Hot answers tagged

38

Butter is a very bad choice for frying at high heat, as it burns extremely easily. Cast iron is the ideal pan material though, so you are halfway there. Take a flavourless oil like sunflower and brush it directly on the steaks - don't put the oil in the pan. Preheat the pan until it is ridiculously hot. Preheat the oven if that's the method you're going ...


33

You need to realize that oil doesn't splatter, water does. In fact, you could heat oil until it catches fire without any mayor movement. But the moment water reaches the oil, which in a hot pan is way beyond the boiling point for water, it will instantly turn into steam, expand and pull oil drops with it. So apart from lowering the heat - which is not what ...


33

Why would it not be acceptable to cut raw meat? It was already cut from another larger piece of meat that was cut from a whole animal. Nothing terrible will happen. A steak is not a bag of juices, nothing significant will leak off of it. It's indeed better to cut in a smaller piece that fits your pan, the whole steak should touch the bottom of the pan ...


28

Sure it's safe. You are about to char the outside at very high temperatures, nothing's going to survive that, so cleaning it is more about flavor than safety. I wouldn't just wipe it though, clean it with water or you might get a dirtier steak flavor than you'd like.


27

Details on beef color changes can be found here. Briefly: When beef is first cut (or ground or whatever), it has a purplish hue, caused by deoxymyoglobin, a pigment that can only exist in the absence of oxygen. When exposed to oxygen, a chemical reaction occurs, producing oxymyoglobin, which leads to the bright cherry red color most people associate with "...


24

Thin cut meat will curl if there is an outside perimeter of gristle or silverskin (which there usually is). Those things shrink faster than the meat, causing the curling. Take a pair of kitchen shears or a sharp knife and make tiny cuts (it shouldn't take more than 1/4 inch) every inch or so around the perimeter of the steak, just into the meat itself. That ...


23

A good Sirloin (New York Strip steak) has a reasonable marble of fat, so you should not have to worry about edge fat If you like your fat, pull/trim the silverskin and fat off and render the fat in a medium hot pan BEFORE putting the steak in. When enough fat has melted for your taste, cook the steak in the fat at the temperature and time you like Add ...


23

Well, many steak experts have held for years that bone-in steak just tastes better, something about that marrow being good. J. Kenji Lopez-Alt from Serious Eats tested that theory. He found that the steak bones were too impenetrable for the marrow to actually flavor grilling steak, but that the bones provided beneficial insulation: To test this, I ...


22

I'm afraid you have gotten something wrong. Sous-vide and pressure cooking are, as far as food physics is concerned, on the opposite ends of the scale. Pressure cooking allows you to increase the boiling point of water, thus reducing the cooking time. (Bad idea for a tender steak, btw., as soon as you exceed a certain temperature, the proteins in the meat ...


22

There are a few things that you can do: Buy in bulk. There's typically a major discount for buying a 'family pack' (usually 5+ lbs) at once. I like shopping at Wegman's, because they sell steaks that are on sheets where each one's individually wrapped, so I can leave some sealed for later in the week or even freeze them. Shop at more than one store. ...


20

There is no single answer to this question. Instead, a number of factors (not including the weather) affect the perceived tenderness or moistness of a steak or other cut of meat. Overview There are two major factors that effect the perceived moistness of a steak or other cut of meat: The amount of connective tissue. The more connective tissue the meat ...


20

Beef cut does matter. Sirloin tip is a relatively tender cut, cuts that have done more work like shoulder, round, leg cuts have more connective tissue and need a significantly longer cooking time. In a pressure cooker this isn't that long, 1 hour is what I've seen for instant pot recipes using working cuts. Also what matters is fat content. Whatever you ...


19

Grass-fed (and finished) beef fat tastes fishy because it effectively is similar to fish oils. In particular, grass-fed beef fat is dramatically higher in omega-3 fatty acids (alpha-linolenic acids) as opposed to omega-6 (linoleic) fatty acids; this NIH funded study for example found: ... overall average of 1.53 and 7.65 [omega-6 to omega-3 ratio] for ...


18

That "padding" is an absorbent pad made of paper and plastic; the "red substance" inside is the juices (often mistakenly believed to be "blood") that have seeped out of the meat; the purpose of the absorbent pad is to absorb this liquid and keep the interior of the tray dry. Without it, the liquid would pool up and potentially spill out when the tray was ...


18

The method you describe should work, timing wise you have it about right, except it will need longer if you are aiming for well done. Salting and oiling before cooking works well, as does letting the meat come up to room temperature (if you are aiming for rare medium-rare a cold steak isn't a bad thing as it lets you char the outside more while having the ...


16

"3-4 minutes of searing on each side" sounds very high to me, and likely to result in a burned steak, especially if you don't flip it frequently during the process. It's important to realize that there are (at least) two temperatures that matter when cooking meat: the peak surface temperature, which determines how well browned (or blackened) the meat will ...


16

Since you mention Whole Foods, I'm assuming you're in the US. That being the case, you are likely within reasonable driving distance of a Costco or Sam's Club (big warehouse stores that require memberships). At these stores and many other outlets, you can buy what are known as "primal cuts" in choice and even prime grades. Primal cuts are big anatomical ...


15

This depends completely on the context. Are you at a grill in let's say.. Outback Steakhouse? If so, please throw it away. Are you at a social event or home cooking for yourself/others? clean it off with water and you're good, maybe even feed it to someone you don't like afterwards (unless it's the biggest and best steak, then you gotta eat it.)


14

I've usually found Bison Burgers, and other things made from Bison to be "drier" than it's beef cousin. Try, instead, a high-heat quick sear - no more than 30-45 seconds on each side, and then finish in the oven at a lower temperature. Let your pan heat up as hot as it can go before dropping in your steak. Cast iron is best for this since it'll lose less ...


13

The risks of eating undercooked steak vary based on the the region, the risk status of the person involved (are they a child, elderly, or immunocompromised in any way). For normal healthy adults, the risks of eating a single bit of under cooked steak in any of the industrialized nations are fairly small. Nothing might happen You might suffer from food-...


13

In Scandinavia we have this thing: The "lid" is a thin wire mesh that allows steam to escape and keeps most of the oil in. I have no idea what it is called in english :-)


13

It's quite likely that the steaks that ended up darker were dry when you started cooking them. If you don't dry off the surface of your steak, the heat is used to evaporate the moisture on the surface, which ends up steaming the steak rather than developing a good char/crust. The darker colors are the result of a chemical reaction that results in more ...


12

Your best bet for preserving quality (and safety) is to re-seal the bag, then leave them in the fridge for a bit. You want them to thaw a little, so you can pry them apart. Its safe to re-freeze after this (as the meat never entered the danger zone, indeed it probably never got above ~30°F). There will be some quality loss from the partial thaw-freeze cycle. ...


12

130F (approx. 54C) works great. That brings it to the very bottom of the "medium-rare scale", allowing you to sear before presentation without overcooking. Although, I have to tell you, filet mignon is kind of a waste with sous vide. Not that it won't be great, but a much less expensive cut can be cooked at that temperature much longer and give you ...


11

Onions contain proteolytic enzymes, just like honey and certian fruits, which makes them ideal to help tenderize meat. They are a very common type of vegetable that's low in calories, and have a place in nearly every cuisine around the world. One prime example is a dish from Japan known as Chaliapin Steak, which is a dish where you score the meat (make grid ...


11

You could do it, and it would certianly cause the meat to be cooked. However, I suspect it would lead to a less-than-tasty result. There are two potential issues here that I can see: If you're steaming, the temperature maxes out at 100 degrees Centigrade. This leads to longer cooking time, and a "washed" look. Think of how the chicken meat looks in chicken ...


11

Marbling From my experience working in butcher shops, you want to first look for good marbling (unless you are on a low fat diet). To illustrate: I prefer personally anywhere between No. 5 and No. 8. No. 9 and up I find a bit excessive, though some people like it that way. I have had some below No. 5 and they were still good, though. Dry-aging From ...


11

sous vide is an excellent technique to use, for your situation. You can cook any number of foods to your desired doneness while also pasteurizing the product. So, you can have your cake and eat it too, so to speak. With sous vide there is no problem with a rare steak, because you can pasteurize. Remember, pasteurization is not simply a result of ...


10

You should apply as little knife pressure as possible in order to keep the meat from moving as you slice. I can offer a few suggestions towards that end. First you need to take the translucent white stuff off. That silverskin is much tougher than muscle and is probably making you use too much force as you cut through it. You also don't want it on your ...


10

I would actually recommend the opposite of what was said above. Since the meat is so thin you may have much better results pan searing it in an extremely hot pan from slightly frozen. This way the outermost layer will start to undergo the maillard reaction long before the inside of the steak reaches a medium-rare temp and will give you a better chance of ...


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