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I originally voted this question as a duplicate. However, the OP is correct in that the proposed duplicate does not address the specific case of sous vide. Here, I attempt to help in that regard. The definitive source for the answer to your question is Douglas Baldwin. From the information you've supplied, it is difficult to make any safety claims. ...


2

Normally it's recommended to keep cooked meat for less than a week in the fridge. But since this was vacuum sealed (less Fat Oxidation and Rancidity) and cooked again at 63c for over an hour (killing bacteria and molds, most of which are harmless but unpleasant, and would be noticable) I'd say it's safe to eat. It might have developed some off-flavors or ...


3

Theoretically, there is no problem with your logic. In fact, during the early days of restaurant sous vide adoption, when chefs were using the same immersion circulators that scientists were using, it was not uncommon to poach fish directly in oil using an immersion circulator. Those original tools could handle that job. However, most home sous vide devices ...


4

I use sous vide as a tool in the kitchen on a regular basis. Over the years I've developed some preferences and recognize that as a tool, there are some jobs it does well, and other jobs where traditional cooking methods simply produce a better result. For me, I prefer fish cooked using traditional methods, and I would use the stove, oven, or grill before I ...


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