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41

What you're describing sounds like jallab. From Will Travel For Food: Jallab is a very popular drink in the Middle East. It’s made by diluting the syrup made of grape molasses, dates and rose water with water and serving it in a tall glass with crushed ice. It’s always topped with nuts, most of the time pine nuts and golden raisins, because a jallab ...


31

Apple juice is good with pork. The frozen cans of concentrate are cheap and perfect for this use. Apple juice lacks the dark notes of cola. To get those I propose you add hoisin sauce. It is very sweet, a great mix with pork (I have some boneless ribs soaking in some right now awaiting the grill) and will lend the apple juice more of a dark sweet tone. ...


25

That's most likely Jallab though not a quintessential Israeli drink it is part of the middle eastern cuisine. Jallab (Arabic: جلاب / ALA-LC: jallāb) is a type of fruit syrup popular in the Middle East made from carob, dates, grape molasses and rose water. Jallab is very popular in Jordan, Syria, Palestine and Lebanon. It is made mainly of grape molasses, ...


24

N2O is more stable than CO2. Mixing N2O with water or cream won't create diffetent molecules. If the liquid you add N2O is not very thick (as water) the gas and liquid will separate in two. If it is thick, as with cream, the gas will get trapped in it. You can see the proccess with more detail in this question. CO2 reacts with water (H2O) making H2CO3 (...


20

Seltzer and carbonated water are the same thing. Club soda is slightly different. "Seltzer" comes from German: The term seltzer water is a genericized trademark that derives from the German town Selters, which is renowned for its mineral springs. Naturally carbonated water has been commercially bottled and shipped from this town since the 18th ...


20

This recipe is listed under the section for fermentation, together with beer, wine and mead. The section starts with the sentence "Wine, beer and traditional sodas all depend on yeast to ferment sugar into alcohol and generate carbonation". I don't know enough about the history of soda to know if early sodas were alcoholic. Or rather, I am quite sure that ...


15

There are lots of people who have a rather simplistic approach to nutrition and think that removing fat and calories makes you healthy. Then they go through recipes for things they want to eat, replace the sources of fat with something which doesn't have fat and doesn't make the result outright inedible, and declare their recipe a success. I think this is ...


14

The main function that soda adds in these recipes is as a flavored syrup that also has an acid. So make your own. Add your preferred sweetener to water with some form of acidulation (I prefer apple cider vinegar with pork) and a few spices and you will have something suitable to use.


12

I learned a recipe for a chicken dish from my mother. Her recipe also called for cola to create a sticky and caramelised sauce. She taught me, however, that the cola could be replaced with fruit juice. Her preference was a mix of pineapple, mango, and orange juice. Shops where I live call this juice mix "tropical fruit" juice. It stands to reason, though, ...


9

When carbonated root beer comes into contact with the ice cream, carbon dioxide bubbles are released. Likewise, the soda helps to free air bubbles trapped in the ice cream. The fat in the ice cream coats all these bubbles, protecting them and allowing them to expand to create the huge heads of foam you see on root beer floats. https://wonderopolis.org/...


6

More sodastream bottles is the best option if you are starting from a sodastream. The best other alternative is to act just like a really old-fashioned soda counter. Mix and store your syrups/flavors. Measure syrup into the glass. Add plain soda-water and mix. Thus, your sodastream bottle only ever has plain carbonated water in it, not a specific flavor.


6

tl;dr: Grapefruit oil is the most likely missing link. Squeeze some grapefruit peels into your mix, or pick up a "food-grade" or "therapy-grade" essential oil (for extremely sparing use). In the absence of more information, I'll go ahead and take a broad pass at this. As I mention in comments, more data will help us get closer. As a starting point, let'...


5

I agree with @SAJ14SAJ. What I would add is that yeast does not require sunlight in any way ... but as UV light can be harmful to microorganisms and might inhibit yeast growth I wouldn't brew it in direct sun. for bottling beer it is normally suggested to leave the correct amount (1 - 1 ½ inch) of headspace (air) at the top of the bottle for carbonation and ...


4

Bought a Dr Pepper (in a can) from the vending machine in the back. The date was Aug11/08 Still tastes great and it's Oct22, 2012 :D


4

What about something like Hansen's? It's available at the local store here in Nowheresville, MN population ~7k so it shouldn't be too hard to find.


