23

This step is not about food safety, it's about consistency and in fact about three properties of your jam: Jam comes in a wide variation of consistencies, one parameter is "stiffness", another "water content" and a third "smoothness". In baking, you want smooth (no lumps) jam that is speadable enough to form a thin layer (especially if used as a "glue"), ...


16

You are asking for a firm definition where none exists. Baking is not mathematics, and it does not have a heap of literature where everybody has formally agreed to use the same terminology. Thus classification of baking goods is done into intuitive categories. This means it doesn't work by strictly defining where the border of a category lies (everything ...


12

As an English person who moved to the USA as an adult. I thought I might give my side of what I have seen here to explain the difference in wording. Firstly I would highly recommend reading the Wikipedia article on this as it includes a discussion of why "pound cakes" and other similar cakes are considered sponge cake in the UK but "foam cakes" are in fact ...


8

The key to this cake is the whisking of the eggs and sugar to the ribbon stage. This incorporates a significant amount of air into the batter. You didn't mention it, but I imagine the flour is then folded in. The cake will work mechanically. However, I cannot imagine it will taste very good: there is no salt to enhance flavor, no fat (other than from ...


8

You want the dry ingredients to be fully moistened and dispersed throughout the liquid with no dry clumps. You also want minimal agitation so that you don't destroy the retrained air, introduced by the whipped egg whites, which acts to give a fluffier texture to the finished cake. If you sprinkle the dry ingredients over the batter in multiple steps and ...


7

It really depends on the density of the bottom sponge. If it's too light, you might have a problem. To be doubly sure, take some wide straws (the ones about 1cm across) stick them in the bottom layer, then snip them flush. These will act like columns to support the top cake.


7

Yes, it is bad. Most baking powder will begin to produce co2 as soon it gets wet. If you let the batter rest before putting it in the oven, your cake will thus lose some of airiness.


6

I suggest looking for a recipe without almonds rather than substituting a major ingredient. If you can't find one without almonds, you may have to track down a similar cake recipe under a different name. I'm sure it would be possible to find another ground nut that would work, but it would take some experimenting because the texture and water/fat content ...


6

I can't say why you'd want to do this in general for other types of sponge cakes. But in the linked recipe it's very clear. The reason is because the milk/butter mixture is heated "to just under a boil" and according to the instructions should still be at least "hot (about 150F)" when added. In this case, you take out a small portion of the batter, then ...


6

It will most likely turn out fine. Cream of tarter is sometimes added when beating egg whites to enhance the stability of the foam that you form. The egg whites beat into peaks on their own, but the cream of tarter is an accelerator of this process and also a bit of a preservative of the structure when you're folding in the rest of the batter. A bit of an "...


6

@rumtscho has a great answer for what a sponge cake actually, technically is, but I don't think they've answered your underlying question. As I understand it, "sponge" is British-English (slang?) for any kind of cake, whether the cake in question is technically a sponge cake or not. I've also watched a lot of Bake Off, and you rarely even hear them use ...


5

Will it end up being a (probably delicious) cake? Yes. Will it have the texture of a Victoria sponge? No. The melted chocolate will destroy some of the airiness of the sponge, making it more like a brownie. Instead, I would recommend substituting a few tablespoons of flour for unsweetened cocoa powder. That will give you a chocolate Victoria sponge.


5

It would be really unusual for a single layer of cake to collapse the cake below in a way that would make it unusable for a two-year-old's party. You are not making a 13 layer wedding cake. You are not putting dense fruitcake on top of angel food cake. Sure, you can put straws in it, but then you'll have to deal with them while you're serving the cake. I ...


5

Many sponge cake forms are made with removable bottoms and tabs that stick up on the sides. The purpose of the removable bottom is obvious, run a knife around the side and push the cake out. However, the tabs allow for a marvoulous technique when cooling your sponge cake. When your cake is done cooking and ready to let cool, you invert it without running ...


4

Drinking chocolate is a bad way to flavor a cake. It consists of cocoa powder mixed with sugar, and has nowhere near enough chocolate taste. The correct way to flavor a cake is either baking chocolate (the real thing, not "fat-containing cocoa glaze"), or cocoa powder. You should choose the one to use depending on the recipe; don't just add it to a normal ...


