31

If by “noodles“ you mean pasta that comes in the dry form with or without eggs, then yes, you can make that in the slow cooker. There is one caveat though: other than your meat, which won’t be affected by a bit of extra cooking time, pasta tends to become soggy rather quickly - or, at least “quickly“ in slow cooker time. After 30 minutes, plus minus a bit, ...


21

Short answer: if it doesn't get heated to the caramelization temperature then it does not caramelize. The science is here, and it says you need at least 110 °C for fructose. Browning in your case is probably not caramelization, but a Maillard reaction, which is a chemical reaction between an amino acid and a reducing sugar, usually requiring the ...


19

It shouldn't be a problem. I would probably use a lower cooking temperature however. Start with a highish temperature of about 180-200C, to bring the meat out of the danger zone quickly, then lower it to 80-90 for a long slow cook. You will probably want to introduce some liquid to the pan to avoid it all drying out.


19

Browning your beef with some flour adds depth of flavor. The flour will act as a thickener, and by coating the meat with it you won't have problems with it clumping and getting little flour balls in your stew. However, unless you are browning the meat before adding to the cooker I would recommend you leave it out as uncooked flour might give your end dish a ...


18

It will be safe and edible. It might not be quite as good. Part of the appeal of slow cookers is just the convenience of leaving them unattended. The other appeal is low-slow cooking that blends flavors and melts connective tissue without burning anything. Meat Cooking things faster and hotter will not make the meat as tender as it would be- but it will ...


17

It's safe. All that matters for safety is that the food stays out of the danger zone (above 140F). But it sounds like a pretty reliable way to overcook things. Perhaps that's why it sounds absurd to you? Slow cookers tend to be somewhere between simmer and light boil (probably at least 180F), and there's very little that won't be fully cooked after half a ...


16

Another way to say this is to quarter the cabbage. The goal is to make "wedges" (triangles, when viewed from above) that are smaller than an entire head of cabbage (easier to cook and fit in your slow cooker) but still relatively intact. To wedge a cabbage, slice it in half, and then slice the halves into either 2 or 4 pieces (depending on how large a wedge ...


14

According to the USDA: If packaging is accidentally cooked in a conventional oven, is the food safe to eat? Plastic packaging materials should not be used at all in conventional ovens. They may catch on fire or melt, causing chemical migration into foods. Sometimes these materials are inadvertently cooked with a product. For example, giblets ...


14

You cannot add the noodles at the START, because the noodles will get soggy and make you a very unhappy eater. BUT: You can still eat things with pasta, of course! This page advises to add pasta just before the meal is done, and roughly double to triple the cooking-time. Be warned, though: Pasta releases starch when cooking! You may not want the starch in ...


13

If we're talking about a solid, four pound cut of beef - the only flavor you're ever really going to get is on the exterior and just a little bit into the interior of the meat. That said, cooking in the spices/components you list still may provide liquid gold. I would simply take some of the liquid that's leftover in the slow cooker after the roast has ...


11

What you're suggesting was effectively a form of food preservation in medieval times -- just keep the food warm at all times. This works best if you keep adding something to it (not just liquid), so there's something that hasn't completely turned to mush ... and you might want to hit it with a shot of vinegar or citrus to perk it back up when serving. You ...


11

I never worry about this. As your stock simmers, the joints, muscle and connective tissue break down and eventually they'll sink in. Sometimes adding a bit of vinegar to your stock first helps with this. Until then, just stir the stock and move the bones around occasionally.


11

I fully endorse the "when in doubt, throw it out" doctrine, although I personally wouldn't consider a sweet taste to be doubt. As rfusca wisely points out, you can't taste or smell several kinds of contamination, and the ones that you can taste or smell, are usually sour, bitter, or generally pungent. I suggest you have a look at the following question: Is ...


11

A slow cooker needs a lot less water for the same recipe than something you simmer in a pan for 20 minutes. The sauce thickens in the pan because a lot of the water evaporates. In this case, most your water is in the chicken stock. To get all of the flavor, but less moisture, drastically reduce, or even eliminate the stock. You've got plenty of water ...


11

In the question body, you say that you aren't trying to get roasted tomatoes, you are trying to get dried tomatoes. This is a very different process from roasting. Toaster ovens are great for roasting stuff, but regular ovens are much better at drying. To get a nice texture in your dehydrated vegetables, you want to be as gentle as possible. You are trying ...


