13

Since you ask about other tools, I recommend avoiding the mixer altogether and instead grate frozen butter into the flour. If you have a food processor you can use the coarsest grating blade--chilling the bowl and grater first will help keep the butter cold will help--but it goes quickly by hand with a coarse grater. The key is to get the butter distributed ...


11

I think I finally found a solution, which worked for me: I started with @monte-hill's notes about how the dough is too wet, causing it to stick, and added something I learned elsewhere. My mistake was that I was dumping all the liquids into the mixing bowl right at the start. The best solution I found that works is to GRADUALLY add the liquids. I put a ...


10

I've got one of the professional series Kitchen Aids (and my parents have the traditional version to compare and contrast). If money isn't a huge deal, then getting the professional series comes with a more powerful motor and a heavier base that will stop the mixer from "walking" around the counter if you put dough or something dense in the mixer. One ...


9

The paddle should be used for this. You'll want to do it on a lower speed, probably no higher than 2 or 3. You'll have problems with the flour flying up before you have trouble with the butter melting. It will also help to chop the butter up some before putting it in.


8

If you whisk egg whites to much they will definitely separate. Basically you are over tightening their stretchy proteins which squeeze out all the water. You are left with useless protein fluff floating on water. The flavor and odor will not change, however. That would be a sign off spoiling and unrelated to the whisking.


8

The C, J or spade hook is a dismal excuse, having an older "professional" (as you say, in name only) 5-quart Kitchen-Aid mixer that came with one. Per comment above one evidently cannot just swap to the spiral hook on that era of mixer due to the bearings being different. The C hook works against the sides of the bowl, while the spiral works against the ...


8

While two of the three items you mention are similar (though not identical) - the food processor and blender - the third is completely different - the stand mixer. There's actually a pretty awesome, in-depth guide to these and more kitchen tools on BuzzFeed. I'm going to reference this some and use images from it. Stand Mixers A stand mixer is not a ...


7

The only one that could feasibly handle it would be the grinder. However, in the manual http://www.kitchenaid.com/assets/pdfs/product/ZUSECARE/FGA_Use%20and%20Care_EN.pdf on page 5 it states "Note: Very hard, dense foods such as totally dried homemade bread should not be ground in the Food Grinder. Homemade bread should be ground fresh and then oven or air-...


7

I would recommend against gatting the models below 325 watt. The 325W models is easily strong enough for breads, cakes, and cookies. Although it does sound a bit tortured on heavier dough and doesn't like mixing tough stuff for extended lengths and gets warm. The higher power models tend to have a different release mechanism where the bowl lifts into ...


7

There are two main reasons that this will happen. Not enough dough and not enough water. When making bread dough by hand you want drier dough so that it can be conveniently worked. You also don't want to be elbow deep in dough so it's nicer to make smaller batches. On the other hand, when using a stand mixer the dough needs to be softer and deep enough to ...


7

The idea of creaming is definitely to incorporate some air into the fat-sugar mixture, which should give the final product a lighter texture. So perhaps your cake was a little heavier than it was supposed to be. Good creaming also helps distribute the fat well. But maybe you managed to mix some more air in later in the recipe - certainly I imagine you could ...


7

It won't ruin the bowl, but be careful handling it. Plastic becomes more brittle when cold, and if you drop it, it may shatter or crack.


6

I mix dough in my kitchenAide all the time, and this happens all the time, so through the process I check the consistency and dryness and I've developed a feel for the "just right formula", but being ADHD I don't go in with precise measurements each time, but that would be a good idea once perfection is found. So anywho, I take a strong spatula from time to ...


6

A paddle mixes denser ingredients vs a wisk attachment that will aerate light ingredients. Things mixed with a paddle are always intended to be completely mixed- as opposed to folding or cutting which aren't done with a mixer. This means that you can use whatever you want to thoroughly mix those ingredients (as long as it doesn't melt them): a stand mixer, ...


5

Did you mix using high speed? Using a relative low speed will reduce the likelihood of the dough to wrap around the hook.


5

Often, higher hydration doughs don't need to be mixed in a mixer at all. However, when using a mixer, it is more important to get the hydration correct, than to have all of the dough come away from the side of the bowl. I would say to use a kitchen scale to measure ingredients, and don't worry about whether or not the dough comes away from the side of the ...