4

I have no trouble making lovely light lemon cake gluten free, and many other gluten free cakes too, I make them for a living. There is a substitute for gluten and it's called Xanthan Gum. You can buy this separately to add to your flour (about a teaspoonful for every 250g), or in a ready mixed flour blend, at least you can in the UK. A mixture of flours ...


4

If you are sure that your oven can turn the microwaves completely off, then use it like any other toaster oven. Turn the microwaves off so only the heat elements are on, turn to the temperature you need, let it "bake" for 10 minutes without anything inside. It is preheated. Bake the cake as usual. Be aware that, if the heating elements are on top only, you ...


4

Generally speaking, a sponge cake recipe needs to create and trap a bubble structure in a mixture of protein, sugar, and starch. Since there are a number of ways to do this, there are a number of common techniques used for accomplishing that goal. The techniques are different and interactions between ingredients can be more complicated than they seem, so the ...


4

Seeing your recipe would be helpful here. Older sponge cake recipes rely only on beaten eggs for leavening. Newer recipes use chemical leaveners as well. Common reasons for sponge cakes not rising (or not staying risen) are: Not beating the eggs long enough Even with the addition of chemical leavening, getting enough air into the eggs in advance is ...


3

A basic sponge does not contain milk, yoghurt or other dairy, neither does his closely related cousin, the pound cake (except for butter, of course). That said, obviously there are many recipes that use extra ingredients like dairy products. Usually the percentages of the recipes are a bit different from the "base" recipes. There are a few reasons to add ...


3

Sure, no problem. Just make sure the balance is right and the top cake isn't too heavy. A little "glue" (frosting for example) between them might help them stick together.


3

I suspect that the purpose of the double boiler is to bring the eggs up to room temperature, which isn't going to make that much of a difference. Most recipes would say that the process will take 10 minutes, but you may be able to speed things up marginally: Use a bowl that concentrates the eggs in as small an area as possible so your beater blades contact ...


3

This is a cake that my mom made all the time. The key is to use a light hand when mixing the flour and to really make sure to beat the eggs well. The result is almost like an angel food cake, but with more depth. it won't be moist like the butter laden cakes, but closer to a sponge cake. The absence of salt and vanilla is not noticeable. It lends itself well ...


3

Well if I were to attempt this I'd try to use jello for the flavor and the color. Realistically though, the icing and ice cream on the cake are the real flavor aspects. Lids don't care that you slaved over the oven; put ice cream on anything and they are happy. After separating the white cake mix into four seperate bowls, add a teaspoon or so of the jello ...


3

Orange and lemon cakes are classics, so there shouldn't be any problem making those layers. I'm not entirely sure how you'd go about making the others, but there should be a way to incorporate fruit puree into cake batter so that the cakes still rise and set. Blueberry, blackberry and raspberry can all be added whole or slightly chopped into a cake (think ...


3

I have never added butter to sponge sheets when making swiss rolls, jelly rolls, or anything similar in the past. It's just straight up bread flour, sugar, and eggs. I can only think of three possible reasons why butter might be added: To improve the flavour; To keep the sheets moist and help prevent overbaking, as any fat would be used in cake batter; ...


3

For doubling a recipe, yes, you double the amount of baking powder. Issues with increasing a recipe rarely cause trouble until you get to 4x or more. For baking though, you do want to make sure the depth of the cake is the same as for the original recipe though so that it bakes properly in about the same amount of time. This recipe from Bon Appetit is ...


3

Different types of cakes are recognizable by their ratios. Recognizing the ratio of your recipe is very hard, because it is given in nonstandard volumetric measurements. In fact, the use of "flour" (without differentiation of the type) together with cornstarch, and the formulation "heaped tablespoon" suggests that this is a continental European recipe, where ...


3

Try using the actual recipe without substitutions or additions. I've not made this type of cake, so I cannot answer with 100% certainty. However, in general I would recommend not tinkering with ingredients the first time you make a recipe, especially when baking. There are structural reasons for a lot of baking ingredients, and messing with them is a ...


2

Eggs being left out is, of course, bad but the risk of egg contamination is very low, sugar is a preservative, the batter is being baked and 2 hours isn't long anyway. Unless your room temperature is 85F or the batter sat out for 6 hours I wouldn't worry about it at all.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible