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This is mere theory/guesswork, but I wonder if they might do it like a tadka [tarka] you add to dall [lentil] recipes? Fry garlic & other spices in oil, then pour over right at the end. Stirring in is optional, for presentation effect. Here's a link to a rather elaborate tadka method, including smoking charcoal which sounds fabulous, though I've never ...


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Someone once told me that leaving a metal spoon in a metal pot containing food is bad because of electrolysis. I've searched for confirmation online but haven't found any.


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Considering this in the context of the earlier "everlasting stew" discussion, it's worth noting that there are certain ingredients which must be cooked using sustained high temperature. One notable example is red kidney beans which contain a protein which must be denatured (by boiling for ten minutes or so) before they are safe to eat. The ...


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I agree with Sneftel's answer that the quality is likely to degrade over time due to contents settling and breaking down into stuff that doesn't taste good. But just to add a thought regarding safety: food that's kept above 140F should in theory be safe indefinitely (see my answer to related question here). However, I'd be concerned about the proposed idea ...


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I've actually tried it. It didn't work very well for me, but it might work better for you. The problem is, cookers like the Instant Pot are designed for quick pressure cooking first and foremost. While they have a "slow cook" or "keep warm" setting, the heating element is still driven at high power, just at a lower duty cycle. Over time, ...


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Just to add a clearer answer to this question: in general, it is usually possible to partially cook a soup or stew one day and then finish it a day or two later. However, if one wishes to do so, there are some guidelines to keep in mind: Any perishable ingredients in the soup/stew should be thoroughly cooked, particularly things like raw meat, etc., which ...


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