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41

Of course “appealing” is quite opinion-based, so let’s look at the problem in a slightly more neutral “how can I avoid the colors mixing when I blend the soup”. In short, you can’t. If you have a significant amount of green and red veggies, that is. One of the appeals and key features of a classic minestrone are the colorful ingredients that give you a ...


28

I wouldn't actually call a soup with thickened liquid "a stew", for me a stew is a cooked dish with very little liquid altogether, be it thick or thin. Because of this, I would suggest a very simple solution: pass your soup through a colander, catching the liquid. Then return as much liquid as you like to your vegetables, to get your stew. Keep the ...


28

Let's leave aside the question of what separates a soup from a stew (there's no real answer, only mostly arbitrary opinions - which seems to be a somewhat widely shared belief around here: https://cooking.stackexchange.com/a/20963/70120). It sounds to me like you have a dish with some liquid in it and you want to thicken it. There are a number of ways that ...


28

The Turquoise Room (at the La Posada Hotel in Winslow, Arizona) has a "signature soup", which is actually two soups ladled into a single bowl: a bright yellow corn soup, and a darker brown bean soup. While I kind of feel like this defeats the purpose of a minestrone (which, as far as I am concerned, is meant to show off the lovely vegetables), I ...


23

Fennel is a fairly delicate flavor. I can see how caramelized onion and tomato would easily over power it. The bulb actually provide the most delicate flavor of fennel. If you want a more pronounced flavor, I would suggest fennel seed. I would further suggest you toast them first. They can then be used whole, or, if you want an even stronger flavor, ...


21

There is a lot of flavor in parsley stems, as is true of most "soft" herbs. In my kitchen, if it is soft/palatable, I use it.


18

I've actually tried it. It didn't work very well for me, but it might work better for you. The problem is, cookers like the Instant Pot are designed for quick pressure cooking first and foremost. While they have a "slow cook" or "keep warm" setting, the heating element is still driven at high power, just at a lower duty cycle. Over time, ...


15

I agree with Sneftel's answer that the quality is likely to degrade over time due to contents settling and breaking down into stuff that doesn't taste good. But just to add a thought regarding safety: food that's kept above 140F should in theory be safe indefinitely (see my answer to related question here). However, I'd be concerned about the proposed idea ...


12

Most vegetables starts to lose their natural flavor when cooked too long, which could be the case for your fennel, and the flavor would be even harder to notice after pureeing with rich tomato-butter-onion. BBC Good Food recommends boiling whole funnel for 20 minutes, and boiling fennel wedges for 12 minute, both of which are way less compared to 45 minutes. ...


11

Your primary option if you want to add a thickener, you can use any hydrocolloid you wish. I will not list them here again, since it isn't necessary that every single question on thickeners on the site gets the full list. You can download Martin Lersch's free reference book, Texture: a hydrocolloid recipe book, and start experimenting. I can also not tell ...


9

The reason that your "drink" is thin, is that you are not removing the water and seeds from the Tomato. Peel them and take away the water and seeds before you put them in the blender. Go here https://www.deliaonline.com/cookery-school/techniques/how-to-skin-and-de-seed-tomatoes


9

Your "drink" sounds a lot like gazpacho. When making gazpacho, bread is often blended in, primarily to increase the viscosity...not necessarily "calorie thin", but an option. Olive oil is also emulsified into the mix, creating an enjoyable texture, and adding to the flavor.


9

Add a can of chickpeas to the soup/stew and include some of the liquid (Aquafaba) from the tin. The Aquafaba is an excellent thickener, even by itself.


6

You can mix it with mashed potatoes or with mashed pumpkin or butternut. You can overcook rice to the point that it becomes a mushy paste and use that as a thickener. You can even take stale bread pulse it a couple of times in the blender and then add it. Pea protein is another option. Can of peas, drain the liquid, mash the peas, use as thickener.


5

During the depression, they used to put a porous stone in the pot when they made soup. The stone would hold the flavor of the soup. Then, when soup ingredients were hard to find, they would boil water with the soup stone in it. Pulling the flavor from the stone into the water. My father who is 83 still has one. As kids, we would lick it and you can still ...


5

I sometimes use a sweet, mild paprika to redden tomato-based soups which have turned out too brown. It doesn't go with every flavour, of course, but it works very well to liven up the appearance.


4

I suggest adding flax meal. This is very high in fiber, but not very high in digestible carbohydrates. It won't take too much, so the surge in calories won't be so bad. You will have to measure it out. Unfortunately, the Omega oils in this have some calories. The option that better fits your criteria is psyllium husk powder; plenty of thickening and fiber, ...


4

Some other suggestions, appending the list given by Juhasz: Psyllum husks can be used as a thickener but they might not be easily available. They don't have any taste whatsoever. The upside is that they are mostly non-digestible fiber which should play nicely with your condition. The downside is that they have a slight laxative effect, so use with ...


4

I was really hoping that someone still in professional food service would answer this, but they haven't, so here's my list of rules based on memory from when I was: Soups that are no good for holding: Egg-drop soups and seafood soups are risky because of rapid spoilage Miso soup settles out Soups that are thickened with a butter or heavy cream emulsion; ...


3

To turn it into a stew I use a family recipe that starts out looking like soup: tomato juice, V8 juice, beef, carrots, celery, potatoes and let it cook. Near the end we add red wine and some tapioca beads. Not many beads or powder is needed and that brings it to a stew consistency in 15-30 minutes. Add some dumplings or rolls and done. I used to cook ...


3

Just to add a clearer answer to this question: in general, it is usually possible to partially cook a soup or stew one day and then finish it a day or two later. However, if one wishes to do so, there are some guidelines to keep in mind: Any perishable ingredients in the soup/stew should be thoroughly cooked, particularly things like raw meat, etc., which ...


2

Brown meat broth is a traditional recipe in Brazil, where bones and vegetables are roasted in the oven with some olive oil, before they are used in making the broth. This "caramelizing" effect turns the broth brown. In your case, and as observed in the comments above, when the brothgets "thicker", some pieces of vegetable and bones have ...


2

One alternative, instead of adding thickeners, would be to remove some water. As mentioned in Keith Ford's answer, you could remove some water manually by de-seeding the tomatoes. OTOH, there are various ways to systematically reduce the moisture of the smoothie itself: The old-school approach would be to reduce it in a pot on the stove. That is, keep it ...


2

Considering this in the context of the earlier "everlasting stew" discussion, it's worth noting that there are certain ingredients which must be cooked using sustained high temperature. One notable example is red kidney beans which contain a protein which must be denatured (by boiling for ten minutes or so) before they are safe to eat. The ...


2

I always equate "depth" with "time". The longer it simmers, the more depth it gains. Adding anything you mentioned at the end may punch up the flavour, but I'd consider it to be 'top end' rather than 'depth'. My first thought would be to drop it in a slow cooker & see how it is in 4-6 hours - with or without your added ingredients, ...


2

Adding to many other fine suggestions: Add (cooked, drained) beans or (cooked or dry) lentils. The small red lentils, in particular, do a great job of thickening a pot.


2

Yes, you can do it and it will work. In fact, there is a huge market for products doing exactly that. You may know them as "bouillon cubes" but they exist in versions other than cubes, such as powder or liquid. They are a combination of MSG and aromatics, usually also salt. They rarely use gelatin, since the gelatin is actually a side effect of ...


2

Seeing that there is also a list of gluten-free flours that you may want to experiment with.Comments by the OP mentions auto-immune disease which to me means gluten intolerance. You do get some gluten free flours that can be used as thickening agents Almond Flour Almond flour is one of the most common grain- and gluten-free flours. It’s made from ground, ...


2

Note: This is a suggested experiment, rather than a tried-and-tested solution From the comments, yeast and malt extracts were suggested. I'd go further and say both, as neither will replicate beer flavour alone. Both are rather variable. Some experimenting will be required. In case you go too far with either of them, I suggest you have spare ingredients on ...


1

Dilution is the solution to pollution. There is no way to cover that smoke flavor. But you can thin out the Mexican soup with some other bland soup and that might turn out good. You could use tomato soup, or cheese soup or really any soup with flavors you think might be complemented by the Mexican soup. I am thinking clam chowder with smoky Mexican soup ...


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