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6

Eventually, yes... but it does have a fairly long shelf life. According to Eat by date, you should expect 1 to 2 weeks after the date on the package. They say: You can tell if sour cream has gone bad if you notice dark mold on its surface, bright bacterial marks, pockets of watery liquid and a sharp, bitter flavor. First the liquid will begin to ...


6

Depending on the specific application, you may (and probably will) get good results, but the flavor and texture will be may be slightly different when you substitute sour cream for unsweetened, unflavored yogurt. Consider that both of these products are fermented dairy. The main differences are going to be the level of fat (based on the specific dairy item ...


6

I'm not sure exactly what you're asking - whether you want brands of sour cream whose reduced-fat version is as tasty as the full-fat version, or if you want to substitute something else in place of sour cream. For the latter, it depends somewhat on what you're using it for. I find that in a lot of dips, substituting plain lowfat or fat-free yogurt works ...


6

It sounds like the sour cream was frozen and thawed.


6

If you can't find a reusable sour cream starter, you can use buttermilk starter. Some bloggers and biology/chemistry professors just use fresh active buttermilk as a starter rather than ordering some online. If you look at the various labels and product pages, you will find that both the buttermilk and sour cream starters contain the same four cultures: ...


6

No, creme fraiche needs specific cultures, which are not yogurt cultures, and lower fermentation temperature. If you use yogurt with Lactobacilicus Bulgaricus to innoculate your cream, and a standard yogurt process, you will get smetana (schmand). This is a dairy product with the same fat content as creme fraiche, but a different, sharper, flavor profile. ...


5

Years ago I worked for Daisy Brand Sour Cream, and during the tour of their facility, it was mentioned several times that they used the original method of making their sour cream that they've used for 100 years. I saw the cream loaded from the trucks and into various large containers for making the sour cream. Indeed, their web site seems to bear this out. ...


5

In a cookbook that old, the sour cream referenced is probably a home-fermented variety, used as a preservation method in the days before widespread home refrigeration. You can still do this with the appropriate bacterial cultures, but most of us now buy our sour cream at the store instead. That product is similar, but made in much larger batches with a ...


4

The difference is that they're two completely different ingredients and serve different purposes. Butter is 81 grams fat per 100 grams - or about 80% fat. Sour cream is only 20 grams fat per 100 grams - about 20%. In a quick bread like banana bread, recipes often call for fat in the form of oil, not butter, which is almost pure fat. Either way, these ...


4

Khatti malai or khatti makkani.


4

You can substitute one to one. Many brands of "light sour cream" (Which is an oxymoron. Cream without the cream?) have a lot of gums and starches to stabilize the liquid as the fat would have done. Brands that don't have gums dilute the fat with skim milk and are basically just yogurt anyway. Regular yogurt is fragile. It is a delicate mesh of proteins ...


4

I found definitions of sour cream and creme fraiche from the book The Chef's Companion: A Culinary Dictionary by Elizabeth Reilly. Sour Cream: cream commercially fermented with a lactic culture and usually 18 to 20 percent fat Creme Fraiche: French for heavy cream with a lactic culture introduced; the culture acts as a preservative and gives a ...


3

I'm wondering if mixing in some cream cheese in addition to, or in place of a portion of the sour cream, might help thicken things without altering the taste profile too much. Sour cream is roughly 73% water, while cream cheese is only around 53% water. That may be a way to reduce some of the water content without having to resort to heat.


3

This looks like it's most likely labneh, a form of yogurt that's strained to remove some of its moisture. The texture can range from a thick sour-cream consistency to something like dense cream cheese, and it's common in the cuisines of the Mediterranean and Levant. Sometimes it takes the form of rolled balls, sometimes it's served as a dip or sandwich ...


3

The answers can differ regionally. For Germany, it would be illegal to put anything but sour cream into a container labeled "sour cream", the Milcherzeugnisseverordnung is quite strict there (even prescribes mesophilic cultures). If there are parts of the world without this kind of legislation, you would have to somehow check it for each producer. Just ...


2

Cultured buttermilk + cream = creme fraiche, not sour cream. The two are related, but sour cream has a much more pronounced sour tang. You need the right culture to make the real sour cream, I am not sure whether it's available for home purchase (but feel that it must be, with all the local farmers and artisan cheese makers). I grew up with real sour cream, ...


2

You need more vinegar for it to thicken. I make salad dressing with cream as the oil and when I stir in the vinegar, it becomes quite thick. Unfortunately, it will probably have a strong vinegar taste in your recipe (which turns out to be okay in a salad dressing).


2

From this discussion it appears to be a way of differentiating it from Russian-style sour cream or smetana. Maybe it came about during the Cold War and it couldn't be sold as "American-Style" so they called it Canadian-Style... or maybe it's just a marketing ploy.


2

It depends on how commercial or industrial the sour cream is made. Most commercial/industrial sour cream starts from milk derivative products (powders...) and bacterial culture (and other stuff) Like this : https://beatrice.ca/en/quebec/portfolio-item/3-14-250-ml/ Some better commercial sour cream, only uses cream and bacterial culture. Like this: ...


2

First things first: If you're trying to precisely replicate the flavor, you'll probably fail. Food scientists put an incredible amount of time, money and effort into developing those flavors and have ingredients and equipment that we don't have access to. Often, the flavors themselves are byproducts of industrial processing, and they've been combined in a ...


2

I think I would go with double cream. It's really thick once whipped (careful not to split it by overwhipping it). Then fold gently your sour cream and condensed milk mixed together into it, preferably with a maryse. You could also add some gelatine if that's not an issue for you.


1

There is quite a big difference in the process of making dahi vs yoghurt (aside from pasteurisation), as yogurt is made with bacteria (called yogurt cultures) and curd is made by curdling milk with an acidic agent (like lemon juice). I would personally use full-fat greek yogurt and add a little fresh lemon juice to the yogurt for a quick-fix. You could, ...


1

I would try adding some softened cream cheese to your dip mixture. Most creamy dips are made up of one or more of sour cream, mayonnaise, and cream cheese. Also, you could try caramelizing the white parts of green onions (or just any old white/yellow onion) for a deeper flavor, and then stirring in the green parts, minced. Don't forget salt (and maybe some ...


1

Is sour cream and curd different food, or the same? Is it really from middle-eastern cuisine, or just some restaurants that think it is, when it isn't? And if it is, what is the correct name of it? Curds are the product of of milk that has been coagulated. It is basically the same process that makes your blood turn into scabs when we bleed. When acids ...


1

I realize this question was asked a million years ago, but Canadian style sour cream refers to sour cream that has different texture from that of a standard american sour cream, as well as a bit different taste. Canadian style sour cream is usually creamier and if you were to remove some sour cream with a spoon from the tub, you don't have a definite ...


1

Judy's guess is one good possibility. The other possibility is that it was curdled by something. As sour cream is quite stable and rarely curdles even if too old, it could have happened through heating. Still, going bad cannot be ruled out (because it is also a cause for curdling). But it might also have been benign.


1

Never tried US-made sour cream and never tasted anything like you described, but here in Russia when the sour cream goes bad, it smells either rancid, rotten, or moldy (depending on circumstances of going bad). 10 days after canning is close (for cheaper brands) to or (better) past its expiry date. Perhaps what you have is from a bad batch: not fermented ...


1

Yes. Foods are specially designed for sale. Soured cream has been artificially soured for sale. After that is just goes off. It is like blue cheese, the 'blue' is artificially injected into the cheese. You could personally scrape off the mould but it is not the sort of thing you can/should serve to someone else.


1

The vinegar works on the protein in the cream to make it thick. It may be that the UHT Thickened Cream is lower in protein and fat and already thickened with chemicals (Xanthan gum, guar gum, glycol, etc). If you can't find real cream with 30% or more fat, you may have to add gelling agents such as xanthan gum to get it thicker. It wouldn't be my ...


1

Not sure about the health factors of this but I used to use evaporated milk (the canned stuff you can mix with water 50/50). 1 cup of evaporated milk, 1 tablespoon vinegar and let it sit until it thickens, allways start with both at room temp and keep them there, it kind of clots up on its own, refrigerating may be what kept your method thin.


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