF shrimp of any size and style is to leave them in the bag, put the bag in a bowl, and ...


4

If it's safe to eat the shrimp, it should be safe to eat the head. The US food authorities (FDA) have, in a way, approved of the shrimp you have bought, so it's safe to eat.


4

My wife is from China (Northeast) and she ALWAYS eats the shrimp (fried) with the shells intact. (chopsticks, fork, hands, whatever) I do too now, and prefer it that way.


4

I believe the answer to the question lies in the last paragraph of your question. If you had close to 4 cups of broth, 1 1/2 cups of half-and-half, plus onion purée (which would be mostly water); you're pushing 6 cups of liquid, not including any wine or brandy that you may have used. For that much liquid you would need close to a quarter of a cup of flour, ...


4

If you look at the label, you see "CKD SHRIMP..." which I read as "cooked shrimp". Even without the label, you have two indicators for cooked: the colour: raw shrimp are greyish-green, they turn pink when cooked the body shape: raw shrimp have a more "stretched" body, they curl up during cooking.


4

This is most likely caused by the sugar in the brine you used. There must have some sugar left on the shrimp (especially between the shrimp and the shell), even if just a bit. When you grilled your shrimp, the high temperature of your barbecue caused the sugar to get caramelized and delicious, but also very sticky. It more or less "glued" the shells to the ...


4

For safety reasons, it's strongly discouraged to re-freeze thawed products without cooking them first, as you don't know how long they have been waiting to be sold. Repeated freezing won't do anything nice to the texture, either. But as you want to get a decent amount, can't you discuss with the grocer to buy them still frozen? If you then transport them in ...


4

I agree with @Joe. It sounds like you are heating too much and overcooking the shrimp. Once things like shrimp are overcooked I am not sure that there is a way to make them tender other than to cook for a long time, similar to slow cooking. With squid the rule for cooking is less than 2 min or more than 20 min to ensure tenderness. I think your best bet is ...


4

As it seems my comment was deleted ... To figure out if it's an issue with overheating: Remove the shrimp from the dish (these are U20, so they're decent sized), and heat up the rest of it, then add the shrimp back up and let them warm up from the rest of the sauce. If that's still okay, the problem is with overheating the shrimp. ... but I don't know a ...


3

This is what I came across. These two differ in their: Physical structure: Prawn has three pairs of legs while shrimp has only two (easy way to differentiate) As far as nutrition goes, they are almost the same with prawn having 20g of proteins & shrimp having 24g of proteins. As far as taste goes shrimp tastes buttery while prawn tastes a bit like ...


3

You're supposed to eat the shrimp with chopsticks, picking one up from the platter, bite off a piece if they're large, chewing up the whole thing, and swallowing only the meat and spitting out the shells as politely as you can on the table. I'm going to guess that if you are served shrimp prepared in this way, the shrimp are probably large. The purpose of ...


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