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22

What you're describing isn't all that different from how they make various products like Liquid Smoke (make smoke along with steam, then condense that steam). You will need to make sure that some actual condensation occurs (for example, by having a lid for the smokey vapor to condense onto). However, it may be simpler to add a liquid smoke-type product ...


16

You can't just pick up any old wood chips but you can get ones for cooking at the hardware store. Even Home Depot or Lowes should have wood-for-smoking available. You have to be careful since if you get chips made out of treated lumber for example the resulting smoke could be poisonous. Probably not something you want to eat. You also want to avoid ...


13

Take cheesecloth and soak it in melted butter and drape it over the bird before you put it in the smoker. This will protect the skin during the long slow smoking process. You may want to pull the cheesecloth off about 30 minutes before you are done. This will give you a nice golden brown skin that is not leathery. I first read of doing this with a smoked ...


13

The Maillard reaction occurs about 280 to 330 °F depending on the food. For meats this denaturing of the proteins also results in the release of water, so the meat gets hard and dry. By cooking at a "low" temperature, you cook at temperatures below which the Maillard reaction occurs. Well done beef has a resting temperature of 155 to 160 °F. So cooking at ...


12

Soaking wood chips accomplishes almost nothing, as proven here. Summary from amazing ribs link: Soaking wood does not work, as it takes more than days to saturate wood. And temperature measurements from wood soaked for a day show little change Their recommendation: have two containers of wood, one dry, and one covered with water (steam is required as well)....


11

Chewy means undercooked. Most of your standard "barbecue cuts" of meat contain a lot of connective tissue. This must be rendered to achieve tenderness. This goes for brisket, pork butt, and ribs, to name a few. If you are using the words "chewy" or "tough" to describe the texture of your meat, in nearly all cases it has not been cooked enough. Your time/...


10

First thing I would recommend is not spraying down the skin with the oil/apple juice mixture. There is plenty of fat in chicken skin. No need to add more. And spraying the skin will just keep it from rendering out the unwanted fat and other tissue, thus preventing it from crisping. The other thing I would suggest is to turn the heat up on the chicken. Low ...


10

No, it isn't possible to over soak wood chips, chunks, planks, or any other size that you want to throw on the grill (within reason, I wouldn't soak them for weeks because the water would get scummy). In fact, the directions given often grossly underestimate optimal soaking time. I assume this is because the manufacturer doesn't want to scare people off by ...


9

Chicken is difficult to get right in a smoker. Cooking at really low temperatures can result in a rubbery skin. Chicken is one meat where I've never seen the need to go low/slow. Brine the bird if you're worried about drying it out or if you want to get some extra flavor into the meat, but it's not necessary. In any event, make sure you get the skin dry ...


9

I don't like the recipe much. First of all, paella is a one pan dish, normally. That is, all ingredients are cooked in the same pan (paella) and in sequence. This means that all the flavors are stacked one on top of the other. Second, if you are going to use saffron, the most expensive spice in the world, hold down on any other spices. In particular, most ...


9

From what I can tell you're generally on the right track here. From what you've said, there are probably just a few issues. tough/dry/rough. Believe it or not not cooking long enough could be the problem here. You want your brisket to get in that 190-200 range, this will cause the connective tissue to break down and make it very nice. The other possibility ...


9

This is the method I use to smoke meat in my Weber! The basics are exactly what you see in the photo, with one more step. Start about a dozen (or in a 22.5" grill like that one, maybe 18-24) briquettes in your charcoal starter (you have one of those right? if not, go get one, they're awesome). When the coals in your starter are glowing, carefully place them ...


9

Another option is Smoked Paprika. As Jolene wisely cautions, those liquid smoke products are very strong. And even though it might be "natural" smoke flavor, it can lend a "synthetic" taste to delicate foods. Smoked Paprika has a much more subtle smokiness. Of course, it will also add color and additional flavor of its own. It sounds to me like this would ...


9

That cut of beef is OK for 'low and slow' however, you did not provide 'low and slow.' At 300, even wrapped, the internal temperature gets high enough that it will expel moisture. This is happening at the tissue/cellular level, so the wrapping won't stop that. The thing that could have helped is to keep it wrapped and let it cool to almost room temperature....


