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9

Its been a while but I found this thread as I was wondering the same thing... Not much info on raw okara but I just googled raw soybeans.... "For human consumption, soybeans must be cooked with "wet" heat to destroy the trypsin inhibitors (serine protease inhibitors). Raw soybeans, including the immature green form, are toxic to humans, swine, chickens, and ...


9

The beany flavor is destroyed by heat. Some recipes do call for boiling the beans before grinding as you said. Most recipes that I have seen call for boiling the milk for a while after it has been strained. I find this more convenient as the milk is strained and pressed cold and then heated. If your milk is still excessively beany then you may not be ...


9

East Asian soy milk and American soy milk taste very different, and not just because of added ingredients like sugar and emulsifiers. Soy beans contain an enzyme called lipoxidase, which breaks down unsaturated fatty acids into shorter chain lipids. For American markets, manufacturers presoak the beans in solvents such as calcium hydroxide in order to ...


8

Most of the popular soy milk in the US is sweetened, thickened and flavored. It's also may have ingredients added as stabilizers, preservatives, the usual. East Asian style soy milk is simply the result of grinding mature soy beans (usually dry ones that have been soaked in water) and water and then straining the result. The differences would be pretty ...


7

Soy milk is bitter. Enzymes in the beans (lipoxygenase) combine with fats in the presence of water to produce what is usually described as a "beany flavor"; bitter and grassy. The solution to this problem, although not done in many traditional soy milk preparations, is to cook the soy milk long enough to destroy the enzyme. Many, but not all, soy milk ...


7

I know I am joining the conversation late, but I wanted to share my experience with making soy milk in two different ways. First method tried: soak, blend, strain, boil. This method produced a milk with a strong soy flavor but also a LOT of okara (perhaps my blender is wimpy?). Another time, I soaked the beans in a crock pot, and then, just out of habit ...


6

Glad you asked this - I had the same question a couple weeks ago when making homemade soy milk with a new SoyaBella maker I got. This article from the VeganYumYum provided some good information. Here's a summary of things to try. Always soak beans in boiling water, then rinse the beans off thoroughly before making your soy milk. This is probably the most ...


6

I have an old SoyaQuick (mine has a filter, newer models don't), and I think it was largely a cleaning concern. The tiny perforations in the filter clogged very easily, and the instruction manual had a whole section of bizarre tips for cleaning it (soak it in bleach! squeeze a soapy sponge to one side to force the suds through!) There's also some marketing ...


5

You are asking about the difference between the traditional Japanese and Chinese methods of soy milk preparation. In the Chinese, the beans are soaked, ground, strained, and the milk is boiled. In the Japanese, the beans are soaked, ground, boiled, and then strained. I have tried both ways. The Japanese method extracts more from the beans but they tend ...


5

The fizzing is a warning sign: There is unwanted life in your mayonnaise. The fizz indicates microbes - bacteria and/or yeasts - growing in your bottles. The fizz is likely CO2, a byproduct of their digestive activities. Any food with signs of unplanned and unknown fermentation processes is not safe and should be discarded. You don’t mention any “...


4

I know Soyafarm, a Japanese company, invented a process that reduces the grassy aroma of soybeans in soymilk, soy yogurt and other soy protein products. I believe the process is enzymatic, but I haven't read the literature; there is some patent information that the parent company and some related companies have filed; many of the techniques would be hard to ...


4

Boil the soybeans when they are raw (10 minutes), then soak them (10 hours, refreshing water every 2 hours), then dry them (10 hours), then boil them with baking soda (1 teaspoon per 10 cups of water), then rinse, blend with water, and boil mixture for 30 minutes, then cool, filter through muslin, and refrigerate. Done.


4

I have been experimenting with making soymilk since I need a lot of it for my bakery. I want to go more cruelty free, so eliminating dairy would be a huge step in that direction. I found that soaking, straining and then boiling made a huge mess bc the soymilk really foams up and boils over the pot. I found that bringing it to a boil using very low heat ...


4

It is basically as simple as you say (soak, blend, strain) ... just that you should also boil it (for long enough - cca. 10 minutes) to get rid of the fresh bean (grassy) flavor (mainly caused by oxidation of polyunsaturated oils in the beans), together with some other unpleasant side effects of eating uncooked beans (like the infamous gas-producing effect ...


