Hot answers tagged

26

No, as far as I know pasta made with squid ink, often called nero di seppia, should be stable, and the ink doesn't normally bleed into the water. From my experience after boiling black pasta, even the fresh kind, the water comes out clear like with regular one, with just a bit of clear starch being left behind. If you boil regular and black pasta mixed ...


7

Based on the article SAJ14SAJ linked to in the comments, in the only known case in which this happened with cooked squid, it was parboiled, and almost certainly not fully cooked: "the whole squid spent just a few seconds in boiling water". If the squid is cooked, then the spermatophore will be inactive, and nothing bad is going to happen. (Living things tend ...


6

Squid gets rubbery when overcooked and it happens really fast, so you should just blanch it for just a few seconds and immediately cool it in icy water. I used to score the squid on the outside (with a criss-cross pattern, not too deep) to prevent it from warping during the cooking process. It also adds a nice texture.


5

Papaya is a known tenderizer for octopus, squid, and other meats. Another option is papaya enzyme tablets found in the supplement section of drugstore. Either can be added to the recipe while marinating or cooking. The tablets have the advantage of imparting no flavor. I can't judge the amount without a recipe, but pretty hard to go wrong. Also squid and ...


5

I have cooked squid ink pasta, and did not find much bleeding. On the other hand, i’ve had SIP in a restaurant, and everything was stained black. So perhaps there’s some other variable at play.


3

As is usually the case with food safety, it is not purely the time something is cooking, but the temperature. Most recipes, even for fresh squid, call for a very short boil in water. If, out of an abundance of caution, you wanted to make absolutely sure that your squid is cooked safely, the CDC mandates that the internal temperature of seafood should reach ...


3

In Africa they tenderize them by beating them with rocks, like you would do with a steak tenderizer. A bit of manual labour, but well worth the effort. The by far most tender calamare I've ever had was in Namibia, and that was beaten before cooking.


2

marinating over-nite helps to keep it tender. Ive also seen people dipping squids in hot water for couple seconds then taking it out and repeating it for few times to keep it tender before actually cooking it.


2

I agree that a long braise would be one way to go but I also use large squid to make one of my favorite chowders, faux conch chowder. I use my meat grinder attachment for my KA stand mixer to grind the squid, tentacles and bodies, and then combine them with chopped clams in a traditional Caribbean conch chowder broth. I find that the ground squid mimics ...


2

Those are meant to eat with rice, though you can it on your own. They aren't really salted, they were steamed with some salt, then frozen.


2

The recipe in the video appears to cook the squid entirely, then mix it into the rest of the dish, then continue to cook the entire dish. (I suspect the recipe's creator has different expectations regarding the final texture of cooked squid) Overcooked squid will be tough or rubbery whenever over cooked, whether too hot, too long, or both (which will happen ...


2

Boiling it in ink will give some flavor and color, but it won't be part of the pasta. Instead, you could make a squid ink-based sauce to toss it in afterwards. Here's an example recipe: https://www.thespruceeats.com/spaghetti-al-nero-di-seppia-2018653


1

If your squid is pre-frozen you don't have to worry; these parasites die when frozen. And most of the squid you buy will be pre-frozen.


1

It is entirely possible to reheat calamari without thawing first, I would suggest boiling for one to two minutes, depending on piece size, longer if you are using larger pieces. Conversely you can cover the calamari with boiling water and let it sit for a little bit longer than one to two minutes, I would also suggest that you heat thoroughly, better safe ...


1

Just killed squid is white, but while death processes continue after defrosting internal organs and inner skin get reddish. It's still possible to eat it even for sashimi though it will be not tasty enough but absolutely fine for cooking. At least this is according some japanese Q&A sites like this one http://oshiete.goo.ne.jp/qa/4199049.html Most of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible