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20

Still tasty implicitly says that the sauce stays indefinitely technically edible. The expiration date is only for quality purposes. I think the sauce probably doesn't have an expiration date but rather a "Best By" or "Best if Used By" date. Storage time shown is for best quality only — after that, the sauce's texture, color or flavor may change, but in ...


10

Soy sauce, sake or mirin and sugar are the usual ingredients in a teriyaki sauce. The rice wines in particular are vital for an authentic teriyaki flavour. So the question is somewhat moot: onions aren't usually found in teriyaki sauce anyway. The onions naturally add flavour to your marinade: if you like it, leave them in, if you don't, take them out. The ...


8

Assuming TVP is what you used... it is essentially a byproduct of the production of tofu, and as such is largely tasteless on its own. Generally, to use it you first rehydrate it with a 1:1-1.5 ratio of TVP to liquid. The liquid can be pretty much anything, from water, to broth, mustard, ketchup, liquid smoke, etc. Very similar to tofu, it will absorb the ...


8

Well, this is what Kikkoman has to say about it: Kikkoman Less Sodium Soy Sauce is brewed exactly the same way as all-purpose Kikkoman Soy Sauce. However, after the fermentation process is completed, approximately 40% of the salt is removed. Although there is less sodium in Less Sodium Soy Sauce, all the flavor and quality characteristics remain because ...


8

Your typical Tamari is, to my understanding, going to be closer to dark than light soy sauce. So you'd want light as a second soy sauce. Inside Japan, there are five kinds of soy sauce: Koikuchi, which is your most typical soy sauce Usukuchi, which is lighter because it has fermented rice in it Tamari, which has more soy than wheat and thus is a bit ...


7

Soy sauce is pretty salty. It sounds like a great deal of water diffused out of your chicken and into the marinade, which significantly changed the texture of the meat. It's not uncommon to do something like this on purpose. When you make gravlax, for example, you cover a piece of salmon with quite a bit of salt and refrigerate it for a day or two. The salt ...


7

No, you can not. Milk is used as a liquid in cakes. Eggs add a little bit of liquid, but also have lots of other effects on your batter. You don't want these effects, or rather, you want them to happen in a certain degree, and the ratio of eggs to milk in existing recipes is calculated to give you the optimal degree. The effects are too many to explain in ...


7

I know I am joining the conversation late, but I wanted to share my experience with making soy milk in two different ways. First method tried: soak, blend, strain, boil. This method produced a milk with a strong soy flavor but also a LOT of okara (perhaps my blender is wimpy?). Another time, I soaked the beans in a crock pot, and then, just out of habit ...


7

I can get soy beans in two varieties here: As dried beans and as edamame. Edamame is a particular type of soybean that is harvested when it is still young. The pods are cooked (usually boiled or steamed) and then served with salt. The beans are popped from the pod and eaten. The pod is discarded. Edamame is sweet and a little grassy because it is young. ...


7

It depends. Are you talking tamari, shoyu or western soy sauce? Good tamari will improve with age (which is why I buy it in 5gal quantities even though I use far less than a gal/year). The same is probably true of shoyu as well, but westeren soy sauce has additional ingredients which may affect shelf life.


6

You need to consider the role of the oils in the dish. The soy oil is almost certainly used for its frying properties (to help prevent sticking, and more efficiently transmit heat from the pan to the food). For this function, you can use any vegetable oil or shortening for frying, based on your dietary preferences and your relative's sensitivities. ...


6

If you hate the soy burgers, you will probably hate meatloaf made from them. Your best bet might be to defrost 1 or 2 burgers and mix them with ground beef (or whatever meat you use for meatloaf) with no more than 25% of the mix being the soy burgers. If you like your first meatloaf, you can always try a little bit higher percentage of the soy burgers next ...


6

Doesn't seem like it to me. I have a bottle in my cupboard from 1997 and it's still fine on the (very) rare occasion when I actually put any on my rice.


6

One possible reason is that Tempeh is uniquely from Indonesia, which is much less of a culinary influence on the US than China, Japan, and Korea - all of which use tofu in traditional dishes. There were an estimated 95,000 Indonesian immigrants in 2010, where Eastern Asian immigrants was over 3.9 million in 2014. sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...


6

No, you can't cook dried beans just by roasting them. All this would do is it dry them out even more and that wouldn't make them more edible. Indeed, dried beans are used as baking beans to weigh down pastry during blind baking and they don't pop like popcorn. All recipes for roasted soybeans require some combination of soaking and/or boiling before they ...


