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8

Recipes for homemade wasabi peas involve soaking, boiling, and then low-temperature roasting (essentially dehydrating) the peas. Split peas are produced by simply drying the peas after they're harvested and then removing their skins. So the reason is that the snack peas are cooked while the split peas are essentially raw. The cooking process breaks down ...


6

First off, if they're the texture of raisins, they aren't the sort of freeze-dried strawberries the recipe wants - what it wants is something totally dry, almost the texture of styrofoam. They should crunch if you bite into them, and slowly rehydrate in your mouth if you eat one without crunching. They'll look like full-sized slices of strawberry, only dry. ...


5

You are using the wrong tool for the job, what you need is a food processor, not a blender. A blender is designed for liquids, not solids, and the blade doesn't reach the edge. The blogger may have just used the wrong word, or maybe has a blender with a separate chopper attachment. You don't need to spend a bomb, I used a stick blender with a food ...


5

It sounds like what you need is a powder, you could try a protein powder, or you could use peanut butter powder, which is a good thickener. Chia powder is also a great binder. Another option would be a gum like xanthan or guar gum. Heat is another option if you aren't baking these already, heat will drive out moisture and help the mix crystallize.


4

I think you've misunderstood people talking about sodium; I would expect they are generally just talking about table salt, NaCl. Addressing your question about quantity, it's very common that when cooking, people judge ingredients by eye and by their expectation of what a normal quantity would be, so use much less salt than a restaurant or commercial ...


4

Reformed This is most often used to describe meat products such as "reformed ham" or "reformed scampi". You can occasionally see onion rings made with chopped onion described as reformed, e.g. here. Pringles could be described as "reformed potato snacks" for example. Pringles are less than half potato though, so that may not be entirely accurate. As for ...


3

This is funny because: In English they are called " fried snacks" :) But it's a polish thing, they are called "przysmak świętokrzyski" or "crates". It's basically wheat flour (97,5%) and water. Then fried. I think there is only one company that make them https://www.wspspolem.com.pl/produkty/snack-przysmak-swietokrzyski/snack-kratka/ and although they write ...


3

Yes, it is indeed jalebi. Everyone, go out to your local Indian eatery and try it out!


2

I once attempted to make Brussel Sprout Chips (in much the same way you can make Kale chips)... That worked... now if you can make a wasabi sauce/dressing or sprinkle freshly grated Wasabi so it bakes onto the sprout leaves you may have something... Preheat the oven to moderate oven 180°C/350°F. Remove the leaves of the brussels sprouts. This is tedious ...


2

Next time get the really really small ones. Those are best raw. The bigger ones usually are fried first before eating. Then the bones get crunchy and the saltiness is not as prominent. Others are used for stocks or garnishes, as said before.


2

Based on my russian experience, this is ready to go snack. Just bite it and drink beer. I know, my american friends usually scared to try "uncooked" fish, but salty dried fish is good. Also I would recommend you to try salty dried calamari or octopuses. Cheers!


2

Your question intrigued me and I'm curious to know what these rotis are like. I make rotis often and have for a number of decades but I learned how originally from a Punjabi family. I don't really make them the same way as I've developed my own method over time. I use a mix of white flour, whole wheat and soy flour with a handful of wheat germ added. I don't ...


2

A hard boiled egg is high in protein and comes in a handy natural container.


2

My answer here would be "no". Even if it is not impossible, it is rather impractical to pursue this. This may surprise some people, because as a home cook, it is pretty easy to take some grain and process it into small-sized particles. But what is difficult is to take some grain and process it into particles which are very tiny of consistent size ...


2

The answer is "no", but probably not for the reasons you imagined it. The most widespread mental model on taste is what I would all "analytical": salt ions hit the receptors on your tongue, your brain notices the signal and you say to yourself, "this tastes salty", and this is taste. I have the impression that the above model is ...


1

I too think you have mis-understood what happens when the sodium is declared on the product nutritional information. To get the sodium content (and other contents too), the food-stuff undergoes a chemical assay that measures the quantity of whatever they are looking for. This will be done in an analytical laboratory using specialist equipment that can ...


1

I think the hollow comes from air expanding while frying the dough. At first I thought it was made like an Italian bucatini (with a die), but watching videos showing how Thaenkuzhal is made, I think it's only air expanding


1

this might just work: let's say there's about a half-cup (or just over 100 ml) of crumbs preheat your oven to 200F (about 90C) with the door closed take a paper towel and tear it in half get one half completely wet with water, but squeeze it out enough so it's not dripping put it in the bag and shake-shake-shake. this gets a little water more-or-less ...


1

You can make black sesame seed soup. It's mildly sweet and is often eaten at breakfast by Chinese. Black sesame seeds are unhulled unlike most (white) sesame seeds sold in North America and Europe which are hulled. So if you eat the seeds whole, you'll get little benefit from them as they basically pass through your digestive tract unchanged. The soup uses ...


1

I don't believe they have a name in English. A known brand name of a snack made from the same material is Pom Bears, but just like the grid thingies, it is very strongly associated with the shape, to the point where a snack with the same content but different shape will be considered to be a different "thing". You can try calling them "crisps" but even in ...


1

The relatively new term of Molecular Gastronomy, I think would apply, though my saying so I am sure would cause practitioners to cringe. MG is the aspect of food science which studies the physical and chemical transforming of food to study effects on flavor and form. The term is normally applied to the mad scientists of the kitchen, like Hester Blumenthal,...


1

How about low-fat cottage cheese? It would be easy to put in your bag; it is fairly high in protein, and low in carbohydrates. You can throw it into a smoothy too.


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