8

Brisket is not a roasting cut; you didn't miss your train, it never left the station. Brisket is a very tough cut because of the presence of collagen, which breaks down at 72°C, and needs the presence of liquid, so roasting is not a good technique for this cut. If you'd taken it out when the alarm sounded it would be even tougher. You can't roast things in a ...


7

You are missing an option, which is to let the meat rest before serving and bake the potatoes at the right temperature. Most meats, especially beef, become more tender if they have a chance to rest, as it lets the fibers relax. This is true of slow cooked meat as well. So, your best option is to take the beef out, keep it covered and crank up the oven for ...


6

While both recipes will produce "cooked chicken thighs", the intended texture of the result is different. In the case of slow cooking, the temperature is meant to be high enough to render out fat and convert collagen into gelatin. The texture of the meat itself will be somewhat stringy and shreddable, with some dryness (hopefully compensated for by ...


5

I use a slow cooker almost every time I cook dried beans, and I don't recommend cutting down on soaking. I typically soak overnight (with a little bicarbonate of soda), and start cooking in the morning, so 10-12 hours soaking + 8-12 hours cooking, avoiding adding (much) acid/salt until towards the end. It's possible your beans soften more easily than mine, ...


5

The solution is real easy and you won't need do any of the crazy stuff mentioned above. Buy some baking paper (brown (sort of waxed) paper that you can line baking trays. The often come ready cut in baking tray sizes, which are plenty big enough. Fine the area that will be in the center of our crock pot when the lid is on. Take a sharp knife and cut an X ...


4

Sure, a few things happen (or, rather, continue to happen) after the first 10-15 minutes. Spices continue to release their flavor. Not a big consideration for finely ground spices, but something like whole coriander, cracked black pepper, or cinnamon bark will definitely have more to give at that point. Vegetables will continue to cook. More cell walls will ...


4

Pork loin is very lean and tender, so it's a bad cut for a slow cooker. Slow cookers work best with fatty or collagen-rich cuts that should be held at a high temperature for long enough for the connective tissue to "melt" and create a super rich, tender result. Pork loin will simply dry out. I would remove it from the cooker and chill until dinner. ...


3

You can use a slow cooker for as big a piece of meat as will fit in it and still allow the lid to close. There is no strict need for extra room in the crock. That said, you will probably want some extra room for spices, stock, et cetera. But so long as you can physically fit all your ingredients, it'll all work.


3

Simple washing (for carrots, or veg. you might peel) is fine, if you don't want to peel. There is no problem using root vegetables without peeling either. Stocks are typically brought to a simmer. So, you easily mitigate any bacterial concerns. Botulism toxins form in an anaerobic environment. So, you don't really have to worry about using fresh, even ...


3

If not consuming right away, it is often recommended to allow meat that was braised to cool, and be refrigerated in its juices. For this reason, many recipes suggest making a braise a day ahead for better flavor. I don't think your concern is break down of the protein, as much as it is shelf life. If you are not going to fully consume the product within 3 ...


2

You have already diagnosed both your problem and the solution. Your intended cooking method is to poach the fish in ghee, you are not poaching it (for poaching, you will have to immerse it in a generous amount of liquid, in this case ghee) and thus it overheats. You should either accept that this dish takes several kilograms of butter, or choose a different ...


2

If I'm slicing, I pull it at 190, then wrap and let it rest for at least an hour or more. The internal temp will continue to rise a bit, but usually stays below 203. The result is pork that is juicy and super tender, but not quite at the 203+ range of pulled.


2

Your braising liquid is now a delicious stock. Congrats! You certainly can store the meat and stock together, but the meat has no color and the result is too wet I find. The meat still has plenty of fat to be succulent on its own. I reserve the stock in the fridge and separate the lard. With the remaining stock I cook black beans. When I reheat the pork, I ...


2

Topside is a good cut of beef for slowly braising, which is what you're doing here. I assume you're following a recipe that calls for 2 hours of cooking? Many recipes for braised meat dishes tend to understate the amount of time it needs to be cooked to become tender (just like how they will tell you you can caramelise onions in 20 minutes). 2 hours is a ...


2

I have gotten away with no soak many times. I often cook beans overnight. I think if you cook for 6 hours + the beans are so soft that soaking in advance does not make much difference. Usually for long cooks I use kidney, red, pinto, turtle beans or black eyed peas. Even with those tough beans and no soak about half have become mush by the end. I have ...


2

The process for cooking slices of brisket is the same for a whole piece, the time involved is needed to break down the tough collagen. Slices the size of yours will take a bit less time to cook than a whole piece as they will heat up faster, but it's not that much of a difference. Your proposed method should do fine.


2

The safety of what you call "leftovers" is exactly the same as the safety of the vegetables they came from (assuming you store them under equal conditions after the vegetable is cut up into leftovers and main part). If you can eat the one, you can eat the other. The whole idea that the leftovers are inedible is also strictly untrue. I had to smirk ...


2

The two cuts come from the same general area. They eye of round is more lean, and generally tougher and less flavorful, given the lack of fat. There is no reason you cannot use the cooking technique described on the top round. Using a thermometer will ensure proper done-ness. It will probably take a bit longer than the more narrow eye roast.


2

Keep the lid on and make sure there is liquid in the pot so it doesn't dry out. The idea of slow cooking isn't that food will only reach temperature at the end of the allocated time, it is that the extended time changes the texture of the meat and allows flavours to develop and blend further.


1

Brisket isn't the greatest cut for roasting, but it is possible. If you haven't fully sliced it, you can submerge it 2/3 in stock and cook it at 140 °C for about three hours or until tender. Then retrieve it and coat it in your favorite BBQ sauce and a rub, then roast at 180 °C for about 30 minutes, or until it looks shiny and somewhat caramelized. If you ...


1

I usually keep a part of the meat in the juices and reheat it that way the next day. Sometimes I divide the meat and liquid and have one portion in the fridge and one in the freezer. If I have enough meat, I will take some out of the juices and cool and/or freeze separately. Depending on the meat it can be used as is or has to go in a dish with a lot of ...


1

There is a reason the recipe must be baked at 220C rather than below 150C. The recipe to be baked at 220C to make it crisp. Allowing it to be baked at 135C even with prolonged exposure wouldn't work because it doesn't reach the temperature it needed. Otherwise, the game of "chicken slapping oven" would be true and defying the physic.


1

You need to drop the temperature more for overnight. The 'danger zone' of food is between 5°C (40°F) and 60°C (140°F), you want to limit the time your tri-tip spends at that temperature range as that's where you get bacterial growth. Anything higher than that is safe from a bacteria perspective. So you could roast your tri-tip at 145°F or thereabouts (a ...


1

You have to cut cornbeef against the grain for slices or it will shred every single time


1

The freezing process will definitely damage the integrity of the fragile fish meat, but that can't be the only explanation to this texture. It looks that your fish is really overcooked, and I can't really understand your recipe, but I don't think that any fish, even the large specimen you mentioned, should be cooked for so long, even at a low temperature. ...


1

Can you put a frozen package of food into a slowcooker and can it handle cooking it without needing to defrost the food (even if there's meat will this work)? I wouldn't risk putting frozen food directly in a slow-cooker. If you are cooking small portions, you could try using the HIGH setting, but it's risky nonetheless. If you choose to use a slow-cooker, I ...


1

If the peas (and beans or lentils for that matter) are old, they will not soften. It is best to buy new ones. Their shelf life is about one year. If you can, try and buy from a place with a regular turn over of stock.


1

Depending on the size of your crockpot, you made need something larger than a toothpick between the lid and the rim of the crock. For a family size pot, I use a chopstick, which is less likely to fall into the food, as a toothpick might.


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