Hot answers tagged

13

It sounds like maybe there's a couple of possibilities. The pan is too hot. This can happen even over lower heat settings if you leave the pan to preheat for too long, or it may be that the burner's "medium-low" setting is just too hot, and you should use an even lower setting. The batter consistency is wrong. Crepe batter should be very thin, if it is ...


11

There are a couple of reasons, traditional and some functional: The home cultures where these recipes are indigenous use a wok, so many recipe authors go the same way Woks are usually made out of carbon steel, and are poor conductors of heat. This means that the strongest heat from the concentrated heat source is in the center/bottom of the wok. As you go ...


11

In this case, you are braising the apples. The water is the braising liquid, which helps to cook the apples, reduces, integrates with the other ingredients, and becomes a sauce. It also keeps the apples from sticking to the pan and burning.


9

Just because peanut oil has a higher smoke point than other oils doesn't mean your pan won't get hotter. Don't leave your pan on high for so long.


9

Pans should be completely flat, and producers are usually very good at getting it right. Even very cheaply made pans are usually sold properly flat. What you describe sounds like you warped your pan. When you heat a pan on a burner that is too small, it becomes convex when viewed from above, if you heat it on a burner that is too large, it becomes concave. ...


8

You can actually buy tools which help to spread batter. My sister got me a hot-plate crepe maker for Christmas the other year, which came with one of these: Which I find does the job perfectly! You should be able to find one online pretty easily or DIY one yourself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uhKFAlk-gtU


7

How to remove old seasoning and start over from scratch? Very few cases actually require a full stripping of cast iron and restarting your seasoning from scratch. If you ruined your seasoning somehow, it can usually just be fixed by scrubbing and baking on a fresh layer of oil or two. However here are a few real reasons: 1) The pan is new, and you don't ...


7

Great question - very well put! Your chef advice is sound. I have been cooking with cast iron skillets for longer than I care to admit (old guy) and at first they can be intimidating but in the end, they become your go to pan especially for searing/cooking hot. You asked the same question several times, "is the residue safe?" It's as safe as the cooking ...


7

Summary: Loosely, so the food doesn't steam. Heat distribution As your question implies, the heat distribution through a quality pan is not perfectly even. It will be hottest directly over the hot spots of the flame or element. Still, if your pan is well matched in size to the burner or heating element, and is of reasonable quality, that effect will be ...


7

First, this can indeed be a thick batter, as the other answers mentioned. I would recommend using Ruhlman's ratio of 1:2:2 flour to milk to egg as a starting point of what a good crepe batter should be like. You can experiment with other recipes if you want something nonstandard, but first do some batches to get a feel for the proper consistency. And don't ...


6

It is a stove top griddle. You set it across two burners (hobs for Brits), and heat it up. You can use it for any griddled foods: pancakes, hash browns, grilled sandwiches, hamburgers, steak, and so on. The little track around the edge is to capture any juice or fat that run off the surface without making a mess. You season it like any other cast iron ...


6

Here's the deal ... if your pan is seasoned correctly using an oil with a high iodine value, then no, soap won't harm it. If it's not seasoned correctly, then it could need a strip & reseason. If you're using a low iodine oil (the surface will be slightly tacky when the pan is cool), then it also might ablate the surface somewhat, and repeated ...


6

Yes, you can use a normal frying pan to make pancakes, assuming you have a stove. I am chiefly familiar with the definition of skillet that is equivalent to frying pan, but I see that there is a British definition that is a pot with feet for cooking on a hearth.


6

I have seen this kind of skillets in packets with ingredients. Both for brownies and for mini pizza's. Mix the ingredients as per the instructions, put in the little skillet and put in the oven. It might be a bit big for the 'cook on the table' sets, but it might fit for that. You can use them for whatever is small enough to fit in and on each kind of heat ...


5

Technically, yes, though the crust will likely be less brown and evenly brown than if you use a cast iron skillet, especially if the sides of your regular skillet are thinner than the base. If that is the case, the sides will be less brown than the base of the pie. You might also have to adjust the cooking time on the recipe as well, so if you're a ...


