Hot answers tagged

4

Dish soap will not damage silverware. To remove tarnish you can get special silverware cleaning solutions like tarn-x. Note that the tarnish itself is a form if damage caused by the oxidized metal, so by removing it you are essentially scraping of a tiny layer of silver every time. Edit - A good tip I forgot to mention: tarnish is self-limiting (meaning ...


3

If you are considering heating any food in it, I would say no. Silver itself is not especially pleasant (wikipedia and a more detailed CDC study). So, if you have a dish that is losing its silver plating, it would be wise to be overly cautious than casual about using it for food again. Is the base copper or brass? There is copper in brass anyway. Copper ...


2

Use a catalyst cleaning method; dunk your silverware into hot water with aluminium and soda http://www.darylscience.com/Demos/Silver.html http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsKLcc13WBo No silver lost this way!


2

Silver sulfide, AKA tarnish, has a solubility of 0.14 mg/L (0.14 ppm), and takes a long time to dissolve. EPA action levels are much higher: The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recommends that the concentration of silver in public drinking water supplies not exceed one milligram per liter of water — one part per million — because of the skin ...


2

Aluminium is just a catalyst (is not consumed) in this reaction Silver sulfides are in theory reformed back into silver, so none should be lost. In practice the sulfides will have moved the silver away from the main surface with pitting etc, so some silver will be lost, but there is no product that can put the silver back in place anyway A large surface ...


1

Electrochemical de-tarnishing removes very little silver compared to mechanical methods. However, you may get uneven cleaning and color changes from the way the silver recrystallizes.


1

Silver tarnish occurs because of exposure of the silver to trace amounts of sulfur in the environment, mainly in the form of hydrogen sulfide gas, but also from rubber. The best way to prevent silverware tarnish is to store the silverware in a container which (a) limits their exposure to air, and (b) retards tarnish. The simplest of these is sliver cloth, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible