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17

Sure, you can begin a new sour dough starter with the discard from a feeding. However, the reason for discarding isn't simply to reduce the amount. As your starter matures it also becomes much more acidic. Acidity is problematic for yeast and bacterial activity and, ultimately, the rise and flavor of your final product. So, you discard during feeding time ...


15

Absolutely you can. When you use the starter to make bread you make an arbitrary decision of which part of the starter you use and which to feed, the part you scoop out is just as viable as the part you keep. When you discard some instead of using it the same rule applies, so all you need to do is put some in a container and feed it the same way. You can ...


11

Absent a definitive answer here, I'm going to take a stab at this based on some experience I had with difficult sourdough starters. Note that I make a lot of sourdough items but do not do any kind of multi-stage prefeeding ritual. Sourdough is a culture of multiple types of bacteria and wild yeast. Sometimes wild yeasts do not reproduce rapidly or produce ...


9

This is a theoretical answer based on several publications and it would require actual experimental tests. The most probable tip seems to maintain your sourdough at 32 °C as it will affect facultatively heterofermentative lactobacilli present in your sourdough. A lot of spread knowledge provides, without explanation, several tips such as: feed your starter ...


9

Treat it like any liquid. You don't need much. Just put some in a 100 ml plastic bottle if carrying on. Alternately, if checking your bags, put your starter in a larger plastic container with a screw cap...like a Nalgene bottle, for example. You can build it back up once you get to your destination.


9

If you don't want to transport liquid (= active) sourdough because you don't want to risk it to spill out of your container, note that you can either mix some of it with more flour than usual until you get a dryish crumbly mass that can be stored in a plastic box or bag or spread a thin layer on parchment and dry it. Break up the "sheet" and store it in a ...


7

I've just been dealing with a similar issue. My sourdough starter wasn't producing sour enough bread. In my case Russian black bread which is also rye. It was rising well but tasted like regular bread. I did a some research and experimentation and fixed it. I'm sure you are aware that a sourdough starter has both yeast and bacteria. The yeast consume sugar ...


6

You aren't going to be able to get a sourdough starter from flour to ready-to-bake in 24 hours. You could easily make a poolish or pâte fermentée in that time, and get some of the flavor. You might also be able to use some yogurt whey or another source of lactic acid to get some of the sour flavor. Unfortunately, a sour starter is something that you kind of ...


6

While I have successfully begun a starter with only 10 grams of flour at the outset, I think I agree with Stephie that doing a little more is more efficient. I used to do very wasteful starters until I happened upon this site back in 2002 or something. (Amazingly, it's still there.) You can read the details there, but basically the guy who did it designed ...


6

This question involves a lot of sub-questions that don't have simple answers, so this response is a bit long. From my experience producing dozens of starters from scratch over the years, I have to disagree with some of the details given in the other answer. There are two goals in the early days of a starter: Produce an environment hospitable to the ...


6

No, you cannot. Kefir grains are a unique Symbiotic Culture of Bacteria and Yeast (SCOBY). Kefir grains are a gelatinous mass of microorganisms including Lactobacilli, Leuconostic, Acetobacter, and Saccharomyces. By looks, it is more like Ginger Beer Plant than sourdough starter. It is not possible to create kefir grains from scratch. You will have to buy a ...


6

FuzzyChef is correct that one reason for a multistage approach is to ensure the starter is operating "at full strength" before mixing the final dough. (And it's also important to note the imbalance of bacteria and yeast mentioned in that answer.) A lot of people don't bake bread reliably every week, and reviving a starter that's been in the fridge for ...


6

Unfortunately many kinds of fermentation produce CO2 as a byproduct, so the presence of bubbles hardly give you more information than 'it is alive'. If what you want is a precise identification of what strain of yeast and bacteria are present in your starter, I see no easier way than looking under a microscope or making a laboratory analysis. If you just ...


5

The vibrations will have an effect: On you, because it will be harder to judge the "ripeness" of your refreshed sourdough. You often want to catch the point "just before its starts to go down again" - which will be hard to do when the shaking machine bursts the bubbles all the time. I doubt that the yeasts and bacteria in the starter will mind - they won'...


