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17

There are various bacteria that can make yogurt. They ferment milk at warm temperatures and are called "thermophilic" for that reason. These bacteria were cultivated by millenia ago. I assume by having milk accidentally spoil to something that didn't kill the starving person who ate it. Tasty thermophilic lactobacilli do exist in the wild but so do plenty ...


14

If the starter is "bubbling nicely" then you may be already there. Bread rises because the CO2 produced by the yeast is trapped by the protein in the dough. If you see bubbles then your starter is already producing the necessary CO2. A starter has so much water in it that the protein doesn't trap the gas- thus you see bubbles rise to the surface. If you ...


12

Admittedly I have only stored my starter in a glass jar, but I wouldn't want anything else. You should look for a size that is neither too large, nor too small. It should comfortably hold your sourdough starter when you are simply feeding it - I usually store 200g of starter, at 100% hydration (100g flour, 100g water) or thereabouts. However, when actually ...


10

Sourdough is a combination of yeast (which provide rising power) and bacteria (which make the starter sour and keep other nasty things from growing in it). New starters will usually establish strong bacteria growth long before they get strong yeast growth. The bacteria growth will start within the first couple days, which will make your starter begin to ...


10

It is true that Saco Buttermilk Blend contains no live cultures. If you can have any further questions, please feel free to call our consumer line at 1-800-373-7226. We are happy to answer any questions you may have about our product! Amy Verheyden Director of Consumer Affairs Saco Foods, Inc.


9

Entree in American English means main course, despite the original French meaning. This name is a sort of historical accident. Originally there were far more courses than just starters/appetizers, main course, and dessert. There have been a large variety of traditions, but a reasonably common meal structure was to have small appetizers (hors d'oeuvres), ...


9

At the beginning, you are throwing out a lot because you are just feeding the culture. You're just seeding the growth medium (fresh flour and water) with the young culture, so you want to be sure that the ratio of food to culture is appropriate. Once the culture is established, you don't have to throw out any, but you do have to keep feeding it. This ...


9

Short answer: YES, a sourdough culture can change when moved to a different location. But the amount and types of shifts are unpredictable, and other factors (feeding schedule and regimen, kitchen conditions like temperature, nutrients from flour, etc.) can also cause significant changes. Also, environmental conditions can include not only microorganisms ...


8

Sourdough starters are rarely completely ruined, unless you're growing significant amounts of mold or something. It is possible that your refrigerated "break" early in establishing your starter ended up hurting the yeast population and accidentally selected for something else (perhaps undesirable bacteria) that is now growing and creating odd odors. It's ...


8

Off the top of my head, I don't know of scientific studies that have tested this. But even if there were, I don't think they'd necessarily be meaningful in comparing a particular store-bought culture to a particular "heirloom" culture. The general thing to remember about store-bought cultures is that they are bred for rapid and consistent fermentation (...


8

Starters are typically maintained at 100% hydration. That means equal parts water and flour. So, in your case, mix equal parts water and flour. Measure 1 cup of that, and add it to your mix. Of course, this will mean that all of your starter is gone. Alternately, feed your starter (equal parts water and flour) with more than you need, and let it sit on ...


8

Filtering water may not remove all or even any of the chlorine in your water, it depends upon the filter. Chlorine is the bane of sourdough starter's very existence. In 2017, Nashville tested the free chlorine (the chlorine 'left' in water after it has done its job of killing nasties in the water treatment facilities and the pipes on the way to your home) ...


8

I would discard this batch, carefully clean everything and start over. If you truly mixed well in the beginning, then the fluffy bits are probably mold and the black spots are somewhat fishy as well. After only 24 hours, you won’t have a strong culture going under that top layer and the mold problem will likely continue. Remember that a sourdough means that ...


7

I recommend the Harsch Fermenting Crock. I use the smallest one and it is pretty large, but I have never had a problem with my starter overflowing. The water seal on this crock lets gas out and provides a good seal. I always worry about using glass jars. You can't seal too tight or they might explode. I also don't want bread that tastes like the inside of ...


