15

For smoothies, the main body of the drink is fruit that has been blended with some limited quantity of liquid or ice. Typically, one of the fruits is banana, and other fruits (berries, strawberries, kiwi, etc.) are added for flavor. They often include a sweetener of some sort, such as honey or turbinado sugar. Milk Shakes are typically composed primarily of ...


10

Apple juice will give you very little additional taste, but it will sweeten your smoothie. Especially filtered apple juice has a rather subtle flavor which is easily covered by other fruit flavors. Juice producers use this to make their juices cheaper - if a juice advertises 100% fruit, and a flavor from an expensive, non-juicy fruit like strawberries, it is ...


9

Yes, it makes it less flavorful. That doesn't necessarily mean it's a bad idea. Often it'll still be plenty flavorful even with a decent amount of ice in it. So by using ice, you save the trouble of having to freeze some ingredients first, and don't go through your fruit quite as fast. You can avoid having to keep fruit juice on hand. It also lets you ...


8

No, they are similar, but not identical. A milkshake is generally made from ice cream, milk, and perhaps flavoring such as chocolate syrup or a small amount of fruit, blended together as a sweet drinkable confection. Ice cream is the characteristic ingredient in a milk shake. A smoothie is a puree of fruit and other ingredients, often one or more of ...


8

As Catohound already mentioned, it's a symptom of using a high speed blender. You may find this technique useful. Tcrn the blender to its lowest setting and then slowly ramp it up until the top of the liquid just starts to circulate (usually around speed 4 or 5 on a Vitamix). As you run it at this low speed, you will see bubbles coming out in the ...


7

I think the central argument for ice is efficiency. Sure, using "4 oz acai, grape, or pomegranate juice" as well as 4 oz amounts of rather potent fruits such as "strawberries, blueberries, peaches" will result in a fantastic smoothie. But the ingredients in the quoted recipe are packed with flavor, and some of them are also quite expensive. Adding ice ...


7

I make smoothies almost daily and have made them both with and without ice. You can add ice for a variety of reasons but they all come down to personal preference. Some of the reasons that I prefer adding ice include: Adds bulk so it takes longer to drink and fills me up more Gives the drink more texture similar to small cubed ice which I prefer Keeps the ...


6

During blending, air is put into the milk mixture. Once you switch it off, not all air is kept inside the milk but makes it's way to the surface. These are the bubbles that make you think your milk is fizzy. Without being a chemist I assume full fat milk has more fat, therefore the emulsion is somewhat "thicker" and thus can hold the air better. There are ...


6

I could not find (quick search) a reference to the fact that using a metal bowl "destroys" vitamins. Aluminum bowls will react to some ingredients, mostly acidic ones (tomatoes, citrus..), but in a normal usage (blending fruits) , it should not be a problem. Stainless steel bowls are NON reactive, and can be used with all ingredients, and usually sturdy ...


5

One problem that I've had in the past with making smoothies ahead of time is getting the right consistency because many smoothie recipes rely on ice or frozen fruit to thicken them and thus are not great after several hours in the refrigerator. I found and have been been playing with a make-ahead recipe that includes oatmeal and chia seeds placed dry in the ...


5

When you blitz your smoothie in the blender a certain amount of air is incorporated. This will naturally make its way back out over time, decreasing the volume of the overall mix.


5

Your requirements appear to be for a "raw food" blender, the motor on those units are typically well above 500 watts (1000+ Watts). This enables harder/tough foods (such as ice, kale, nuts) to be broken down smooth enough that no sieving is required, with less risk of overheating the motor. Note: when a blender has a nut bag, or a nut bag option, it ...


5

You can eat raspberries. You can chew them as much as you like, without dying. Your teeth (unless yours are suffering great defects) are perfectly capable of crushing the seeds. So, you are seeing a problem that does not exist, by over-generalizing something quite inapplicable.


5

It sounds like this a juice recipe, not a smoothie recipe. It may work if you put it in your blender, as I've seen recipes for smoothies with similar ingredients like this one but it will probably need some more liquid. When you juice, you definitely use raw fruits and vegetables but you need to run it through a juicer which will remove most of the solids, ...


