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18

I've actually tried it. It didn't work very well for me, but it might work better for you. The problem is, cookers like the Instant Pot are designed for quick pressure cooking first and foremost. While they have a "slow cook" or "keep warm" setting, the heating element is still driven at high power, just at a lower duty cycle. Over time, ...


15

I agree with Sneftel's answer that the quality is likely to degrade over time due to contents settling and breaking down into stuff that doesn't taste good. But just to add a thought regarding safety: food that's kept above 140F should in theory be safe indefinitely (see my answer to related question here). However, I'd be concerned about the proposed idea ...


13

I buy tubs of Knorr stock powder from restaurant supply stores here in the uk, it's a different product from their cubes, and has a very different flavor, there's also a paste. It may be worth having a look at those. Knorr is the brand I see in the bulk quantities you'd typically see in a restaurant kitchen that you can get retail, other brands are not sold ...


12

You could use a bouquet garni. https://www.wikihow.com/Make-Bouquet-Garni https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bouquet_garni The bouquet garni... is a bundle of herbs usually tied together with string and mainly used to prepare soup, stock, casseroles and various stews.The bouquet is cooked with the other ingredients, but is removed prior to consumption.....


11

Your primary option if you want to add a thickener, you can use any hydrocolloid you wish. I will not list them here again, since it isn't necessary that every single question on thickeners on the site gets the full list. You can download Martin Lersch's free reference book, Texture: a hydrocolloid recipe book, and start experimenting. I can also not tell ...


10

Other than balsamic vinegar and Chingkiang vinegar, all vinegars are reasonably substitutable for each other. White wine vinegar in particular will substitute well for sherry vinegar. (So will malt vinegar or cider vinegar or whatever you have lying around.)


9

The reason that your "drink" is thin, is that you are not removing the water and seeds from the Tomato. Peel them and take away the water and seeds before you put them in the blender. Go here https://www.deliaonline.com/cookery-school/techniques/how-to-skin-and-de-seed-tomatoes


9

Your "drink" sounds a lot like gazpacho. When making gazpacho, bread is often blended in, primarily to increase the viscosity...not necessarily "calorie thin", but an option. Olive oil is also emulsified into the mix, creating an enjoyable texture, and adding to the flavor.


7

They're mostly “wood”, so unless they're particularly dense (like peppercorns), they want to float on water. But their flavors will have been mostly extracted by that time, so they've done their job. A more viscous soup will slow their rise. A finer grind will improve wetting, and solvation by other molecules in the mixture, will slow aggregation and the ...


6

Both Knorr & Maggi have been going since forever. I really would expect it to be one or the other [Bisto & Oxo too, but for some reason I always think of them as being more of a home product]. I don't have flavour comparisons though for the catering-sized bouillon pastes compared to the domestic cubes, so this is a pure guess - but I can't imagine ...


5

I would go with red wine vinegar, and then white wine vinegar in that order. I am not sure whether red wine vinegar is readily available everywhere though.


4

I suggest adding flax meal. This is very high in fiber, but not very high in digestible carbohydrates. It won't take too much, so the surge in calories won't be so bad. You will have to measure it out. Unfortunately, the Omega oils in this have some calories. The option that better fits your criteria is psyllium husk powder; plenty of thickening and fiber, ...


3

Here are some options: Chill and scoop off solidified fat. Use a fat separator cup. Use a ladle to skim.


3

Just to add a clearer answer to this question: in general, it is usually possible to partially cook a soup or stew one day and then finish it a day or two later. However, if one wishes to do so, there are some guidelines to keep in mind: Any perishable ingredients in the soup/stew should be thoroughly cooked, particularly things like raw meat, etc., which ...


3

BOIL IN CHEESECLOTH, works great and I still strain liquid into cheesecloth AGAIN JUST to MAKE SURE there aren't bones or anything. Also REMEMBER to pick meat BEFORE BOILING for Stock. Or the meat has no flavor. Add meat AFTER the first round after carcass is taken out and remake with new meat and fresh veggies.....YUMMMMM


3

I don't see why not. I make channa masala from scratch - fry onions, garlic, chilli, add spices, drop soaked chickpeas ...and enough extra water so it will absorb and evaporate in the required time. That's your only bit of guesswork, but for soup that's probably not as crucial as for a dish which is served almost dry. What may be your sticking point - ...


2

You seem to be mixing up three things in your question: the total amount of fiber, the degree of mechanical change to the fiber, and the health effects of eating fiber which has been mechanically changed. For the first, the answer is clear cut: there is no change at all in the total amount of fiber. Blending is not a chemical reaction, it won't turn inulin ...


2

Hard to know what you're tasting, but most likely the bay leaf.


2

One alternative, instead of adding thickeners, would be to remove some water. As mentioned in Keith Ford's answer, you could remove some water manually by de-seeding the tomatoes. OTOH, there are various ways to systematically reduce the moisture of the smoothie itself: The old-school approach would be to reduce it in a pot on the stove. That is, keep it ...


2

You can chop it and eat it or add to your soup, stir fry, dry and crush into a powder to use as a condiment, etc.


2

Considering this in the context of the earlier "everlasting stew" discussion, it's worth noting that there are certain ingredients which must be cooked using sustained high temperature. One notable example is red kidney beans which contain a protein which must be denatured (by boiling for ten minutes or so) before they are safe to eat. The ...


2

I always equate "depth" with "time". The longer it simmers, the more depth it gains. Adding anything you mentioned at the end may punch up the flavour, but I'd consider it to be 'top end' rather than 'depth'. My first thought would be to drop it in a slow cooker & see how it is in 4-6 hours - with or without your added ingredients, ...


1

This is mere theory/guesswork, but I wonder if they might do it like a tadka [tarka] you add to dall [lentil] recipes? Fry garlic & other spices in oil, then pour over right at the end. Stirring in is optional, for presentation effect. Here's a link to a rather elaborate tadka method, including smoking charcoal which sounds fabulous, though I've never ...


1

This is normal. Chicken breasts are leaner than legs, thighs and wings, so they dry out faster. I often make a similar dish, but I use pre-cut pieces and dark meat for this very reason. 80 minutes sounds like a long time to me, you could probably reduce that and get a better result. You could also cut the breasts off and take them out early to avoid ...


1

If you're okay with the added acidity in a sauce, that would be fine, but for baking I would recommend looking for a recipe that calls for yogurt or buttermilk. As far as I know, coconut milk does not curdle like dairy or other nutmilks might in the presence of acid or heat. It might separate, but should re-emulsify well enough. However, baking usually ...


1

If you thaw your food in the fridge it is safe to add additional ingredients and re-freeze, but the quality will probably suffer. Don't thaw outside the fridge. You're better off freezing the new ingredients and combining them when you're ready to heat and serve them. Do your best to freeze as quickly as possible and with as little air in the containers as ...


1

Camouflage with tomatoes. Re the floral - could be the bay, or maybe store bought vegetable stock. If you have some that you did not use you could taste it and see. Sometimes store-bought stock has some weird off flavors. Re disguising it - I think tomato is a good flavor with ham / split pea or at least not a bad flavor. Try adding some tomato paste or ...


1

My preferred method is to use a thickener or emulsifier to bind the seasonings to the liquid and prevent them from moving freely. This also makes the soup feel more filling. Depending on what kind of flavor or texture you'd prefer, you can use finely chopped/shredded potatoes or carrots(any starchy vegetable will work), cornstarch or potato flakes, or some ...


1

roast the chicken first, then let it cool. This will make stripping the meat off the bones easy, and if you take the time give you a great amount of meat. then take the bones and boil them with an onion, a couple of carrots a stick of celery all roughly cut for 2hours or so. strain off the liquid into a crockpot and add your roasted chicken, and whatever veg ...


1

In Utah sometimes in elementary school teachers encourage students to bring stones for a soup. The teacher then shows the children how to identify what kinds they brought and adds all the stones that have a high mineral content. The result is a drink which is warm and tastes more like the water you get from the mountain springs and the teacher explains that ...


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