32

Almost exactly what you describe can be done, it’s shown in this video. The sugar isn’t hot blown, it’s isomalt, a lower-calorie sugar substitute used in lower calorie candies and by foodies because it is formable into interesting shapes, like your sphere. It's a sugar alcohol, derived from sugar, and is considered "natural" (see What does "natural&...


22

What you're describing isn't all that different from how they make various products like Liquid Smoke (make smoke along with steam, then condense that steam). You will need to make sure that some actual condensation occurs (for example, by having a lid for the smokey vapor to condense onto). However, it may be simpler to add a liquid smoke-type product ...


13

I have seen smoke presented under glass domes. Clearly the smoke wasn't put in there while making the glass. source: http://www.weekendnotes.com/onyx-dessert-lounge/ Probably the steps are: Make a bunch of spheres or near-spheres (with openings at the bottom) out of sugar and let them cool plate the rest of the dish - some sort of soft stuff to support ...


12

The strongest wood is not always the best wood. Mesquite is by far the strongest smoke wood. But it can be a disaster on anything but beef or fast-cooked foods. Hickory is a good complement to barbecued pork, and is the traditional wood for Carolina barbecue. I like to use hickory and cherry with pulled pork and ribs, myself.


9

Another option is Smoked Paprika. As Jolene wisely cautions, those liquid smoke products are very strong. And even though it might be "natural" smoke flavor, it can lend a "synthetic" taste to delicate foods. Smoked Paprika has a much more subtle smokiness. Of course, it will also add color and additional flavor of its own. It sounds to me like this would ...


8

It's the smoker. I had one of these, and it is extremely flawed in design. The pan that holds the charcoal does not allow for proper air flow to the fuel. Contrast this with a Weber grill, where you put your fuel on an elevated grate with plenty of air beneath it. This Char Broil instead just has a pan that you put on a shelf. Before long your coals are ...


8

To add smoky flavor, you can add a drop of liquid smoke. Do it drop by drop - be careful, it's easy to use too much and not be able to taste anything else. Liquid smoke is actually made by distilling smoke and it really does add a flavor much like putting the food in a smoker (or a big fire).


7

I've definitely done this with ketchup before, with a couple key tweaks: Spreading the sauce onto a rimmed baking sheet. This is to maximize surface area for smoking. I used a Traeger pellet-smoker, so I'm not sure how a Weber might work. I'm not sure how effective this'll be in your case, but the general principle is sound (and delicious). Example recipe ...


5

I have successfully smoked with apple wood chunks wrapped in foil in my outdoor grill. The trick is to find a setting that will maintain ~300 F using 1/2 of the burners. Then place the foil-wrapped chunks on the hot side and the meat on the cool side. The wood will begin to smoke after 10 minutes or so. Keep checking periodically to maintain 300 F. I do ...


5

Mesquite is a very assertive flavor that typically goes with beef, especially fatty beef. Pecan and hickory are stronger than apple, but milder than mesquite, and are great for pork or poultry, and work just fine with beef. Applewood is very flexible, a bit lighter and sweeter. It's the only one of the woods you mentioned that I would consider using with ...


5

Better or worse is a judgement call. Smoking the peppers then making the sauce v. smoking the sauce will produce different results, but both will impart smokiness. So, you can, in fact, impart smoke flavor in a liquid by using a smoker. For example, I've smoked water, then used it to cook eggs.


5

This will definitely work, but I would recommend stirring it every once in a while as it will mostly be affecting only the surface. A shallow vessel with a larger surface area will also impart more smokiness faster.


5

Making the spheres is doable, and getting smoke in is also do-able. However the smoke won't last very long. Smoke is particles suspended in the air, these particles would deposit onto the inside of the shell. You would want to make the spheres ahead of time, leaving a hole in them, then put some smoke into them just before serving. You may want to ...


4

I would suggest either using a commercially available liquid smoke product added after the stir-frying stage. The proper proportion would require some experimentation. Or you could try using a stove top smoker to smoke the meat & (dried) noodles beforehand, (perhaps something par-cooked similarly to the way instant ramen noodles are so there is fat in ...