4

Personally, I can't drink thick liquids if they are not icy - I gag. Drinkable yogurt, milkshakes that have melted, ice-less smoothies, etc. are all a complete no-go for me. Sure, most people don't have this reaction, but I'm betting I'm not the only one. For whatever reason, the ice particles make it far more agreeable to me. Additionally, it can help to ...


4

Your existing solution is the best I know of. It preserve the vegetables (or fruit) for a long time. 2 weeks are impossible at room temperature. You also get them frozen at the time of making the smoothie. Assuming that you want a cool smoothie, starting with half the mass frozen is very beneficial, because the blender heats the ingredients while pureeing ...


4

The party line from Still Tasty is to: Cut out the stems, wash, and blanche for about 2 minutes Dry Store in freezer bags with as little air as possible They indicate you will get about a year of storage from this method. That being said, the method you propose is well known for herbs, and kale is certainly much heartier than an herb. It should work very ...


4

You could try agave nectar -- but I'm not sure if it will be that much of an improvement over honey. A tiny pinch of salt might also help make the smoothie taste sweeter. Usually though, if I want my smoothies to be sweeter I just add more juice or fruit (e.g. ripe berries, peaches etc).


4

My favorite smoothie thickener is chia seed. A tablespoon will thicken a blender of smoothie into pudding. According to the internet it is also a low FODMAP food. It is a small, black seed which will change the texture a bit. With raspberry or strawberry or vanilla they are lost among the other seeds. It has the added benefit of being neutrally flavored ...


3

I make protein smoothies (whey protein, fresh fruit, yogurt, ice, almond milk) the night before and notice a big difference in taste. It obviously does not taste as fresh if drank the same day and not as good.


3

In general, how do you shop for one when the only information a seems to be total power and the number of presets? Product reviews from real users is your best tool. Problem: it is time consuming to read many reviews and weed it down to the helpful ones, and the comments are not always accurate. I heavily rely on Amazon reviews, even if I don't end up ...


3

Pits from stone fruits trees from the Prunus genus such as cherries, apricots and peaches can pose a risk of cyanide poisoning if crushed and ingested in significant amounts. From foodsafety.govt.nz CYANOGENIC GLYCOSIDES - INFORMATION SHEET THE COMPOUNDS Cyanogenic glycosides or cyanoglycosides account for approximately 90% of the wider group of plant ...


3

You can add some sugar, but if you want to watch your sugar intake you can try using baking soda. You need only a small amount of baking soda. Roughly 1/4 teaspoon of baking soda for 1 cup of liquid should be enough. Too much baking soda can lead to a soapy taste, so use it sparingly.


2

At least one recipe specifies “horchata will keep in the fridge for up to 7 days,” another “up to four days,” others more vaguely “a few days” or “several days.” Note that it also depends on whether the recipe you're using adds milk or not, if it “is made without milk it will keep in the frig for various days.” Probably the best piece of advice is this one: ...


2

You need to add some kind of liquid to a smoothie to get the right consistency; otherwise it'll be too thick. Milk does that in your current recipe. Replacing the milk with juice would get you a more fruity, less milkshakey flavor to the drink (I prefer mine that way and use a variety of juices rather than soymilk). Juices tend to be sweet, so you won't need ...


2

Maple syrup is great in smoothies! You only need maybe a tablespoon-full or so and at that amount the taste isn't overpowering or anything.


2

The outer leaves would be a better substitute for kale. My reasoning is that the kale plant is fully exposed to light. With the cabbage only the outer leaves get to enjoy the sun, thus the greenness. I would say flavour wise the outer leaves come closer to kale too. The cabbage core tends to be sweeter.


2

It makes no good sense to use ice in smoothies. Alton Brown's smoothie recipe is the highest reviewed on Food Network, and uses no ice at all. 4 ounces plain, low-fat soy milk 4 ounces acai, grape, or pomegranate juice 4 ounces frozen banana 4 ounces frozen strawberries 4 ounces frozen blueberries 4 ounces frozen peaches ...


2

Your first option are thickeners. I won't be counting them all off my fingers, see http://blog.khymos.org/recipe-collection/ and choose the ones which fit your dietary restrictions. For example, gelatine will work, and so will starch. You'd need to cook your smoothie and let it cool for the starch, but you could alternatively prepare a thickish starch ...


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