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4

No, you can't do that. The inside of the carton is not cardboard, it is covered with a thin layer of a paraffin-like substance. If you hear the carton to 82 Celsius, you will melt the paraffin into the milk. There are methods where you heat and ferment in the same container, but I don't like them. With traditional heating, you end up with a layer of milk ...


-1

A big problem with traditional fatty meats such as brisket, pork butt, or such is that Sous Vide temperatures don't get the meat hot enough to render the fat. Lean meats are hard to get tender because of the lack of fat, so Sous Vide is better for lean meat. I would argue that for things like Brisket and Pork Butt that low and slow without using Sous Vide ...


0

Lean meat is harder to cook correctly. If overcooked, it gets tough and dry, whereas fatty meat can take more abuse. I can't count how many overcooked porterhouses I've had where the strip side was decent but the tenderloin was dry. That won't happen with sous vide, and it's much harder to overcook something underwater compared to using fire. Sous vide will ...


0

When cooking a steak sous vide to medium rare you're cooking at a fairly constant temperature around 129-135 Fahrenheit. This temperature isn't enough to render fat quickly so a lot of people might complain about 'rubbery' fat, especially if it's a cut with a nice chunk of fat on the side. You also won't get a good sear with sous vide only. So I'd recommend ...


0

Better cannot be answered as its opinion based, the question is do you like fat? What you have to remember with sous vide is that nothing in that sealed packet is going anywhere. If you roast or grill a piece of meat fat will drip off, if you sous vide it will all remain in the packet. Some of the fat will come out into the liquid surrounding it, but it will ...


0

As sous vide is sealed the salt isn't going to go anywhere but the food, so if you don't want an overall salty flavor then I wouldn't add salt to the sous vide. Maybe a very small sprinkle to give it a hint, but no more. It's probably worth experimenting by cutting up a steak into 3 or 4 pieces and sous viding them with varying amounts of salt to see what ...


2

Consider this: when you salt a protein, it draws out water. However, water is not the only thing that leaves the meat. To put it another way, prepare two different bags and add salt to one but not the other. If we successfully control the other variables, the result will be that the salted bag has more liquid in it. Even if we recapture that liquid (the “...


4

Ahh, a long-debated question in low-temp cooking circles. Dave Arnold, an early low-temp (sous vide) cooking instructor, ran a test when he was an instructor at (what was then know as) the French Culinary Institute in NYC. The three variables were (a) salted - cook - chill, (b) unsalted - cook - chill, and (c) salted - direct serve. His testers preferred ...


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