4

One factor not on your list is orbital motion. I have a kitchen aid and a bosch. The kitchen aid is orbital and the bosch isn't. The orbital motion makes a huge difference when kneading bread doughs. The size of the bowl matters a great deal. It should be big enough to do what you need it to and not bigger. A big bowl will struggle to beat a single egg ...


4

Instead of a mixer, I use a food processor (Magimix) with a steel knife. It's the fastest way to blend cold butter with flower without heating and melting the butter. Note that a mixer will probably heat the butter because more energy must be applied to squash the butter than to cut it.


4

Dice the butter and use the paddle attachment, as sourd'oh recommended. The paddle will break up the butter some, but more importantly will 'squish' the pieces, making them thinner and flatter. That will layer the butter through your pastry, making it flaky. This is similar to the effect of coarsely grating the butter, but will create a good shape and mix ...


4

This is mentioned in the user manual for your stand mixer (the larger more detailed booklet, not the quick start pamphlet). Those speeds exist on your machine, they just aren't labeled. The odd speeds aren't commonly used, so by design the lever is predisposed to "notch" at the evens, and the lever naturally wants to find a place there. However if you need ...


3

Well, I have to go against what sourd'oh said, I like the whisk attachment for cutting in butter. I have owned two kitchen aid's in the past and they both had nice solid whisks with thick wires that worked great for cutting in the butter. And to go with the heat theory that uval mentioned, a whisk has much smaller surface area hitting the butter and so is ...


3

From the sounds of it, because you were using it for a rather dry dough, it might've had to work more than it usually does, and could have resulted in some grinding of gears. Now, if the mixer completely bogs down, most Kitchenaid models have a sacrifical gear that's made of plastic that will get destroyed close to the motor (ie, up top, not near the ...


3

I agree with rumtscho that your dough is probably way too wet, but I'd like to make a few other points as well: You don't necessarily need to add extra flour just because your dough is sticking to the bottom of your bowl. And definitely don't add any flour until your dough is fairly smooth (unless you already have a feel for the recipe). The flour will ...


3

My dough hook was almost impossible to remove. I tried many things but pouring very hot water over the the spring and shaft worked in a short time. Make sure it is unplugged and water does not get into the motor. It might take several attempts to free it. Clean the shaft and the area of the hook where the shaft inserts. Apply some cooking oil to those ...


3

I've owned three different stand mixers ... well, the first one, I don't know if it really counts --- it was a hand mixer that had a stand so you could use it as a hand or stand mixer. I've had both a KitchenAid 'Ultra Power' (4.5qt, tilt-head) and a 'Pro' (6qt, bowl-lift). If it weren't for the increased capacity, I'd switch back to the Ultra Power (or ...


3

If we assume that each of the mixers is as capable as your existing one, you'd have to consider how much it saves you, and compare that to the cost of the new mixer. New, that model of mixer when new goes for US$10,000 to $15,000. Accessories will increase the cost; the scraper blade you mentioned runs around $500. We have two ways to calculate the value ...


3

Rye and whole wheat flours contain bran and the germ of the wheat, which absorb more water than white flour, so your dough became too dry to stick to the dough hook. I would bet that the bread turned out a bit close textured as well. You need to add more water, how much depends on your flour, it may be up to an extra 30%. The way I'd attack this is to ...


3

No, the power your mixer consumes is rather meaningless, and I would never use it in a buying decision. Maybe it is in principle possible to construct a bad mixer whose main problem is being underpowered, but since mixer wattage has long fallen victim to Goodheart's law, you can safely assume that everything on the market has sufficient wattage, and if a ...


2

Many professional grade stand mixers come with an attachment mount, including Kitchen Aid, Hobart, and others. This mount can fit various tools, including: Slicer (meats, vegetables, etc.) Meat grinder Grater (cheese, etc.) Sausage stuffer Pasta maker I've found these stand mixers much more useful, as the powerful motor serves several purposes. I have a ...


2

had a stuck mixer attachment, 2mins under the hot tap worked, then I added vaseline to the top to make it easier to attach, I believe washing in dishwasher removed all grease from it. thanks


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