10

It really isn't that simple. It turns out this question is like "how long does it take to drive 100 miles?" Well, part of the answer is dependent on how fast the car goes! The pork will be fully cooked, and almost certainly palatable to your taste (in terms of doneness which is always well done at these temperatures), if it reaches 165 - 170 F in any case....


10

It doesn't matter if it is covered or not. The inside of the slow cooker will be warm enough to cook the meat. Braising (not submerged) and simmering (submerged) are two methods which both can lead to good results. The "very chewy" result sounds like choosing the wrong type of meat for slow cooking. If it was a real roast, then this is the obvious problem. ...


9

This is the method I use to smoke meat in my Weber! The basics are exactly what you see in the photo, with one more step. Start about a dozen (or in a 22.5" grill like that one, maybe 18-24) briquettes in your charcoal starter (you have one of those right? if not, go get one, they're awesome). When the coals in your starter are glowing, carefully place them ...


9

This article, by a reputable food scientist, summarizes the possible dangers inherent in slow cooking of turkeys, with some scientific citations and actual experimental data on microbiological growth in slow-cooked turkeys. I'd encourage anyone interested in slow cooking to read it to appreciate the great variety of microbes which could cause problems, as ...


9

Meat being "moist" or "dry" is an oversipmlified description of the texture. It is not a straightforward measure of the amount of liquid, and also, meat is not a sponge. When people say that a piece of meat is "moist" or "juicy", they mean a specific texture that includes muscle fibers at a very specific stage of ...


8

Assuming it's a proper removable (some old ones weren't) inner crock pot you could (as in your other answer). BUT That pot will take a long time to warm up when you put it in and turn it on. I would suggest assembling all the ingredients in another container (which may also fit better in the fridge) and turning them out in to the (ideally preheated) crock ...


8

The issue is caramelization-- by cooking onions fairly slowly for a long period of time you can bring out the natural sweetness of the onions and caramelize the natural sugars present in the vegetable. Onion soup (assuming you mean a French onion soup kind of onion soup) starts with caramelized onions and then adds broth, simmers, tops with bread/croutons ...


8

There is conflicting information on the Internet about BBQ short ribs, so, I can see the confusion. Serious Eats suggests that you want to grill short ribs to an internal temperature of about 130 F (54.5C) (medium-rare). They suggest that any hotter, and the fat will start leaking out, drying the final product. Short ribs, grilled in this manner, are ...


8

Your ribs didn't get hot enough to break down the connective tissue, and the connective tissue is tough. You need to cook the ribs to an internal temperature of 180°-205°F. Don't worry about rendering out the fat; the collagen from the connective tissue provides a moist texture. I've smoked beef ribs using this recipe: https://amazingribs.com/tested-...


8

Brisket is not a roasting cut; you didn't miss your train, it never left the station. Brisket is a very tough cut because of the presence of collagen, which breaks down at 72°C, and needs the presence of liquid, so roasting is not a good technique for this cut. If you'd taken it out when the alarm sounded it would be even tougher. You can't roast things in a ...


7

Without any other information, it sounds like you have to assume that your slow cooker has only a warm setting (labeled "low") and a high setting, and use high for cooking. (Usually they have warm, low, and high.) But it's possible that they're just being overly paranoid in the manual. I would personally try heating something on low (possibly just water, as ...


7

Perpetual soup, which is exactly what you're talking about here, was a staple in many old world diets. It's still done in many places around the world today. Poland, Alaska, Russia, and many of the colder environments where it's harder to get food in the winter times. There is a risk to all things cooking no matter the preparation you take. Perpetual soup ...


7

If you're cooking low and slow, with enough liquid, you'll end up with a style of stew called ragoût. The trick is to not add the vegetables during the cooking, unless they're either something that you want to break down, or you've added enough acid to the cooking liquid to prevent onions and potatoes from fully disintegrating. Personally, I prefer to take ...


7

There's no health issue here, the sausages will be cooked enough to be safe. The reason you fry off the sausages first is that you make the casings more edible, get flavor from maillard reactions and browning, and maybe get rid of some of the fat (if you discard the fat that comes out of the sausages that is). I'm thinking that the sausage casings could ...


7

There is almost no such thing as overcooking chicken thighs. Chicken thighs are simply the most forgiving piece of meat known to man. The only thing that concerns me about your plan is that you plan to dice the chicken. There is nothing wrong with that, but diced chicken thighs are very slightly less forgiving than whole chicken thighs. If you do dice them, ...


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