4

According to this Lipoxygenase is a crucial enzyme to deactivate. And in this paper they use 60°C for 30 minutes after soaking the beans. But the pH may also be important. For normal water pH is around 7.


3

What do the dates mean? On their website FAQs, the Silk manufacturer describe the date on their package: Our refrigerated beverages and creamers will stay fresh in your refrigerator until the date stamped on the carton. Once opened, they need to be consumed within 7 to 10 days. It is not unusual for our products to remain good past the 10-day mark; ...


3

The order of the preparation steps for soy milk do make a difference, but primarily in the ease and convenience of the process. By fully pre-cooking the beans then freezing them, you can make small batches of soy milk daily and you don't need to filter the end product if you use a high powered blender. This works well for morning grain cereal, recipes and ...


3

Browning depends a lot on available sugar: if soya was unsweetened and skim milk was now used (higher lactose than 3%), I could see quicker browning.


3

I will disagree with Johanna here. While hers sounds like a reasonable definition, it is not how the word is used in practice. Milk is A) Cow's (also goat's, sheep's, camel's and mare's) lactated fluid, or B) Any liquid which kinda looks like A), doesn't have an overly strong taste, and there is a convention of being called a milk. It can in many cases ...


3

Agar is a gelling agent and will not work as a coagulant. Give epsom salts a try. I have not experienced the graininess that you suggest.


3

This will give you a soymilk jelly, which might or might not make a good component for desserts, but that is a distinct preparation from tofu, which works by coagulating the proteins in the soymilk itself instead of leaving the soymilk intact and incorporating it in a jelly.


3

I make my own soymilk regularly. The method I use is from Yoshiko Takeuchi's book Cooking with Soy. She explains that traditional Chinese soymilk is made by grinding the beans with cold water, while the Japanese method involves heating the beans to reduce the strong bean flavour. "Western" style soymilk, she says, is made using a process that includes ...


2

You won't be adding any ascorbic acid or such -would curdle the milk- but an oil based vitamin such as found inside a vitamin E gel-cap would mix in fine. Would only be as absorbable or bio-available as the original vitamin product. The idea of fortifying soya comes from the notion that we get a large amount of our nutrients from cows milk and without it, ...


2

I can't find any definitive answers to this question online. All the discussion I could find are speculation. Factors that cause soy protein to coagulate are heat, acidity, and the presence of magnesium or calcium salts. Additionally the proteins are more likely to curdle if they are heated very quickly. I will assume that you heated your coffee and milk ...


2

I've tried many processes for making soy milk and... These days, for my day to day routine,I use the "cook whole then blend method", because, at the end, it takes me less time for making a huge amount of milk (I blend 1 cup of cooked beans for 3 to 4 cup of water). I freeze the beans by the cup and I blend it directly in the mason jar. But if I want to ...


2

As noted in "History of Tofu and Tofu Products", alkaline earth metals (such as calcium and magnesium) in solution cause the proteins in soy milk to curdle. As I discovered by searching for "Magnesium in table salt" and "Calcium in table salt", a cup of salt contains about 3 mg of magnesium and 70 mg of calclum. While those concentrations aren't high enough ...


2

Expiration dates on milk are not intended for open containers. Any open milk is only good for 3-5 days. After that, it is not safe for drinking, and taste is not guaranteed either. Many people seem to not know that. Traditionally, you could only buy HTST pasteurized milk, which has 7-10 days of usable time altogether. It spent 2-3 days on its way to the ...


2

What I noticed, is that I'm invariably allergic to all soy milk based products produced in Western countries (I live in Europe), whatever the brand, but that I have no allergy to soy bean based Asian products (Soy sauce, tofu, fresh soy beans, soy milk of Asian origin). I'm also allergic to vegetable milk made with almonds or rice. There must be a ...


2

This is the procedure passed down to me thro my mom. Let's say we are using two quarts of beans. Ensuring the purity of texture and taste. Compulsively ensure the beans are as clean as possible from impurities. Such compulsion is especially necessary if you wish to coagulate the soy milk into soy custard. We need the texture of the milk or custard to be ...


2

It will not have the same texture or taste as tofu which may be acceptable to you. It is very much a jelly/jello as pointed out by others. The biggest difference is that you will not be able to cook this gel-based tofu. For cold use, it would be fine. Agar will soften and melt when heated, melting point is concentration and acidity dependent but always well ...


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