5

You are asking about the difference between the traditional Japanese and Chinese methods of soy milk preparation. In the Chinese, the beans are soaked, ground, strained, and the milk is boiled. In the Japanese, the beans are soaked, ground, boiled, and then strained. I have tried both ways. The Japanese method extracts more from the beans but they tend ...


5

I have never heard of Tofu being called "vegetable meat". There are some fake meat types based on different types of soya products (or also other plant proteins), like "fake duck". But the only product I have seen bearing the generic label "vegetable meat" is textured vegetable protein. It is made from soya beans whose fat has been extracted to be used for ...


5

They were literally thrown away, physically removed from the whole. The basic steps of making tofu are: Make soy milk out of the soy beans. The residue after straining the milk, called okara, is not used in the tofu. It contains lots of carbohydrates, especially insoluble fibre. Curdle the soy milk with epsom salt. Separate the curds from the whey and ...


5

Soy milk can spoil, just like ordinary cow's milk. That seems to be what happened. While spoilage in cow's milk is usually souring, and the smell is unmistakable at fifty paces, soy milk spoils by turning gooey. I'm not sure about the details, but it's something in how the proteins react to oxygen. In soy milk, if I'm not mistaken, they turn into longer, ...


4

Tamari is a byproduct of making misu. It is the real deal. Shoyu is a tamari imitation made by altering the misu process to increase liquid production without hurting flavor. (It almost succeeds. not bad but not quite as good as the real thing.) Soy sauce could be either of these mixed with other fillers to increase production volume or yet another product ...


4

I have been experimenting with making soymilk since I need a lot of it for my bakery. I want to go more cruelty free, so eliminating dairy would be a huge step in that direction. I found that soaking, straining and then boiling made a huge mess bc the soymilk really foams up and boils over the pot. I found that bringing it to a boil using very low heat ...


4

It is basically as simple as you say (soak, blend, strain) ... just that you should also boil it (for long enough - cca. 10 minutes) to get rid of the fresh bean (grassy) flavor (mainly caused by oxidation of polyunsaturated oils in the beans), together with some other unpleasant side effects of eating uncooked beans (like the infamous gas-producing effect ...


4

There are actually products that are Soy Free Soy Sauce. You can also find recipes to make your own. This Recipe for Soy Free Soy Sauce Substitute has great reviews and sounds pretty good. It is made with bouillon, molasses, balsamic vinegar and seasonings. A lot of people swear by Bragg Liquid Aminos as a soy free soy sauce alternative, but it actually ...


4

According to this Lipoxygenase is a crucial enzyme to deactivate. And in this paper they use 60°C for 30 minutes after soaking the beans. But the pH may also be important. For normal water pH is around 7.


4

Pretty much all the commercial soy sauces, after fermenting is done, press the mash, and the final step is to pasteurize the sauce. This not only kills mold and bacteria, it also alters the flavor in a favorable way, as well. Cook's Illustrated: Brewing a Better Soy Sauce For both safety and for a better homemade product, I'd recommend heating it, though I ...


4

Yes, any bean can be fermented. Black bean is common, for example, but you can certainly experiment. This site might be a good starting point. They recommend rehydration, then cooking, prior to fermentation. They recommend using yogurt, a commercial starter culture, or a brine from lacto-fermented vegetables to get the process going.


3

There is a site called Go Dairy Free.org that uses whole-fat coconut milk in its poundcake recipe. There seems to be lots of recipes that are suitable for your purposes. Best of luck!


3

The order of the preparation steps for soy milk do make a difference, but primarily in the ease and convenience of the process. By fully pre-cooking the beans then freezing them, you can make small batches of soy milk daily and you don't need to filter the end product if you use a high powered blender. This works well for morning grain cereal, recipes and ...


3

Are you talking about Tofu? It is often used to make imitation meats (example: Tofurkey), and is made from soy. It's perfectly hygienic, popular around the world, and no more artificial than most other mass-produced foods -- it can be entirely organic, but is not always. It's not one of those new laboratory-produced chemicals, it's just soybeans processed ...


3

By "cream" do you mean "milk?" If you are lactose intolerant, I suggest some margarine and either sour cream or yogurt. If you have a lactose allergy, still margarine, more alternate dairy products, and some kind of spice mix, like an Italian seasoning.


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