4

While the some of the other answers point to liquid smoke or actual smoke, I would suggest that the flavour doesn't primarily come from the smoke generated by the fire/stove, but by the wok, the oil and technique itself. Real smoke penetration is a inherently slow process. Stir frying is an extremely fast process. On one of those woks as pictured in your ...


4

Liquid smoke is made from distilling actual smoke and so, to some degree, it tastes like the wood it comes from. For example, I can detect fruity apple notes in apple wood. Of course, the flavor of smoke itself is far more potent than any of the notes imparted by the type of the wood. In my experiments, I have found that any kind of wood (or liquid smoke) ...


3

I see chefs using "smoking guns" on food network competitions all the time. It's a tiny "gun" with a heating element. When a small amount of wood is placed in it and it is turned on, the smoke will exit a tube at the end. If food is placed in a plastic bag and twist tied around the tube the smoke can cold-smoke the food.


3

Take a large cardboard box. Lay it so the top is facing a side. Cut a small whole to allow for a plug. Place a electric 5th burner inside. Use a super cheap pan as your wood pan. Put a rack on some rocks to lift it up. Place food on rack. Heat on medium. Tape box closed. You can find videos on YouTube.


3

There is the same concept for ice balls with smoke inside in this drink recipe: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ur08cq2qHV0 Maybe it can give some useful tips.


3

Presumably you'd blow sugar like you'd blow glass - with a blowpipe (likely not as long as needed for glass, since temperatures are a lot lower), from a molten vat at the correct temperature, and without sucking back. That should be feasible, but somewhat challenging. Smoke in the middle would be ephemeral (sure, you could presumably work out blowing it in ...


3

You could use the smoked salt, but it would not impart that much smoked flavor and would be quite expensive compared to normal kosher salt. Since most wet-cured bacon available at the grocery store is flavored with liquid smoke, an easy alternative would be to rub the belly with liquid smoke prior to roasting as described at The Splendid Table. As a side ...


3

I've got a very similar model smoker. Some things to consider: Ignore the temp gauge on the front. Buy an oven thermometer or a probe thermometer with multiple probe jacks and mount one on your grate. The front therm is placed in such a way that it won't ever read the grate temp, even if it was calibrated properly (it probably isn't). As the other answer ...


3

I would go with hickory; it always taste strong, and it is the best for me.


3

Smoking time depends very much on what you are smoking and the size if it. It is possible to smoke meat too much, it is important not to strangle the original flavor of what you are smoking. Mussels for example, should only have a couple of minutes, since they have a very delicate flavor. Fillet of trout should have some 20 minutes, sausages a couple of ...


3

For overall full-flavor, these instructions produce the best cup: Use a teapot and cup made from glass, or other material like porcelain. Use soft water for preparation of tea. This is suitable to effectively extract most of the substances from the tea leaves. Hard water is not suitable because it contains higher levels of mineral ions which ...


2

Interestingly, smoke capture is higher for cold, moist meats. See Greg Blonder's fascinating site. Some people also argue that soaking wood has little impact on smoke quality.


2

I would use smoked salt. Since I saw this video Justin Wilson Oysters and Crabs I'm using it. And man this is the thing. I was using different "smoked sauces", the thing with smoking the meat in an oven with some wood (similar to the method in your link), liquid smoke. Nothing can beat the salt trick. It's cheap, easy, you don't add additional taste (...


1

1 heavy wok. Good tight lid. Cast iron is best. 1 round rack in bottom. Heat wok till it smokes. 1 bags tea used then dried well. Drop in tea. turn of high heat. Put duck or chicken on rack. Put on tight lid. Wait till wok cools. 1 tea smoked duck or chicken. Now bake or fix bird. This is best done outside. 1 roasting pan. 1 rack in it. 1 tinfoil pack ...


1

I love smoking, and this is of course a matter of taste, but I think I got the best results with pieces of apple, cherry and peach, soaked overnight.


1

There are many different woods used for smoking throughout the world, each giving a characteristic flavor, intensity, and color to the foods that are smoked with it. You are not going to get the "hickory smoked" taste by using anything but hickory. Here is the list of common smoking woods given by Nathan Myhrvold in Modernist Cuisine Vol 2: grapevine straw ...


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