23

If it has mold on it then it needs to be thrown away, you are unlikely to salvage it. Once a sourdough starter goes wrong it's generally not worth your time to try and save it, just start over.


17

Sure, you can begin a new sour dough starter with the discard from a feeding. However, the reason for discarding isn't simply to reduce the amount. As your starter matures it also becomes much more acidic. Acidity is problematic for yeast and bacterial activity and, ultimately, the rise and flavor of your final product. So, you discard during feeding time ...


15

Absolutely you can. When you use the starter to make bread you make an arbitrary decision of which part of the starter you use and which to feed, the part you scoop out is just as viable as the part you keep. When you discard some instead of using it the same rule applies, so all you need to do is put some in a container and feed it the same way. You can ...


12

Absent a definitive answer here, I'm going to take a stab at this based on some experience I had with difficult sourdough starters. Note that I make a lot of sourdough items but do not do any kind of multi-stage prefeeding ritual. Sourdough is a culture of multiple types of bacteria and wild yeast. Sometimes wild yeasts do not reproduce rapidly or produce ...


10

That is referred to as "hooch". It is water and alcohol. It forms when the yeast has passed its peak activity. I've noticed that it corresponds with the increase of bacterial activity when the starter gets more sour. The hooch will not form when you are feeding regularly. It is harmless and can be discarded or mixed back in. Sourdough is a balancing act. ...


9

This is a theoretical answer based on several publications and it would require actual experimental tests. The most probable tip seems to maintain your sourdough at 32 °C as it will affect facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli present in your sourdough. A lot of spread knowledge provides, without explanation, several tips such as: feed your starter ...


9

Treat it like any liquid. You don't need much. Just put some in a 100 ml plastic bottle if carrying on. Alternately, if checking your bags, put your starter in a larger plastic container with a screw cap...like a Nalgene bottle, for example. You can build it back up once you get to your destination.


9

If you don't want to transport liquid (= active) sourdough because you don't want to risk it to spill out of your container, note that you can either mix some of it with more flour than usual until you get a dryish crumbly mass that can be stored in a plastic box or bag or spread a thin layer on parchment and dry it. Break up the "sheet" and store it in a ...


7

This question involves a lot of sub-questions that don't have simple answers, so this response is a bit long. From my experience producing dozens of starters from scratch over the years, I have to disagree with some of the details given in the other answer. There are two goals in the early days of a starter: Produce an environment hospitable to the ...


7

While I have successfully begun a starter with only 10 grams of flour at the outset, I think I agree with Stephie that doing a little more is more efficient. I used to do very wasteful starters until I happened upon this site back in 2002 or something. (Amazingly, it's still there.) You can read the details there, but basically the guy who did it designed ...


7

FuzzyChef is correct that one reason for a multistage approach is to ensure the starter is operating "at full strength" before mixing the final dough. (And it's also important to note the imbalance of bacteria and yeast mentioned in that answer.) A lot of people don't bake bread reliably every week, and reviving a starter that's been in the fridge for ...


7

I've just been dealing with a similar issue. My sourdough starter wasn't producing sour enough bread. In my case Russian black bread which is also rye. It was rising well but tasted like regular bread. I did a some research and experimentation and fixed it. I'm sure you are aware that a sourdough starter has both yeast and bacteria. The yeast consume sugar ...


7

As others have said, if it's mouldy throw it out and start again. These hints might help you be more successful next time: thoroughly clean and sanitise the jar and all the implements (spoons etc) before use by boiling. Wash your hands before you start making the starter and before feeding feed every day (as you have), and stir well. The starter needs ...


7

Don't do this. A sourdough starter contains several strains of yeast and bacteria in a fairly delicate balance. These consume sugars and produce CO2 and a range of byproducts. Commercial yeast is a different species of yeast, engineered to eat and reproduce much faster than any of the wild yeasts in your starter. Adding commercial yeast to a starter will ...


6

You aren't going to be able to get a sourdough starter from flour to ready-to-bake in 24 hours. You could easily make a poolish or pâte fermentée in that time, and get some of the flavor. You might also be able to use some yogurt whey or another source of lactic acid to get some of the sour flavor. Unfortunately, a sour starter is something that you kind of ...


6

No, you cannot. Kefir grains are a unique Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast (SCOBY). Kefir grains are a gelatinous mass of microorganisms including Lactobacilli, Leuconostic, Acetobacter, and Saccharomyces. By looks, it is more like Ginger Beer Plant than sourdough starter. It is not possible to create kefir grains from scratch. You will have to buy a ...


6

Unfortunately many kinds of fermentation produce CO2 as a byproduct, so the presence of bubbles hardly give you more information than 'it is alive'. If what you want is a precise identification of what strain of yeast and bacteria are present in your starter, I see no easier way than looking under a microscope or making a laboratory analysis. If you just ...


6

Then feed it again In my experience, any issues with sourdough, up to and including a surface layer of fungus, formaldehyde smell, and rotten dirty socks smell, can be fixed by simply feeding it. The worse the sourdough's condition is, the longer you have to feed it; if you don't have any of the above mentioned issues, two days consistent feeding should be ...


6

Yes, a sourdough starter can be made from AP flour. Rye and other whole grain flours are recommended because they can generally be built up more quickly, given the higher level of nutrients available to yeasts and bacteria, but I've been able to make the process work with AP flour. It is fairly likely that you will need at least some whole grain flour if ...


6

What you've got there is a mix of precipitated proteins from the wort (the "trub") mixed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae spores, and also various compounds from the hops. It's on the bottom of the beer because you're making an ale; only lagers have the yeast floating on the top, and then only during active fermentation. Taste a bit. Then drink something to ...


5

(1) Feeding your starter more often than once a day is usually counterproductive. If you do not give the microorganisms plenty of time between feedings to grow and reproduce you will just end up wasting a lot of time and flour. One of the crucial steps for sourdough yeasts to be happy and reproduce with limited competition is the acidification of the ...


5

Three things: Most traditional Neapolitan pizza dough does not use a pre-ferment - poolish, biga, or sourdough starter. Not to say it may not be good, but it wouldn't the way most are made. Sourdough starters change their flavor profiles by age and by geographical region. In general, I would expect a bit more of a 'tang' from the sourdough starter than ...


5

The vibrations will have an effect: On you, because it will be harder to judge the "ripeness" of your refreshed sourdough. You often want to catch the point "just before its starts to go down again" - which will be hard to do when the shaking machine bursts the bubbles all the time. I doubt that the yeasts and bacteria in the starter will mind - they won'...


5

I won't say your idea doesn't work, but there are a few points to consider: A "ripe" sourdough contains a balanced culture of yeast and bacteria (lactobacillus) that can keep fungi and other unwelcome bacteria under control. Let me use the political landscape of today's US as an example: You have two big parties in slightly varying majorities - like in a ...


5

As a point of reference let's look to this "Sourdough Starter Recipe" Combine ¾ cup flour and ½ cup warm water in a glass or plastic container. Make sure the container can hold about 2 quarts, to avoid overflow. Stir vigorously to incorporate air; cover with a breathable lid. Leave in a warm place, 70-85°F (21-29°C) for 12-24 hours. Feeding every 12 ...


5

Your question should be broken down in two parts: How long does it take to get a starter going? How to schedule my sourdough feeding to fit my schedule? For 1., if you have no starter to build on, you won’t be able to get a reliable one ready within three days. Sorry. The time until a new starter establishes, stabilizes and gets usable is at minimum four ...


5

Your starter should have no problem working with other flours, you don't need to acclimatize it or anything. Just use it as you ordinarily would. I would suggest bread flour rather than AP, the higher gluten content will give better structure.


5

Gray discoloration is normal and nothing to worry about. If you see orange or pink then your starter should be thrown away.


5

It depends on the temperature of your room, but you may still have enough left alive to save it. Is it still bubbling at all? You should throw most of it away and feed it and see if it changes and bubbles in the next few hours. I'd try keeping just a few tablespoons (maybe 100g of the starter, throwing the rest away) and add 500g of flour and 500g of 75°F ...


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