8

If you're putting your wood chips directly on a fire, it's good to soak them (and that means real soaking--a few days--not an hour or two). This prevents the wood chips from actually catching fire, which can cause off flavors from combustion chemicals settling back on your food. Tastes kinda like a brand new telephone pole smells on a hot day. Tar/Creosote, ...


8

Boiling chicken bones for an extended period of time (4+ hours) will cause bones to go squishy. I'm assuming any long duration slow cook method will do the same.


8

OK - for my bona fides, I'm a microbiologist and have made a career of quality control in food processing including meat processing so I know what I am talking about. There are two kinds of smoked pork chops, cold smoked and hot smoked. Cold smoked pork chops aren't heat processed, so they aren't cooked. They have the redder color and the more resilient, ...


8

While cooking low and slow has its advantages, 6 hours is a bit too long. You should be able to complete a 6 pound chicken in 1 1/2 - 2 hours @ 275°F [135°C]. Some things to remember that might help you out: You are going for an internal temp of 160°F [70°C] in the breast meat and 170°F [75°C] at the thigh. Every time you open the smoker you are allowing ...


8

It's the smoker. I had one of these, and it is extremely flawed in design. The pan that holds the charcoal does not allow for proper air flow to the fuel. Contrast this with a Weber grill, where you put your fuel on an elevated grate with plenty of air beneath it. This Char Broil instead just has a pan that you put on a shelf. Before long your coals are ...


8

To add smoky flavor, you can add a drop of liquid smoke. Do it drop by drop - be careful, it's easy to use too much and not be able to taste anything else. Liquid smoke is actually made by distilling smoke and it really does add a flavor much like putting the food in a smoker (or a big fire).


8

What it looks like you have there is a Pastrami. Though not a particularly 'good' one, perhaps made from Eye of Round rather than brisket. It has been brined (soaked in a salt solution) in order to preserve the meat and then smoked (most likely to an internal temperature of 175°F (80°C)). This should make the meat 'completely safe' from food borne illnesses ...


7

All we can tell you that is provably true is that heating any oil or fat past its smoke point causes rapid oxidation and more-or-less mimics the effect of rancidity. You should do your own research on sites like Google Scholar or just ask your family doctor or dietitian if you want opinions on whether or not this leads to longer-term health complications. ...


7

You may want to check out the following pages: What Influences Cooking Time Thermodynamics of Cooking Using their methods, I have not had a shoulder take 15 hours to come to temperature at a smoker temperature of 225 (computer-controlled). I have never done whole hog, but as Jefromi stated the actual method of cooking makes a significant difference. The ...


7

I've definitely done this with ketchup before, with a couple key tweaks: Spreading the sauce onto a rimmed baking sheet. This is to maximize surface area for smoking. I used a Traeger pellet-smoker, so I'm not sure how a Weber might work. I'm not sure how effective this'll be in your case, but the general principle is sound (and delicious). Example recipe ...


6

A pressure cooker for a long time will make chicken bones go mushy. My father-in-law likes his chicken done that way. Goes well with the false teeth. Also I know a German lady how makes her chicken stock / broth that way.


6

The health concern is a moot point, really. Why are you using olive oil if you're heating it past the smoke point? At best, that means it's lost its flavor, and if there's enough of it to actually taste, it'll taste burned. So you might as well just use a different kind of oil with a higher smoke point - whatever suits you healthwise, presumably something ...


6

The first thing I would suggest is finding a copy of "Food and Beverage Mycology, 2nd. Edition" by Larry R. Beuchat. There are two chapters that are directly pertinent to your question: "field and storage fungi" (p211-232) and "mycotoxins" (p517-570). However, in order to specifically answer the question, one would need to be familiar with three additional ...


6

I've never thought of turkey as gamey at all, but that's just my own taste I guess. It sounds to me you want a milder bird, in which case you want to buy a cheap battery bird. Gameyness comes from exercise and diet, the blander diet and less exercise the milder (read blander) bird you get. Don't go free-range, get store-brand.


6

Smoke first, then sous vide. There are a few reasons as to why you could smoke first: (i) It has been shown that cold food/meat will take on smoke flavor better than warm meat (Source: AmazingRibs) (ii) If you do sous vide and then smoke, you might risk overcooking the meat since the temperature in your smoker can run higher than your sous vide. Doing ...


5

Tremmors and Rincewind42 are both right, but it does sound strange that an hour or two in a smoker would make the bones that soft. Maybe Mabel pre-cooks them, possibly using a pressure cooker?


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