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I would go further than the other answers and even say that it is the opposite of your understanding: The terms "non-stick pan" and "stainless steel pan" are mostly mutually exclusive in their usage. That is, when a cook speaks of a stainless steel pan, or a product description is titled as a stainless steel pan, this is usually taken to ...


28

A non-stick coating is a specific chemical applied to the surface which makes it very hard for food to stick. When people refer to a 'stainless steel pan', that does not imply that it has a non-stick coating, and people would normally understand that to mean a plain stainless steel surface without non-stick coating. Having said that, for many applications ...


25

No, not all stainless steel pans have a nonstick coating. Your average pan with the silvery inside is simply stainless steel, not coated. (Source) Nonstick coatings are usually dark or black and have a specific, non-metallic surface.(Source) So if you go shopping, read the label and look at the product and the question should answer itself.


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Stainless steel pans are not non-stick by default, since they don't have a non-stick surface/coating. You can recognize a non-stick pan by the non-stick coating on the inside of it. (It's usually Teflon (a black coating), but there's also things like ceramic) As far as your pan goes, it looks like a plain stainless steel pan to me, no coating to make it non-...


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Of course you can. I have often baked pies and tarts in metal dishes: one can even buy metal dishes with removable bottoms specifically for baking tarts. In order of heat capacity, stainless steel has the least heat capacity, then cast iron, then ceramic. The metal pans are more conductive (and darker) so you will find your crust cooks slightly more quickly. ...


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Never use steel wool on an aluminum pans or put in the dishwasher. It damages the surface and as others have said, provides fresh O2 to form oxides. Use scrubby sponges or brushes after soaking if necessary and most importantly, use parchment paper all the time. Buy it in 1/2 sheet pan sized sheets that fit ‘cookie sheets’ perfectly or cut to size. ...


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It is oxidised aluminium (Al2O3). This is formed by oxidising with the oxygen in the air to form the aluminium oxide. Al2O3 forms a very thin (4 nm) impermeable layer on your Al, which prevents further oxidation and appears as a dull grey on the surface. Polished Al is shiny and can be highly reflective. Al2O3 appears as a dark grey/black colour when you ...


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