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I don't have any experience with cooking heads, but the problem sounds familiar enough. The quality of meat in restaurants is often far better than what you can buy at a regular consumer market. What you - a regular layperson - buy as a "lambs head" might actually be an old rams head. What a restaurant chef buys is fresh meat from suppliers the chef trusts ...


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The low, constant temperature balanced the hydrolysis of collagen into gelatin with keeping the other meat proteins from over coagulating. Based on a cursory search on the internet, hydrolysis of collagen into gelatin begins at roughly 140°F, although it really gets going at 160°-180°F. Had the cook left the brisket in for longer, it probably would have ...


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I think it's fine to transport, and not even worry about the temperature or time. Kept in a sealed bag, your ribs have already been pasteurized and new microbes cannot enter. This is similar to confit, which was common prior to widespread refrigeration. Quoting Wikipedia, "After...cooking in the fat, sealed and stored in a cool, dark place, confit can last ...


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While sous vide does mean "under vacuum," much of the cooking is done in plastic zip lock bags with no vacuum, but with the air squeezed out. The critical element is precise temperature control that you achieve with an immersion circulator. You could certainly cook this way by dumping your vegetables or meat right into the water itself. The problem is that ...


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