6

Yes! I'm currently attending Le Cordon Bleu for Baking and Patisserie. I'm in the breads class right now, and my text book has a recipe for a potato sour with raw potato. Here.. 8 oz Bread Flour 6.5 oz Warm Water .16 oz (1 tsp) Salt .16 oz (1 tsp) Sugar 1 Large Potato, peeled Mix together the flour, water, salt, and sugar into a smooth soft dough. Add ...


6

I use a regular wide mouth canning jar with an inverted coffee filter over the top, secured by a canning jar ring. It's worked great for me. if the coffee filter ends up getting stuck, as they eventually will, I just replace it with a new one. The filter breathes and also allows more yeast to get in.


6

It is possible to use pepper stems to create a yogurt like product. They place the stems of hot peppers in prepared milk (heated to >70°C) for 12-24 hours at incubation temperature (40-45°C), after which time it solidifies. The stems are discarded and further batches are created with the product. I myself have tried once with one stem from a sweet red ...


5

My mother-in-law has been baking her own bread for almost 60 years using yeast made from raw potato. She usually takes a medium-sized potato, grates it coarsely and mix it with about 3 desert spoons sugar and 1 desert spoon salt and warm water in a glass jar. This is left in a warm place until the mixtute becomes foamy. A couple of raisins could be added ...


5

Hooch formation is a sign of a starving sourdough starter. I've never actually had hooch forming on a regularly fed sourdough mother. So this is the short answer. I've sometimes spotted something similar to hooch, but it's just a false sign; Twice a day I feed my sourdough starter (it's at room temperature), and I clean my glass jar each feeding. Sometimes ...


5

I have not heard of any machine of that nature, and I try to keep up with an assortment of home beer brewing sources. If anyone would have come up with something, it would probably be brewers, since we tend to use large amounts of live yeast. About the most advanced thing I have heard of is storing wort in Nalgene bottles after boiling and using that for ...


5

In a sourdough starter, the bacteria and wild yeasts feed on starch. This is why bread is usually made from grains, which are very high in starch. Potatoes are one of the very few vegetables which have enough starch to work in a bread. So the idea for a bread from other vegetables won't work. Sweet potatoes could be OK, but definitely not carrots. You could ...


5

The answer is actually both! Yes, the bubbles are caused by the yeast, they are converting sugar to carbon dioxide, among other things. Its also an indicator that the yeast colony is multiplying. So, technically, there is (more) yeast forming.


5

Yes, a well cultured sour dough is actually sour. The bacteria in the culture, lactobacilli, emit lactic acid as a waste product of their metabolism, making the dough acidic and sour.


5

The vibrations will have an effect: On you, because it will be harder to judge the "ripeness" of your refreshed sourdough. You often want to catch the point "just before its starts to go down again" - which will be hard to do when the shaking machine bursts the bubbles all the time. I doubt that the yeasts and bacteria in the starter will mind - they won'...


4

I wouldn't expect much expansion on a newly cultured starter. Given the high water content it will be very 'slack'. Even my many generations old one doesn't rise much unless I leave it at room temp for an afternoon. I would continue with the growth pattern you are following, i.e. cut it in half and feed again a few times. There would be no harm in taking ...


4

as long as it's not airtight, in my experience you can use almost anything: a large jar with a loose lid, a tupperware container that has a small hole in it... that sort of thing.


4

You're right, sourdough starters are different everywhere, based on what yeasts and bacteria are prevalent in that specific location. Certainly climate and altitude affect the living things that float around, so in turn those variables affect starters. I don't know about the poles or the peaks of Denali or Everest, but you can make a perfectly good starter ...


4

A well-developed sourdough should be able to generate a micro climate within his jar that supresses other growth like mold. This holds especially true for "old", well-established strains. We (1) use a sourdough strain that's been cultivated for at least 20 years. (After that, history becomes a bit murky...) Young sourdough is the most susceptible to ...


4

Okay, I usually don't answer my own questions but by the time I got done writing up my question the answer came to me: On day 1 take your one portion of starter and divide it in half. The other half can either be shared with a friend or thrown away. (I promise I won't tell!) On day 5, instead of adding 1 cup of milk/flour/sugar just add 1/2 a cup of each. ...


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