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3

For a curry I would usually fry in oil as per @moscafj's answer. Another option is to toast them dry on a pan, then cool them and either crack them in a mortar and pestle or grind them into powder. I would do this when if I wanted the mustard as a finishing spice at the end of cooking as adding the whole seed at the end wouldn't give them time to cook.


10

I take the term "loose" to mean spices sold from large containers, scooped into a bag, rather than a sealed and packaged off-the-shelf product. A sealed container, produced commercially, is (presumably) inspected and regulated to avoid adulteration. When you buy from an open container at a market or store, you have no way to know if it was mixed with ...


6

Typical in Indian cuisine, and I am sure it would work in other preparations, the first step is to heat some ghee or oil and then add brown mustard seed. Now, these will pop, so it is helpful to use a lid on the pan. Once the seeds are finished popping, the lid can be removed and you can continue with additional spices and/or other ingredients. Just be ...


9

The one I use is Aji-Shio-Kosho. It is a blend of salt, black pepper, and MSG. Here is a link to the specific one I buy on Amazon. A quick internet search may provide you with more results.


37

They may have been trying to describe "salt and Japanese pepper". Japanese pepper is unrelated to black pepper, but closely related to Sichuan pepper; its flavor has been described as "lemony" and it has a "numbing" quality. It's also known as "sansho". Mixtures of pre-ground sansho and salt are readily available in Asian grocery stores. This mixture is ...


2

Where is it? According to Wikipedia, "Cumin seeds have eight ridges with oil canals." I'd suspect these canals to be the "home" of the essential oils (= volatile, fragrance/flavor giving oils). Apparently the whole cumin seed contains oil which the ground version doesn't. Total oil content of cumin seeds is ≈ 15 %, but the volatile essential oils are ...


3

(if I read the question properly) " I would like it to mix with my cooking oil." If you want cumin flavored oil, you can simply steep the cumin seed in a neutral flavored oil. You will have to experiment for quantities and steep times. I'd crush some seeds, put them in a pan and add some oil (whatever quantity, start small) and slightly heat the oil and ...


3

I'm not exactly clear about what you are asking. Technically speaking, they are not all spices. Paprika and ancho are dried and ground peppers (though you can certainly get whole ancho). When cooked they will rehydrate somewhat and the flavor will become more integrated into the dish. Oregano is an herb. It will not fade, or go bitter, as much as black ...


4

Paprika and ancho chillies are both from the same family as the hotter peppers and often contain capsaicin, though this depends exactly on which paprika you have. Cumin and oregano (and black pepper) are all from other families. I would not rate cumin or oregano as spicy in terms of heat, although cumin can enhance heat when consumed with it. Oregano is ...


1

When you grind any material you are intentionally rubbing one surface against another, causing the grinding surfaces to wear. So yes, when you grind pepper (or coffee, spices, etc) very small parts of the grinder material will come off as you do it, and that's true whether the material is plastic or metal. The difference in how much of the grinder ends up ...


2

If you go small enough, you're always inhaling/ingesting something foreign. Your concern, although logically valid, is nearly impossible to regulate or even measure. We're talking about amount that is, literally, microscopic. You're definitely eating it, but discussion of the consequences (if any) is off topic on the site. The environmental concerns are ...


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