4

The flavors in Coke are cinnamon, vanilla, and citrus. I personally taste cinnamon the most. Dr. Pepper has a lot of other spice and berry flavors, and is similar to root beer. You could try to recreate the cola taste by using apple cider vinegar and adding cinnamon, vanilla, and molasses.


3

I think I know what you mean, but is the ice cream "crispy" only on the surface? Unless your ice cream becomes crispy in its interior as well, (which I could not explain), I think it's simply as you speculate, the water in the soda is freezing into a crust of ice around the surface of the ice cream ball. This would explain why it is more noticeable when the ...


3

OK, this is dangerously close to a recipe request, but far enough away that I feel OK to answer. Use the rule of two. 2 cups of sugar 2 two oranges 2 limes 2 lemons Juice and zest the whole fruit. Strain and and fill to 1 gallon with water. Filter if you want it to be clear. Carbonate using whatever technique you normally use whether that's a ...


3

The whole quote is Cooking the leaves with soda can make them more poisonous by producing soluble oxalates I can't tell you if the claim as a whole is true. But if it is true for the leaves, it is true for the stems too. Rhubarb contains oxalic acid and its salts which are created by the acid reacting with different metal ions such as calcium and ...


3

There are many resources on the web for home brewing soda, which you may wish to google. Of your specific questions, the only one I was able to find a clear answer to is that the fermentation temperature should be on the order of 70-80 F / 21 - 27 C, per Home Brewing.Org. There is no mention in any of the articles I have seen of turning or shaking the ...


3

simple extraction, Grate or coarsely Grind Kola Nuts, Place in alcohol overnight strain and discard the nuts. and you should have a crude extract. it is likely to have a strong Musky flavour and should be used in trace amounts. There are more complicated methods of extracting Ie caffeine Extraction. Have fun.


3

There are several cola recipes on this site. Recipe 2.6 references a kola extract recipe from the following book: Food Flavourings, by Joseph Merory, AVI Publishing Company, 1960. I'd assume that the kola nuts are added as in pieces, similar to how they are consumed - Kola nuts are consumed by breaking them open and into pieces.


3

I have developed an intolerance to eggs and sought some advice from a vegan Indian family I know. They have always used soda in their cakes. Since they've never had a cake made with eggs they admitted they have no way to compare the cakes but they said it is spongy and not dry. For them it isn't a matter of simple nutrition but a cultural and religious diet.


2

Cake recipes that heavily use syrup (especially inverted syrup/honey due to its non-crystallizing, moisture-keeping properties) and can work well without eggs are not uncommon (several types of Gingerbread/Ontbijkoek/Syrup Cake...) Now soft drinks (not the diet type suggested in that recipe, oddly, unless it uses sugar alcohols) ARE (thin) syrups. ...


2

Here is a video with instructions. The principle is pretty simple, make an extract from the nuts and mix with water & sugar to taste and carbonate either with CO2 (for a soda) or by fermenting yeast (for a beer or ale). [Edit] If you treat the kola nuts the same as you would ginger root in order to create your extract you will get where you want to be. ...


2

If you want a stronger flavor, and more bite, add more ginger. I make a dark, spicy ginger beer. I do not use yeast, but rather force carbonate. I don't know the exact quantities of ingredients used, I just make to taste each time. Below is my ingredient list: Fresh grated ginger Peppercorns Molasses Cane sugar Fresh squeezed lemon (added after the ...


2

No, the sodastream caps are big enough to fit a standard bottle cap inside it entirely. Practically everything about the sodastream is made in a proprietary manner to make sure you use their products as intended and never interchange them with something else (and can only purchase replacement parts from them)


2

Nitrogen and probably N2O don't dissolve well in water so that wont work. CO2 dissolves well + forms a weak acid that converts back to CO2 as the CO2 is released from the water. That is why almost all bubbly drinks use CO2. There are some other gasses that would work (aka non toxic and dissolve well but they are too expensive. So N2O soda no... or not ...


2

I'm fairly sure that you should be able to get a "rebuild kit" with all the rubber parts (and perhaps a few others.) Due to the wonders of modern commerce, it's anybody's guess as to whether you might well be able to find a complete new siphon for less cost. If you have a second-hand store or frequent tag sales you can almost certainly find one barely used ...


2

Soda-like drinks have traditionally been made in the same way as beer, but with less fermentation to keep the alcohol content low. Without alcohol, (and with a bunch of protein and fat around from the yogurt) you run the risk of growing some botulism in your soda. Some traditional fermentation techniques carry risk of botulism, and any 'new' technique should ...


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