5

Chicken breasts do not require extremely high heat, nor strong searing (in fact, they are quite easy to overcook), so while a cast iron pan is certainly effective, it is not required. Any quality pan will do. If you are sauteing simple chicken breasts (perhaps lightly marinated or seasoned), the technique is quite simple. Often, you are better off pan-...


5

Not likely that pan itself was hot enough to ignite. The auto-ignition point for cooking oils is 400 to 435°C (750 to 815°F). You must have splashed some oil and it contacted an ignition source (e.g. flame). One option would be to kill all flames before adding any oil. Note that on an electric stove, it'll take some time for it to cool down, so you'd have ...


4

Personally, I would not put it in the oven. You may be able to get away with it if you are not broiling anything for an extended period of time, but heat does not play nice with wood and after extended use I would expect the wood on the handle to blacken or even crack.


4

If you are paranoid about under-cooking meat, then use a digital probe thermometer and cook it to its safe temperature. No amount of timings or looking at the colour will give you the same level of certainty. They are available online for very little and are extremely handy; not only will you not under-cook your meat, but you will also avoid over-cooking it ...


4

Many stainless steels are ferric, so will work with induction cooktops. Aluminum cannot interact with magnetism, so cannot work on induction, so many companies offer stainless steel non-stick pans for the induction market. You won't see much difference in performance, and since it's not what you want in the first place I'd send it back unused.


4

I give you my opinion Cast iron pans give you exceptional results when you have to cook, because they are facilitating a chemical reaction with the sugar contained naturally in food. However, I find them heavy and for my way of cooking I prefer an iron frying pan (de buyer does fantastic pans. I suggest carbone plus). I have three of them, one for fish, ...


4

Summary: The cure to hard or overly chewy fat is generally longer cooking, but you may also want to consider trying a different source for procuring steaks. My guess, based on the description in the question, is that this is a collagen issue. Beef fat will begin to melt over around 100F (~40C), and it will begin rendering in earnest by the time you hit the ...


4

I've had success in restoring bald spots in my cast iron skillet. After cooking and cleaning, I add oil when the skillet is warm. Eventually the "bald" spot fills in. Mine took about 3 months of 1-2 weekly uses.


4

Every year these skillets come with the individual chocolate chip cookie mixes (and individual brownie, cake, etc) that you can get in the gift aisle at Christmas. They're usually considered food gifts. If you go to Amazon and put in the phrase "skillet cookie kit" you can see a wide range of them.


3

When I have a fry pan with "other" material handle and want to put it in the oven I wrap it in 3-4 layers of tin foil first and no problem. Usually the oven isn't any higher than 375 degrees Fahrenheit. Hope this is helpful.


3

Once you become accustomed to cast iron, you will find it to be far superior to other cookware for frying, sautéing, roasting and baking. Cast iron is also wonderful for reheating leftovers in a hot oven — it almost makes them taste freshly cooked again. Some people avoid cooking acidic foods in cast iron, for fear it will affect the seasoned surface, but I'...


3

As an addition to the above excellent advice, if you cooked something that didn't get the pan overly dirty, try putting a few teaspoons of non iodized salt in and cleaning with that. Has the effect of sand, and effectively pulls away excess oil. For very dirty cast iron. I agree with the above answer!


3

Depending on what kind of stock pot or soup pot you intend to use, you can just brown the bones right in the bottom of the pot. I don't think my mom ever put bones in the oven to make soup. Put a little oil in the bottom of the pot and brown the bones like you would sautee meat over medium high heat. When you've got the desired browning done, just pour in ...


3

But there is some stains left... do I need to clean this or is this normal and leave it ? As long as the "stain" is hard and dry rather than gummy or sticky, it's probably fine. As commenters have noted, it looks like polymerized oil. You probably cooked your steak at very high heat with some oil in the pan. If you didn't use oil, the stain might just be ...


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