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41

What you're describing sounds like jallab. From Will Travel For Food: Jallab is a very popular drink in the Middle East. It’s made by diluting the syrup made of grape molasses, dates and rose water with water and serving it in a tall glass with crushed ice. It’s always topped with nuts, most of the time pine nuts and golden raisins, because a jallab ...


31

Apple juice is good with pork. The frozen cans of concentrate are cheap and perfect for this use. Apple juice lacks the dark notes of cola. To get those I propose you add hoisin sauce. It is very sweet, a great mix with pork (I have some boneless ribs soaking in some right now awaiting the grill) and will lend the apple juice more of a dark sweet tone. ...


25

That's most likely Jallab though not a quintessential Israeli drink it is part of the middle eastern cuisine. Jallab (Arabic: جلاب / ALA-LC: jallāb) is a type of fruit syrup popular in the Middle East made from carob, dates, grape molasses and rose water. Jallab is very popular in Jordan, Syria, Palestine and Lebanon. It is made mainly of grape molasses, ...


18

I doubt the raw batter will survive 35-70 minutes out of the oven. Many times when I made homemade cake, things like forgetting to preheat the oven taking too long to scrape all the batter into the baking pan taking too long decorating the top of the cake batter when its in the pan rewards me with a flat cake. On the other hand, after adding the wet ...


14

The main function that soda adds in these recipes is as a flavored syrup that also has an acid. So make your own. Add your preferred sweetener to water with some form of acidulation (I prefer apple cider vinegar with pork) and a few spices and you will have something suitable to use.


13

The last layer will likely be pretty flat, especially if you're using a recipe with whisked eggs for some structure. Any air bubbles and structure you whisk into the eggs will be gone by the time it's been standing on the counter while the first two layers bake. And you will lose some lift from the baking soda reacting with acid in the batter. You will get ...


12

I learned a recipe for a chicken dish from my mother. Her recipe also called for cola to create a sticky and caramelised sauce. She taught me, however, that the cola could be replaced with fruit juice. Her preference was a mix of pineapple, mango, and orange juice. Shops where I live call this juice mix "tropical fruit" juice. It stands to reason, though, ...


9

When carbonated root beer comes into contact with the ice cream, carbon dioxide bubbles are released. Likewise, the soda helps to free air bubbles trapped in the ice cream. The fat in the ice cream coats all these bubbles, protecting them and allowing them to expand to create the huge heads of foam you see on root beer floats. https://wonderopolis.org/...


6

More sodastream bottles is the best option if you are starting from a sodastream. The best other alternative is to act just like a really old-fashioned soda counter. Mix and store your syrups/flavors. Measure syrup into the glass. Add plain soda-water and mix. Thus, your sodastream bottle only ever has plain carbonated water in it, not a specific flavor.


6

tl;dr: Grapefruit oil is the most likely missing link. Squeeze some grapefruit peels into your mix, or pick up a "food-grade" or "therapy-grade" essential oil (for extremely sparing use). In the absence of more information, I'll go ahead and take a broad pass at this. As I mention in comments, more data will help us get closer. As a starting point, let'...


5

The solubility of carbon dioxide in water is a function of several factors. The most important are time, temperature, pressure, and composition. In order to maximize your carbonation, ensure everything is as cold as possible. The colder the liquid, the more CO2 you can dissolve in the liquid. Secondly, you will need high pressure. The higher the pressure ...


4

The flavors in Coke are cinnamon, vanilla, and citrus. I personally taste cinnamon the most. Dr. Pepper has a lot of other spice and berry flavors, and is similar to root beer. You could try to recreate the cola taste by using apple cider vinegar and adding cinnamon, vanilla, and molasses.


4

What about something like Hansen's? It's available at the local store here in Nowheresville, MN population ~7k so it shouldn't be too hard to find.


3

I think I know what you mean, but is the ice cream "crispy" only on the surface? Unless your ice cream becomes crispy in its interior as well, (which I could not explain), I think it's simply as you speculate, the water in the soda is freezing into a crust of ice around the surface of the ice cream ball. This would explain why it is more noticeable when the ...


3

OK, this is dangerously close to a recipe request, but far enough away that I feel OK to answer. Use the rule of two. 2 cups of sugar 2 two oranges 2 limes 2 lemons Juice and zest the whole fruit. Strain and and fill to 1 gallon with water. Filter if you want it to be clear. Carbonate using whatever technique you normally use whether that's a ...


3

If you follow the process, the yeast are not cold-tolerant strains and shut down for most intents and purposes when the bottles are chilled. Plastic soda bottles also take a LOT of pressure to burst, and unlike glass you CAN gauge the pressure by feeling them (and they don't make shards if they do explode, but they sure do make a mess.) This is pretty much ...


3

The whole quote is Cooking the leaves with soda can make them more poisonous by producing soluble oxalates I can't tell you if the claim as a whole is true. But if it is true for the leaves, it is true for the stems too. Rhubarb contains oxalic acid and its salts which are created by the acid reacting with different metal ions such as calcium and ...


3

Nitrogen and probably N2O don't dissolve well in water so that wont work. CO2 dissolves well + forms a weak acid that converts back to CO2 as the CO2 is released from the water. That is why almost all bubbly drinks use CO2. There are some other gasses that would work (aka non toxic and dissolve well but they are too expensive. So N2O soda no... or not ...


3

I have developed an intolerance to eggs and sought some advice from a vegan Indian family I know. They have always used soda in their cakes. Since they've never had a cake made with eggs they admitted they have no way to compare the cakes but they said it is spongy and not dry. For them it isn't a matter of simple nutrition but a cultural and religious diet.


2

I'm fairly sure that you should be able to get a "rebuild kit" with all the rubber parts (and perhaps a few others.) Due to the wonders of modern commerce, it's anybody's guess as to whether you might well be able to find a complete new siphon for less cost. If you have a second-hand store or frequent tag sales you can almost certainly find one barely used ...


2

Soda-like drinks have traditionally been made in the same way as beer, but with less fermentation to keep the alcohol content low. Without alcohol, (and with a bunch of protein and fat around from the yogurt) you run the risk of growing some botulism in your soda. Some traditional fermentation techniques carry risk of botulism, and any 'new' technique should ...


2

I definitely taste Grapefruit, but I suspect there is a bit of Mango as well as the Lime and Lemon. I think the Mango might be what adds a bit of the candy like flavor to it (asides from the sugar).


2

Cake recipes that heavily use syrup (especially inverted syrup/honey due to its non-crystallizing, moisture-keeping properties) and can work well without eggs are not uncommon (several types of Gingerbread/Ontbijkoek/Syrup Cake...) Now soft drinks (not the diet type suggested in that recipe, oddly, unless it uses sugar alcohols) ARE (thin) syrups. ...


2

Depending on how much time you have, how often you would like to use this (or similar) recipes, how much you like the idea(s), and how involved you want to get... you could try making a cola syrup recipe*. You could even reconstitute it with club soda, or carbonated or sparkling water, or use water, a sprinkle of yeast, and some time to turn your syrup into ...


2

Tried an experiment today to make sure I liked their flavours before taking a plunge for the machine. Sealed 2 litre bottle of Walmart Club Soda left in fridge overnight. Poured 500ml into a glass. Very bubbly indeed. Added SodaStream Diet Cola concentrate... drink was substantially flat within 2 minutes even if covered. Theory? Most commercially sold ...


2

Generally with a 1L siphon it’s advised to use 2 or 3 charges. If you scale down your ingredients, you’ll create a much larger gap in the canister, this would mean you’d have to use even more charges which is not really safe at all! If you’d like to scale down your recipe, you should also scale down your canister size too. Try using 0.25 or 0.5 liter ...


1

Acidity regulator E330 is citric acid. I found no indication that it's chemically instable at temperatures < 100°C and a study found it stable over a period of 5 months. Additive E211 is sodium benzoate that's used to stop bacterial and fungal growth in acidic foods and drinks. A study found that over a period of 90 days 4 - 8% of sodium benzoate ...


1

The buttermilk is acidic enough that it interferes with the environment that commercial yeast needs to reproduce well I don't think this is the case. Yeast prefers a mildly to moderately acidic environment: pH 4.5 - 6 (7 is neutral). The various sources I've found give a pH of 4.1 - 5 for straight buttermilk, and of course that pH is buffered (brought ...


1

if it tasted extra 'yeasty' you're probably just fermenting too far. try starting with less of the bug per liter of liquid, and stop the fermentation sooner.


1

Carbonated liquids lose their carbonation very quickly when at room temperature, when agitated, and when pushed through small orifices at room pressure. You can't change the "small orifices" part due to your bottle design (and, honestly, these aren't that small so it isn't as bad as, say, a needle valve). But you can change the temperature. Cool the ...


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