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Use measured amounts of ingredients like smoke salt or liquid smoke. If your current methods of introducing the smoky flavor to a dish can't be easily measured, you could consider using alternative methods to do so that could be. For example, you could measure out an amount of an additive like liquid smoke or smoke salt that you could add to the dish. That ...


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My BBQing colleagues use the cut-test - a ring of smoke penetration can be seen (in pork and chicken at least, I don't know about darker meats) in the meat that has some bearing on how heavily the meat has been smoked. I don't know if this is standard practice or just something they came up with (Edit: turns out it is something BBQ judges look for). It seems ...


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I know of no such scale, however you could use a Subjective Organoleptic approach, which is how the Scoville chili heat scale worked (although they use a chemistry based approach for the most part now). My understanding of it is that you dilute food and test how much of it you need to detect the quality you are looking for, like sweet, acidity or smokiness. ...


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Well... yes. There are analytic chemistry techniques used to measure the concentration of phenols, which are the primary contributors to a "smoky" flavor. You could test samples taken from the meat at different depths to measure penetration. You'd need a reasonably well-outfitted chemistry lab to do a good job of this. Honestly, though, objective ...


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Grill season! It is grill season in ATL! Actually it is always grill season in ATL. When I am cooking something I know will make a lot of greasy smoke I take it to the grill, because it is outside. You can use a pan on the grill (cast iron skillet is perfect) or you can put some foil down and cook on top of that (skillet would be better because of the ...


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There is absolutely no way to completely avoid smoke while searing meat in olive oil. The process happens far above the smoke point of the oil (not to mention, of the meat itself). Smoke is going to happen. With that said, if you use an oil with a higher smoke point (canola or grapeseed come to mind), and use very little of it, the smoke output will be ...


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