159

Surely the authors of the previous (sublime!) answers will throw the "Sure it works in practice, but does it work in theory!?" at me, but this great SE question and its answers still lured me into creating an answer backed up by empirical evidence. The Answer YES! It's certainly possible. At least one successful attempt has been logged (see below). The ...


22

I'm afraid you have gotten something wrong. Sous-vide and pressure cooking are, as far as food physics is concerned, on the opposite ends of the scale. Pressure cooking allows you to increase the boiling point of water, thus reducing the cooking time. (Bad idea for a tender steak, btw., as soon as you exceed a certain temperature, the proteins in the meat ...


20

Pull them out on time. Cool them rapidly in an ice bath. The rapid cooling is for food safety reasons rather than any affect on the cooking. Reheat them for cooking however you were going to finish them originally. I wouldn't leave them cooking for 48 hours. I think you run the risk of affecting the texture of the meat negatively. If you're planning on ...


18

It would not caramelize for sure, as caramelization occurs between 110 and 180 degrees celsius depending on the particular sugar - well over the boiling point of water, which is your maximum sous-vide temperature. However, it would serve a few purposes that might well work. For one, it would allow the slow breakdown of starches into sugars, just as other ...


18

The reduction of bacterial growth, and thus food safety, follow a logarithmic pattern that factors in temperature plus time. During sous vide cooking, lower temperature are frequently used for longer times. Employed correctly, this renders food safe. For an excellent explanation see the work of Douglas Baldwin.


17

All information that gives safe cooking temperatures without reference to time at that temperature is wrong. The FDA guidelines, and state and local health dept. guidelines not only confict with each other, they are flat out wrong! They all represent efforts to simplify molecular biology to two or three mindless rules. In the process, they guarantee that ...


16

For your steaks, 5 minutes of searing seems like a pretty long time, easily enough to go from medium-rare to medium, or even more than that, depending on thickness and exactly how hot the pan is. It's definitely normal for the meat to be gray before the sear, so if your pan was indeed as hot as you can get it and you needed the whole 5 minutes to get the ...


15

No, that doesn't sound good. The circulating water is what transfers heat efficiently to everything, making sure the water is the same temperature everywhere. If the flow is obstructed that can't happen. And if the food isn't all surrounded by water that's held at the desired temperature, it won't get heated as desired.


14

No, those bags are not completely sealed. They are designed to let steam escape, therefore they are not watertight, if you put them in your sous vide machine they'd get waterlogged.


13

Yep, Ziploc bags are fine although make sure you have ones that are appropriately heat sensitive for whatever temperatures you'll be cooking at. There's a good guide on the Cooking Issues blog: http://www.cookingissues.com/primers/sous-vide/part-ii-low-temperature-cooking-without-a-vacuum/#sectionII3b1 Fill a container with water deep enough to easily ...


12

This article may be a good starting place for some advice. They consider a lot of the common microbes, not just Salmonella. Assuming you get somewhere close to the 140F range for an extended period of time, you'll kill off most things. Other things might only survive in spore form, so you might be okay eating the food while it's hot. But care should be ...


12

According to Amazing Ribs: 130-140°F - Fats begin to melt and render (liquefy). This is a slow process and can take hours. Note: this is 55-60 C. The speed of the process will increase with temperature.


12

Modernist Cuisine, Vol 1, p122 (includes my bold): A separate family of parasitic worms, known as nematodes or anisakids, includes species such as Anisakis simplex and Pseudoterranova decipiens (which is also listed under the genus Terranova or Phocanema). These worms follow a life cycle that resembles that of trichinae but in a marine environment. ...


12

130F (approx. 54C) works great. That brings it to the very bottom of the "medium-rare scale", allowing you to sear before presentation without overcooking. Although, I have to tell you, filet mignon is kind of a waste with sous vide. Not that it won't be great, but a much less expensive cut can be cooked at that temperature much longer and give you ...


11

Anything you salt will firm up in texture over a period of time. I suspect that since you cooked these with seasonings and then chilled and left them in the fridge before reheating an eating they firmed up a great deal in the fridge. If you check out this blind tasting conducted by Dave Arnold at Cooking Issues you'll find some more detailed info about ...


11

I would say no. Carmelization requires high heat. Sous Vide is the opposite of that - low, slow heat. Here's some info on it from Science of Cooking. Caramelization or caramelisation (see spelling differences) is the oxidation of sugar, a process used extensively in cooking for the resulting nutty flavor and brown color. Caramelization is a type of non-...


10

I'm sorry that you're having problems with my book. I think the problem is that you're adding water to the pouch. In the recipe, step 4 asks you to: Vacuum-seal the broccoli, butter, and a pinch of salt and pepper in a large pouch so that the florets are in a single layer. This will crush the tops a bit, but it will be much easier to seal. Sorry again....


10

Pretty simple, cook the two steaks separately at the required temperatures the day before. Cool in an ice bath and reserve in the fridge. The next day rethermalise the steaks in the bath at say 55C: you really only need to heat them for around 25-30 minutes, as all you want to do is take the chill out of the steaks before you sear them on as a high a heat as ...


10

You're finding a range of answers because there is a range of answers. Medium rare is not a precisely defined term. Asking for a temperature down to the degree for is kind of like asking how much a pinch of salt should weigh, to the tenth of a gram. Even if you assume everyone agrees on a single definition, it'll still be a range. We have just a handful of ...


10

Sous vide is simply a tool. It's not the correct one for every job. Rendering fat is generally a problem because of the low temperatures used. What was the final result you had in mind? If you want "traditional" ribs, then the best way to cook them is traditionally. Google will reveal multiple sources, try Chefsteps and Serious Eats for starters.


9

You cooked it at too low a temperature. Sous vide is intended for meat where you want the protein to remain tender. It shouldn't have any sinews. Think chicken breasts, or the long filet along the spine of a pig. This meat gets nicely cooked at 60-65°C (depends on the animal), and tough and dry above that. Meat marbled with sinews has to be cooked at a ...


9

What you need for the conversion of collagen is a certain amount of energy. It is a complicated process - the melting point is around 70°C for the type of collagen contained in beef, but the melting does not happen instantly once the meat reaches 70°C. In a pressure cooking, you can apply the same amount of energy in a shorter amount of time. This is not bad,...


9

Your set-up is fine. You'll probably eventually want to trade in the stock-pot for something like this: But there is no reason that the set-up you have shouldn't make great salmon. I have exactly that set-up (including the stock-pot for now, but the square polypolycarbonate container is on order). 125F for one hour is pretty close to bare minimum time and ...


9

Pasteurization is the process of heating food to kill pathogenic bacteria, rendering it safe to eat. Pasteurization is a function of temperature and time. Using sous vide, one could easily have a pasteurized rare steak, or even a "raw" egg. So, yes...pasteurized food is able to be consumed more safely by people who are immunocompromised or pregnant. These ...


9

Basic food safety dictates that you always start with a clean product, no matter what you are using or how you are cooking it. For your eggs, simply rinse with clean water, or place in a bowl of water. A soft cloth or gentle brush could be used to remove dirt.


8

Water has one of the highest heat capacities available: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heat_capacity#Table_of_specific_heat_capacities Your ceramic is not going to hold nearly as much heat as the water bath itself. If you are finding that your bath is cooling too quickly then you are better off investigating your cooler.


8

Yes. You can safely sous vide meat for more than four hours. However, it's pretty dependent on the temperature, size, and type of meat that you're cooking if it will work or if you'd even want to. When cooking sous vide, you're either pasteurizing or not pasteurizing your meat. If you pasteurize the meat, then the 4 hour limit wouldn't really matter. It's ...


8

Yes you can. Some of the best sous-vide I've had has been in a crock-pot. You'll need a crock-pot with a manual (analogue) dial. What you do is set the dial to maximum and use a PID controller (found ~$20 on ebay). Take a look at this article about hacking your slow cooker: http://www.cookingforgeeks.com/blog/posts/diy-sous-vide/ Update: Sous-vide by ...


8

Assuming it says 100% for the potatoes, I don't think you've got the scaling right. The recipe format picks a baseline ingredient, then gives the quantities for other ingredients as percentages of that ingredient. So if it says potatoes 100%, water 200%, then for 1kg of potatoes you need 2kg (2L) of water. See the detailed explanation from the source. The ...


8

Two things cause bags to fill with air during low temp cooking. The expansion of air that already exists in a product (typical in vegetable cookery), and gas that results in bacterial growth (a problem with some cuts of meat). For vegetable cookery weighting helps, but this is almost always an issue unless you compress a really hard vacuum with a ...


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