5

(1) Feeding your starter more often than once a day is usually counterproductive. If you do not give the microorganisms plenty of time between feedings to grow and reproduce you will just end up wasting a lot of time and flour. One of the crucial steps for sourdough yeasts to be happy and reproduce with limited competition is the acidification of the ...


5

Three things: Most traditional Neapolitan pizza dough does not use a pre-ferment - poolish, biga, or sourdough starter. Not to say it may not be good, but it wouldn't the way most are made. Sourdough starters change their flavor profiles by age and by geographical region. In general, I would expect a bit more of a 'tang' from the sourdough starter than ...


5

As a point of reference let's look to this "Sourdough Starter Recipe" Combine ¾ cup flour and ½ cup warm water in a glass or plastic container. Make sure the container can hold about 2 quarts, to avoid overflow. Stir vigorously to incorporate air; cover with a breathable lid. Leave in a warm place, 70-85°F (21-29°C) for 12-24 hours. Feeding every 12 ...


5

Your question should be broken down in two parts: How long does it take to get a starter going? How to schedule my sourdough feeding to fit my schedule? For 1., if you have no starter to build on, you won’t be able to get a reliable one ready within three days. Sorry. The time until a new starter establishes, stabilizes and gets usable is at minimum four ...


4

I won't say your idea doesn't work, but there are a few points to consider: A "ripe" sourdough contains a balanced culture of yeast and bacteria (lactobacillus) that can keep fungi and other unwelcome bacteria under control. Let me use the political landscape of today's US as an example: You have two big parties in slightly varying majorities - like in a ...


4

Since a starter is actually a symbiotic mixture of microorganisms, factors like hydration level can change the balance of bacteria and yeasts. Depending on which organisms are favored, it can change the flavor, gas production, etc. They're not necessarily "benefits", but different consistencies can definitely produce different starters. The biggest and most ...


4

I would suggest you to keep feeding the starter a few more days before starting the 'discard and feed'. Fermentation is a process that requires a LOT of patience, as everything else in baking. On the other hand I tried and could successfully make a starter following these instructions. I love The Kitchn and Emma Christensen. Her baking tutorials are among ...


4

Disguise it as cookie - the airport does not generally take your food items unless they are forbidden when entering or leaving the Country. Mix a small amount (10g) of your starter with about 3-4 times the amount of unbleached or whole grain flour. Once you can no longer incorporate the flour press it flat to form a cookie - you can even add raisins to the ...


3

The easiest method, and most common in a commercial setting, would be to add a small amount of yeast in addition to the sourdough starter. You will probably have to reformulate a bit, as the dough will mature faster leaving the starter less time to develop flavor. This is usually overcome by also increasing the proportion of starter (and adjusting the final ...


3

Thought I'd chime in here. I was in a similar spot a few months ago. I came across Jeff Varasanos website, http://www.varasanos.com/PizzaRecipe.htm. I read his entire page (it's long) then bought and read the recommended book, "Classic Sourdoughs" by Ed Wood. I then bought and activated these cultures: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B006TMLF98/ref=...


3

Well every yeast strain is a bit different but normally the range is fairly forgiving. Speaking from homebrew side; killing yeast from cold is almost impossible. Homebrew side; they make electric thermostat controlled blankets to control temperatures; if you are going repeat this a couple times might be worth investment. In beer world; changing the yeast ...


3

Sourdough during the first few days can show pretty erratic behavior. I wouldn’t worry, just stir and feed as planned. Continuing the culture with just the foamy top would probably also work. Reasons to start over would be visible mold (fluffy or colorful spots) or if there’s no bubbling. Neither is the case here.


3

Nothing that happens in a starter in the first few days is normal, in the sense that it doesn't behave like a mature starter. During this time, the bacterial flora in the starter is in constant flux, and you need to wait until the desired bacteria have prevailed, which will take some time. It is not impossible to do something wrong, but you will only know ...


3

My early sourdough loaves looked like that. Now they are less flat and have defined hikes through the crumb rather than a great interlinked cavern. The things that changed: my starter became more mature and stable. It lives in the fridge and gets fed 2-3 times a week when I bake. I keep about 250g which gets 100g taken out and replaced for my standard loaf ...


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